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Antient Beings - Antient Mythology Jacob Bryant Resistance 2010

Antient Beings - Antient Mythology Jacob Bryant Resistance 2010

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Published by Sevan Bomar
From a sentence to a word to a letter to a symbol to a dot to no-thing such is the process of life and language. It will be most interesting to observe how humanity discovers its connection to all everything. I have posted this work because it is an etymology masterpiece and deserves to be highlighted in addition to allowing me to continuously bring you treasures. I'm tireless for you.
http://www.resistance2010.com

My interest is to build bridges to allow consciousness to connect so all the Beings can marvel at what it truly is without fear.
From a sentence to a word to a letter to a symbol to a dot to no-thing such is the process of life and language. It will be most interesting to observe how humanity discovers its connection to all everything. I have posted this work because it is an etymology masterpiece and deserves to be highlighted in addition to allowing me to continuously bring you treasures. I'm tireless for you.
http://www.resistance2010.com

My interest is to build bridges to allow consciousness to connect so all the Beings can marvel at what it truly is without fear.

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: Sevan Bomar on Dec 26, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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Title: A New System; or, an Analysis of Antient Mythology. Volume I. Author: Jacob BryantRelease Date: August 31, 2006 [EBook #19153]Language: EnglishProduced by Dave Maddock, Keith Edkins and the OnlineDistributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.netTranscriber's note: A few typographical errors have been corrected: theyare listed at the end of the text. A NEW SYSTEM;OR, AN ANALYSISOF ANTIENT MYTHOLOGY:WHEREIN AN ATTEMPT IS MADE TO DIVEST TRADITION OF FABLE; AND TO REDUCE THE TRUTH TO ITS ORIGINAL PURITY,BY JACOB BRYANT, ESQ. _THE THIRD EDITION._ IN SIX VOLUMES.WITH A PORTRAIT ANDSOME ACCOUNT OF THE AUTHOR; A VINDICATION OF THE APAMEAN MEDAL;Observations and Inquiries relating to variousParts of Antient History; A COMPLETE INDEX, AND FORTY-ONE PLATES, NEATLY ENGRAVED.VOL. I.LONDON:PRINTED FOR J. WALKER; W.J. AND J. RICHARDSON; R. FAULDER AND SON; R. LEA;J. NUNN; CUTHELL AND MARTIN; H.D. SYMONDS; VERNOR, HOOD, AND SHARPE; E.JEFFERY; LACKINGTON, ALLEN, AND CO.; J. BOOKER; BLACK, PARRY, ANDKINGSBURY; J. ASPERNE; J. MURRAY; AND J. HARRIS.1807.* * * * *SOME ACCOUNTOF THELIFE AND WRITINGSOFJACOB BRYANT, ESQ.* * * * *The earliest authentic account we can obtain of the birth of this learnedand celebrated writer, is from the Register Book of Eton College, in whichhe is entered "of Chatham, in the county of Kent, of the age of twelveyears, in 1730,"--consequently, born in 1718.Whence a difference has arisen between the dates in this entry, and theinscription on his monument, hereafter given, we are unable to explain.The two royal foundations of Eton, and King's College, Cambridge, justlyboast of this great scholar and ornament of his age. He received his firstrudiments at the village of Lullingstone, in Kent; and was admitted uponthe foundation, at Eton College, on the 3d of August, 1730, where he wasthree years captain of the school, previous to his removal to Cambridge. He was elected from Eton to King's College in 1736; took the degree ofBachelor of Arts in 1740; and proceeded Master in 1744.He attended the Duke of Marlborough, and his brother, Lord Charles Spencer,at Eton, as their private tutor, and proved a valuable acquisition to that
 
