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Definite Appraisal ArchkoVolume – Hubert_Luns

Definite Appraisal ArchkoVolume – Hubert_Luns

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Published by Hubert Luns
Here are intriguing revelations about biblical history and the roots of Christianity. Hidden in libraries these precious texts had survived the ravages of time, to speak to us across two millennia of Christian civilisation. Contrary to popular view, these documents make a valuable contribution to the understanding of Holy Script. But instead of provoking fascination by learned scholars, no student of religion has ever undertaken a serious investigation. Science is by nature objective. Scientists are by nature subjective. For a man to be objective requires effort. There can be a great expanse, sometimes, between what is professed and what is done.
Here are intriguing revelations about biblical history and the roots of Christianity. Hidden in libraries these precious texts had survived the ravages of time, to speak to us across two millennia of Christian civilisation. Contrary to popular view, these documents make a valuable contribution to the understanding of Holy Script. But instead of provoking fascination by learned scholars, no student of religion has ever undertaken a serious investigation. Science is by nature objective. Scientists are by nature subjective. For a man to be objective requires effort. There can be a great expanse, sometimes, between what is professed and what is done.

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Categories:Topics, History
Published by: Hubert Luns on Dec 26, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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09/03/2014

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T H E A R C H K O – V O L U M E
A N A P P R A I S A L
I N D E X
01 –
 Introduction
 02 –
 How these works of literature were found
03 –
The verdict was quickly settled 
 04 –
 In a way not easy to imagine…
 
05 –
Truth, given the appearance of falsity
06 –
 A discussion of Gamaliel’s Interview (the Pseudo-Gamaliel)
 
07 –
 None or all
08 –
 A discussion of the Documents
 09 –
The Talmuds
 
10 –
The Book of Jasher, a case in point 
 
Written by Hubert Luns in the year of our Lord 2015, or 2008 AD, considering that our beloved Lord and Saviour was born in 8 BC.
 
 
- 2 -
‘The ArchkoVolume’
1 – Introduction
In the second part of the 19
th
 centurey a certain Reverend Mahan was doing work on the dis-covery of very ancient documents, some of which were said to be held at the senatorial docket in the Vatican libraries and others at the Hagia Sophia library in Instanbul (Constantinople). (1) Claimed to be documents from the days of Christ, they relate to the circumstances of His life and death. They were gathered in the ArchkoVolume, first published in 1887. ‘Archko’ is supposedly derived from Archive-Konstantinople. They offer a riveting look at the people and events surrounding Jesus' life. Included are amongst others the Acta Pilata, which is Pilate’s report to Cæsar, detailing the apprehension, trial and crucifixion of Jesus, as well as an interview with the Virgin Mary and St Joseph, and also a report concerning the Resurrec-tion. (2) For more than 120 years these “finds” were considered a fraud. But I do not agree. I have set myself to the task to convince the reader that they might be genuin.
• The full table of contents of the ArchkoVolume is as follows
 
Chapter 01
: How these records were discovered
(pp. 9-51).
 
Chapter 02
: A short sketch of the Talmuds
(pp. 52-59).
Chapter 03
: Constantine’s letter in regard to having fifty copies of the Scriptures  written and bound
(pp. 60-63).
 
Chapter 04
: Jonathan’s interview with the Bethlehem shepherds, an introduction to the Letter of Melker, Priest of the Synagogue at Bethlehem
(pp. 64-78).
 
Chapter 05
: Gamaliel’s interview with Joseph and Mary and others concerning Jesus
(pp. 79-96).
(Actually it should have been called the Pseudo-Gamaliel.)
Chapter 06
: The Apology of Caiaphas or report of Caiaphas sent to the Sanhedrin concerning the execution of Jesus
(pp. 97-116).
Chapter 07
: The Confession of Caiaphas or report of Caiaphas sent to the Sanhedrin concerning the resurrection of Jesus
(pp. 117-127).
 
