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Albert Gallatin Mackey - The History of Freemasonry - Volume II

Albert Gallatin Mackey - The History of Freemasonry - Volume II

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Published by: Big Vee on Dec 29, 2011
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06/16/2013

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THE
HISTORY
OF
FREEMASONRY
ITS LEGENDS AND TRADITIONSITS CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY
B
Y
ALBERT GALLATIN MACKEY, M.D.,
 33
THE HISTORY OF THE
SYMBOLISM OF FREEMASONRY
THE
ANCIENT AND ACCEPTED SCOTTISH RITE
AND THE
ROYAL ORDER OF SCOTLAND
BY WILLIAM R. SINGLETON,
 33
WITH AN
ADDENDA
BY WILLIAM JAMES HUGHAN
P
.·.
S
.·.
G
.·.
D
.·.
OF
G
.·.
L
.·.
OF
E
NGLAND
—P
.·.
S
.·.
G
.·.
W
.·.
OF
E
GYPT
,
ETC
V
OLUME
T
WO
PUBLISHED BY
THE MASONIC HISTORY COMPANYN
EW
Y
ORK AND
L
ONDON
 
CHAPTER XXX
FREEMASONRY AND THE HOUSE OF STUART
HE theory that connects the royal house of theStuarts with Freemasonry, as an Institution to becultivated, not on account of its own intrinsicmerit, but that it might serve as a political engineto be wielded for the restoration of an exiledfamily to a throne which the follies and even thecrimes of its members had forfeited, is so repug-nant to all that has been supposed to be congruous with the truespirit and character of Freemasonry, that one would hardly believethat such a theory was ever seriously entertained, were it not formany too conclusive proofs of the fact.The history of the family of Stuart, from the accession of James I. to the throne of England to the death of the last of hisdescendants, the young Pretender, is a narrative of follies and some-times of crimes. The reign of James was distinguished only byarts which could gain for him no higher title with posterity thanthat of a royal pedant. His son and successor Charles I. wasbeheaded by an indignant people whose constitutional rights andliberties he had sought to betray. His son Charles II., after a longexile was finally restored to the throne, only to pass a life of indo-lence and licentiousness. On his death he was succeeded by hisbrother James II., a prince distinguished only for his bigotry. Zeal-ously attached to the Roman Catholic religion, he sought to re-store its power and influence among his subjects, who were for themost part Protestants. To save the Established Church and the re-ligion of the nation, his estranged subjects called to the throne theProtestant Prince of Orange, and James, abdicating the crown, fledto France, where he was hospitably received with his followers byLouis XIV., who could, however, say nothing better of him thanthat he had given three crowns for a mass. From 1688, the dateof his abdication and flight, until the year 1745 the exiled family
267

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