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Table Of Contents

A twist in the history of patents
From theoretical physicist to advocate for biodiversity
Agriculture and violence
Focus on biotechnology and patenting
The influence of Gandhi
The death of economic democracy
The recovery of economic democracy
The flow of wealth from South to North
From ownership of land to ownership of biodiversity
War is globalization by other means
Introduction
Water lessons
Dams
Industrial agriculture and the World Bank
Women organizers and activists
The market paradigm and the ecological paradigm
Water rights and indigenous communities
Cowboy economics
The Narmada Project / the Baliraja Memorial Dam
Public-private water projects
Corporate states and privatization
Earth democracy
Crop prices fixed by farming communities
The World Summit
State appropriates people’s resources for corporate profits
Suez-Degrémont Water Plant at Sonia Vihar
Who is paying for corporate profits?
Water Requirement and Sources of Water in Delhi
Corruption in Delhi Jal Board's Suez Degrémont Plant
Destruction of Tehri for Water Supply to Delhi
Gangotri glacier recedes fast helping Suez to cash water
Impact of Water Diversion on Agriculture and Food Security
Water Requirements for Different Crops
Upper Ganga Canal: the lifeline of Western U.P
Water Needs for Different Crops in the region
Water Requirement for Rice
What does diverting water to Delhi mean for National Food Security?
Alternatives to privatization of Ganga and meeting Delhi's water needs (1)
The Indian Express
Implications of the WTO for agriculture
Corporate Double Standard
The Union Carbide Bhopal disaster
Cattle feed
The Great Trade Robbery
What happens with these subsidies?
How cows and farmers survive
WTO Negotiations
Privatizing every sphere of activity
The British legacy in India
Divide and rule (the British and the WTO)
The Bengal Famine
Famine amidst food surplus
The Kalahandi Syndrome
Importing Unemployment
Agriculture technology
Micro-credit
Traditional farming practices
SEWA
A real democratic movement
Village republics
“Engineer bureaucrat and contractor friendly”
Leading the world into two clear halves
From staple foods to cash crops
The diversification mantra
He who controls food controls the world
Genetically-modified crops
Control through research
Profit-securing crops
Privatization of research
Value-added exports
Tea from Luxembourg
Part of our culture, part of their business
One man took up the courage …
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Vandana Shiva _ Water Wars _interview's

Vandana Shiva _ Water Wars _interview's

Ratings: (0)|Views: 5,065|Likes:
Published by Slobodan Kovac
There are three negative consequences of public-private water projects. The first is it inevitably leads to the privatization of the state. As is being done here at the World Summit, voluntary agreements are no more part of policy. They are no more debated through transparency of parliamentary debates. Executives, individual bureaucrats in power, usually with a kickback or a bribe, sign off something that does not belong to the state. Water. It is not the property of the state. Water belongs to the people and the earth. It is a community resource, common property. Common property cannot become state property. But private-public partnerships assume water to be a state property, to then be privatized to a private corporation. But the very action privatizes the state and stops it from being a public entity. That to me is the single most crucial damage that it does.
Second, it takes what is a community resource and transfers it into a monopoly right. A distortion. First, a monopoly of the state and then a monopoly of the corporation that takes over.
And the third damage it does, it leaves no accountability system either within a public-oriented state regulation or commons-oriented community regulation to regulate use.
There are three negative consequences of public-private water projects. The first is it inevitably leads to the privatization of the state. As is being done here at the World Summit, voluntary agreements are no more part of policy. They are no more debated through transparency of parliamentary debates. Executives, individual bureaucrats in power, usually with a kickback or a bribe, sign off something that does not belong to the state. Water. It is not the property of the state. Water belongs to the people and the earth. It is a community resource, common property. Common property cannot become state property. But private-public partnerships assume water to be a state property, to then be privatized to a private corporation. But the very action privatizes the state and stops it from being a public entity. That to me is the single most crucial damage that it does.
Second, it takes what is a community resource and transfers it into a monopoly right. A distortion. First, a monopoly of the state and then a monopoly of the corporation that takes over.
And the third damage it does, it leaves no accountability system either within a public-oriented state regulation or commons-oriented community regulation to regulate use.

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Published by: Slobodan Kovac on Oct 31, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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09/09/2012

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