Chapter 08
: Valleus’ notes (pp. 128-129) – a short mention, which is unrelated to the  Acta Pilati; next comes the Acta Pilati, or Pilate’s Report to Cæsar of the arrest, trial, and crucifixion of Jesus
(pp. 129-147).
 
Chapter 09
: Herod Antipater’s defence before the Roman Senate in regard to his conduct at Bethlehem
(pp. 148-154).
 
Chapter 10
: Herod Antipater’s defence before the Roman Senate in regard to the execution of John the Baptist
(pp. 155-160).
 
Chapter 11
:
 The School of Hillel letters regarding God’s providence to the Jews
(pp. 161-248, which is almost half of the total volume of documents).
 
 
- 3 -
The American clergyman William Dennes Mahan (1824-1906) edited the ArchoVolume and appraised the manuscripts contained therein. He also wrote “Caesar’s Court” and “Hebrew History of Baptism”, which are now difficult to obtain. The ArchkoVolume, on the other hand, has never remained out of print for long. Reputed scholar M. R. James called it
“a ridiculous and disgusting American book”.
 (3) Dr. Goodspeed asserted that Mahan’s
“unre- fined fancy sometimes descends to the vulgar and the indecent”.
 He reiterated that indeed it is a
“ridiculous and disgusting volume”
. The general public evidently does not agree. Otherwise they would not have continued to read it. Although the views expressed by James and Goodspeed give rise to doubts, I have to admit that certain parts intrigued me even before I had submitted them to critical analysis. They have an irresistable attractiveness which is dificult to describe. In the course of 125 years the ArchkoVolume has made its own place in the apocryphal literature, in which – it must be said  – there is great deal of material worth less than the ink it is written in. Much of it, after an initially enthusiastic reception, has long disappeared from the shelves. But such does not appear to have been the case with this work of literature. It has the delicate patina of antiquity and genuineness. Let us now consider the question of provenance.
2 – How these works of literature were found 
 
Rev. Mahan introduces the subject as follows:
 
«« Some time in the year 1856, while living in De Witt, Missouri, a gentleman by the name of H. C. Whydaman became snow-bound and stopped at my house several days. He was a native of Germany, and one of the most learned men I had ever met. I found him to be freely communicative. During his stay, he told me that he had spent five years in the city of Rome, and most of the time in the Vatican, where he saw a library containing 560,000 volumes. He told me that he had seen and read the records of Tiberius Cæsar, and in what was called the Acta Pilati – that is, the acts of Pilate – he had seen an account of the apprehension, trial, and crucifixion of Jesus of Nazareth; but said it did not add much to the commonly accepted teachings of Christianity. He told me, he thought a transcript could be secured. After Mr. Whydaman’s departure, I meditated upon what he had told me of those records, and thought that if a transcript could be obtained it would be very interesting, even if it did not add much to the present teachings of Christianity. »» A few months later, Mahan received a letter from Whydaman: «« It is with the kindest regards I remembered your hospitality while with you in America. Be assured, anything I can do for you will afford me great pleasure. I have written to Father Freelinhusen, a monk of great learning, at Rome, who is the chief guardian of the Vatican. I have made the request in my own name, as I do not think they would be willing for such a document to go into the hands of the public. »» At the end of 1857, Mahan got a second letter from him: «« Father Freelinhusen has answered my letter in regard to the transcript you want. He informs me that the writing is so fine, and being in the Latin language, as I told you, and the parchments so old and dirty, he will be obliged to use a glass to the most of it. He can only give it in the Latin, as he does not understand the English (to translate it into). He says he will do it for thirty-five darics (4), which will be in American coin sixty-two dollars and forty-four cents. If you will forward the amount, I will have the document forwarded to my brother-in-law, C. C. Vantberger. He will translate it for a trifle. »» After having paid Whydaman, Rev. Mahan tells that Whydaman sent a transcript of the Latin directly to Vantberger, who afterwards sent his translation to Rev. Mahan. No mention is made that he also received the Latin transcript or that he ordered a thorough investigation by a

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