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bbjan2001

bbjan2001

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Published by Qissa Khwani
Hasan, Syed. A.D (January 2001) "The security apparatus has run Amok"
Interview with late Pakistan Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto circa 2000 who was assassinated in 2007.
Published by Herald Magazine DAWN group.
Republished not for profit and solely for educational purposes.
Copyright DAWN group.
Hasan, Syed. A.D (January 2001) "The security apparatus has run Amok"
Interview with late Pakistan Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto circa 2000 who was assassinated in 2007.
Published by Herald Magazine DAWN group.
Republished not for profit and solely for educational purposes.
Copyright DAWN group.

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Published by: Qissa Khwani on Dec 26, 2011
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09/19/2014

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44
The Herald Annual, January 2001
2000 Annual
exclusive
The securityapparatus hasrun amok”The securityapparatus hasrun amok”
In her most candid interview since 1988, Benazir Bhutto, twice electedprime minister of Pakistan, reveals the extent to which successive civiliangovernments have been held hostage, and destabilised, by the ‘securityapparatus’ of the military. Bhutto, chairperson of the PPP — the singlelargest political party of the country — explains the helplessness ofcivilian governments in the face of Intelligence-inspired disinformation onthe one hand, and ideologically motivated illegal activities of ‘rogueelements’ of the army on the other. She argues that the securityapparatus of the country is out of control and that no government canhope to function smoothly unless these elements are brought under aformalised command structure that prevents them from taking on the roleof a state within a state. There is much evidence to support Bhutto’sclaims, including that of her adversaries — General Aslam Beg, GeneralHameed Gul and General Asad Durrani — all of whom conspired againstcivilian governments and have repeatedly gone on record to admit asmuch. “Blaming politicians alone for tarnishing democracy is actuallyless than half the story,” argues Bhutto. Here, she explains why.
— Benazir Bhutto
From Syed Ali Dayan Hasan in London
 
Q. What do you think is thebasic problem with civil-militaryrelations?A.
The inability of the military tobow before the people’s will.
Q. Why is that?A.
The military’s view on securityand government is at variance withthe popular will. Pakistan is afederation but the armed forcesdistrust provincial units. They arescared of giving up power.
Q. So, what is the solution tothis impasse in civil-militaryrelations?A.
Either we have democracy ordictatorship. The military seeks adictatorship or a controlleddemocracy to continue with theirsecurity agenda. They need thecentralised state and a diversion ofresources for that security agenda.For the first time, they are realisingthe difficulty of running the ship ofstate. I believe the solution lies indemocracy and devolution. Weshould return to the roots of theQuaid. He founded Pakistan on theprinciples of federalism, autonomyand freedom. If we revert to thisdream, we might devolve morepower but we will be more secure.
Q. How has the army managedto present a discredited image ofpolitical figures, including you?A.
I dispute that they havesucceeded but I agree that theyhave tried. There are two factorsthat explain this. One, politicalinstitutions are weak and have poorfinancial resources andorganisational ability. Also, they areunable to communicate freely withthe masses. This is becausegenuine political forces have beencontinually hunted by theestablishment, and when you areconstantly hunted, you have littletime to organise. Second, becausethe army does give power to somepoliticians, it has divided the civilianpopular base by holding out to thosewho cannot win — the promise ofpower without legitimacy.
Q. You have presided twiceover a controlled democracy.What have you learnt from theexperience?A.
There is a tendency inPakistan, due to military
46
The Herald Annual, January 2001
“How can a political party fight an organised military, severalintelligence outfits, the president and the judiciary? It is veryimportant to create this awareness and for the press to comeon board in exposing these manipulations.”
Fighting against the odds: PPP supporters at a rally

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