illustrious house; and, what may be reckoned, at least equally fortunate,his lot fell among those who knew how to appreciate his worth, and wereboth able and willing to reward it. The Duke made him his privatesecretary, in which capacity he accompanied his Grace during his campaignon the continent, where he had the command of the British forces; and, whenhe was made Master-General of the Ordnance, he appointed Mr. Bryant to theoffice of Secretary, then about 1400l. per annum.His general habits, in his latter years, as is commonly the case withsevere students, were sedentary; and, during the last ten years of hislife, he had frequent pains in his chest, occasioned by so muchapplication, and leaning against his table to write; but, in his youngerdays, spent at Eton, he excelled in various athletic exercises; and, by hisskill in swimming, was the happy instrument in saving the life of thevenerable Dr. Barnard, afterwards Provost of Eton College. The doctorgratefully acknowledged this essential service, by embracing the firstopportunity which occurred, to present the nephew of his preserver with theliving of Wootton Courtney, near Minehead, in Somerset; a presentationbelonging to the Provost of Eton, in right of his office.Mr. Bryant was never married. He commonly rose at half past seven, shavedhimself without a glass, was seldom a quarter of an hour in dressing, atnine rung for his breakfast, which was abstemious, and generally visitedhis friends at Eton and Windsor, between breakfast and dinner, which wasformerly at two, but afterwards at four o'clock. He was particularly fondof dogs, and was known to have thirteen spaniels at one time: he once verynarrowly escaped drowning, through his over eagerness in putting them intothe water.Our author must be considered as highly distinguished, beyond the commonlot of mortality, with the temporal blessings of comforts, honour, and longlife. With respect to the first of these, he enjoyed health, peace, andcompetence; for, besides what he derived from his own family, the presentDuke of Marlborough, after his father's death, settled an annuity on Mr.Bryant of 600 l. which he continued to receive from that noble family tillhis death.He was greatly honoured among his numerous, yet chosen friends andacquaintance; and his company courted by all the literary characters in hisneighbourhood. His more particular intimates, in his own district, wereDoctors Barford, Barnard, Glynn, and Heberden. The venerable Sir GeorgeBaker, he either saw or corresponded with every day; likewise with Dr.Hallam, the father of Eton school, who had given up the deanery of Bristol,because he chose to reside at Windsor. When he went into Kent, the friendshe usually visited were the Reverend Archdeacon Law, Mr. Longley, Recorderof Rochester, and Dr. Dampier, afterwards Bishop of that diocese. Besidesthe pecuniary expression of esteem mentioned above, the Duke of Marlboroughhad two rooms kept for him at Blenheim, with his name inscribed over thedoors; and he was the only person who was presented with the keys of thatchoice library. The humble retreat of the venerable sage was frequentlyvisited by his Majesty; and thus he partook in the highest honours recordedof the philosophers and sages of antiquity. Thus loved and honoured, heattained to eighty-nine years of age, and died, at Cypenham, near Windsor,Nov. 13, 1804, of a mortification in his leg, originating in the seeminglyslight circumstance of a rasure against a chair, in the act of reaching abook from a shelf.He had presented many of his most valuable books to the King in hislife-time, and his editions by Caxton to the Marquis of Blandford: theremainder of this choice collection he bequeathed to the library of King'sCollege, Cambridge, where he had received his education.He gave, by will, 2,000 l. to the society for propagating the gospel, and1,000 l. to the superannuated collegers of Eton school, to be disposed ofas the provost and fellows should think fit. Also, 500 l. to the parish ofFarnham Royal. The poor of Cypenham and Chalvey were constant partakers ofhis bounty, which was of so extensive a nature, that he commissioned theneighbouring clergy to look out proper objects for his beneficence.Mr. Bryant's literary attainments were of a nature peculiar to himself;and, in point of classical erudition he was, perhaps, without an equal inthe world. He had the very peculiar felicity of preserving his eminentsuperiority of talents to the end of a very long life; the whole of which was not only devoted to literature, but his studies were uniformly directedto the investigation of truth. The love of truth might, indeed, beconsidered as his grand characteristic, which he steadily pursued; and thisis equally true as to his motive, whether he was found on the wrong orright side of the question. A few minutes before he expired, he declared tohis nephew, and others in the room, that "all he had written was with aview to the promulgation of truth; and, that all he had contended for, hehimself believed." By truth, we are to understand religious truth, his firm persuasion of the truth of Christianity; to the investigation andestablishment of which he devoted his whole life. This was the centralpoint, around which all his labours turned; the ultimate object at whichthey aimed.Such are the particulars we have been able to collect of this profoundscholar and antiquary. But the life of a man of letters appears, and mustbe chiefly sought for in his works, of which we subjoin the followingcatalogue:The first work Mr. Bryant published was in 1767, intituled, "Observationsand Inquiries relating to various Parts of antient History; containingDissertations on the Wind Euroclydon, (see vol. v. p. 325.); and on theIsland Melite, (see vol. v. p. 357.), together with an Account of Egypt inits most early State, (see vol. vi. p. 1.); and of the Shepherd Kings."(See vol. vi. p. 105.) This publication is calculated not only to throwlight on the antient history of the kingdom of Egypt, but on the historyalso of the Chaldeans, Assyrians, Babylonians, Edomites, and other nations.The account of the Shepherd Kings contains a statement of the time of theircoming into Egypt; of the particular province they possessed, and, to whichthe Israelites afterwards succeeded. The treatise on the Euroclydon was

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