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DH-0107

DH-0107

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Published by The Delphos Herald

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Published by: The Delphos Herald on Jan 07, 2012
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By JUAN CARLOS LLORCAand LINDASTEWART BALLThe Associated Press
DALLAS — A Texasteenager who was deportedto Colombia after claiming tobe an illegal immigrant wasback in the United States onFriday and at the center of an international mystery overhow a minor could be sent toa country where she is not acitizen.Her family has questionedwhy U.S. officials didn’t domore to verify her identity andsay she is not fluent in Spanishand had no ties to Colombia.While many facts of the caseinvolving Jakadrien LoreceTurner remain unclear, U.S.and Colombian officials havepointed fingers over who isresponsible.Jakadrien arrived inDallas on Friday eveningand was reunited with herfamily. She was flanked byher mother, grandmother andlaw enforcement when sheemerged from the internation-al gate at Dallas-Fort WorthInternational Airport shortlybefore 10 p.m.“She’s happy to be home,”the family’s attorney, RayJackson, said, adding that thefamily would not be issuingany statements Friday night.He said the family was“ecstatic” to have Jakadrienback in Texas and they planto “do what we can to makesure she gets back to a normallife.”Immigration experts saythat while cases of mistak-en identity are rare, peoplecan slip through the cracks,especially if they don’t havelegal help or family membersworking on their behalf. Butthey say U.S. immigrationauthorities had the responsi-bility to determine if a personis a citizen.“Often in these situationsthey have these group hear-ings where they tell everybodyyou’re going to be deported,”said Jacqueline Stevens, apolitical science professorat Northwestern University,who is an expert on immi-gration issues. “Everythingis really quick, even if youunderstand English youwouldn’t understand what isgoing on. If she were in thatsituation as a 14-year-old shewould be herded through likecattle and not have a chanceto talk to the judge about hersituation.”Jakadrien’s saga beganwhen the teen ran away morethan a year ago. Jakadrien’sfamily said she left home inNovember 2010. Houstonpolice said the girl was arrest-ed on April 2, 2011, for mis-demeanor theft in that cityand claimed to be Tika LanayCortez, a Colombian womanborn in 1990. It was unclearif she has been living underthat name.Houston police said in astatement that her name wasrun through a database todetermine if she was wanted
BY STACY TAFFstaff@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Delphosnative Kim Jettinghoff grewup in a family that washappy to get involved in theschool system. As an adultand mother, she considersherself fortunate to be giventhe chance to stay involvedwith her alma mater asthe Delphos City Schoolsadministrative secretary.“School has always beenin my background. My dadwas always a big one to sup-port the schools,” she said.“After I got my degree inapplied business from LimaTechnical College, I wassecretary out at JeffersonHigh School for three years.Then I came to the adminis-trative office. My first yearhere was the 1989-90 schoolyear.”Jettinghoff does all of the normal everyday tasksyou’d expect, along withseveral extra duties thathave fallen in her lap overthe years.“I have to answer phones,notify the office personnelof messages and facilitatethe superintendent in what-ever way is needed, such asfiling, copying, typing, dis-tributing letters and reports,”she said Thursday. “Thoseare the everyday things andthen there are a lot of otherthings I do throughout theyear. They’re having me dopart of the accounts payablenow, not all of it but some.“In the spring, I gath-er up all of the activities,events and things for allof the groups and type upthe activity calendar for theupcoming year to be givenout at registration. In thesummer, I start selling thetickets and season passes forathletics. All of the selling isdone out of this office now.In fact, Mr. Edinger was justhere this morning to pick upsome tickets for students forthis weekend. In January Istart contacting all of ouropen enrollment students tosee if they’ll be coming backnext year. I have Medi-Labcome in for the bus driv-ers; that happens about fourtimes a year.”Jettinghoff also spendstime helping others get a legup — professionally or ineducation.“If there are openings,I do the job postings forcertified, non-certified andsupplemental positions,”she said. “This year I alsostarted lining up substituteteachers, which is a biggertask than you’d think. Wehave quite a large staff andit seems like a lot of peopletake off for surgeries andthings throughout the year.Another thing I do is sendout transcripts to collegesand employers. I also helpwith work permits for stu-dents, things like that.”Even though there aresome occasional issues,Jettinghoff says she can’tthink of anything she doesn’tlike about her job.“I can’t think of anythingnegative to say about it. It’snot like nothing ever goeswrong but it’s just yournormal complications,” shesaid. “I really like the peopleI work with. It’s a smalloffice but busy. We all try tohelp each other out.“When I was at the highschool, I loved getting tobe involved with the stu-dents but here I love thatsomething new is alwaysgoing on and how every-thing changes from seasonto season. I love watchingand following sports. I’mglad I’ve gotten to work inthe school district that bothI and my husband Markattended, as well as our kids.It’s great being done everyday at 3:45 p.m. becauseI’ve gotten to be there forall of their games and eventsthrough the years.”Jettinghoff and her hus-band live in Delphos andare the parents of Courtney(Colin) Spieles; Jordan, cur-rently a sophomore at TheOhio State University; andAustin, a sophomore atJefferson High School.
S
aturday
, J
anuary
7, 2012
D
ELPHOS
H
ERALD
T
he
50¢ dailyDelphos, Ohio
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www.delphosherald.com
Clark Optimist ‘Law Enforcement Officer of the Year’
BY NANCY SPENCERnspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — To thegeneral public, he’s an easy-going guy with a quick smileand quicker wit. He’s knownto have a joke for every occa-sion.To Delphos Police Chief Kyle Fittro, he’s a commit-ted, seasoned cop who stilltackles his job with the enthu-siasm of a rookie.When he attended theDelphos Optimist Clubmeeting on Friday, DelphosAssistant Police Chief andLead Detective Dave Clarkwas expecting to give a pre-sentation on business safety.As he does with any task,he prepared, wrote notes andwas ready to share his knowl-edge and expertise with thegroup.To the club, he’s the 2012“Law Enforcement Officerof the Year” and the ruse of speaking was a way to gethim to the meeting to honorhim as such.As the Optimist “Respectfor the Law” program gotunderway, Clark began torealize perhaps he wasn’tgoing to give the speech hehad ready. As the two runners-up for the “Law EnforcementOfficer of the Year” werehonored: second runner-upPutnam County Sheriff’sDeputy Kevin Siefker andfirst runner-up Van WertPost, Highway Patrol TrooperShawn Cook, Clark’s sharpdetective skills clued him inon where the program wasgoing. As he stood at thepodium and received the “topcop” award from Optimist“Respect for the Law” ChairMichael Friedrich, he quiet-ly, tongue in cheek, informedFittro that lying to a policeofficer is against the law.Clark was nominated byFittro for his overall dedica-tion to his job and goingabove and beyond the callof duty on a regular basis. Inhis nomination letter, Fittrodescribed Clark as “the per-fect blend of rookie drivemixed with veteran wisdomand experience.”Clark began as a patrol-man with the Delphos PoliceDepartment on Nov. 30, 1980,was promoted to sergeant onJan. 29, 1999, and was pro-moted to assistant chief onNov. 11, 2006. As a salariedemployee, he is paid for 40hours, a number Fittro says issurpassed on a regular basis.“Dave averages 60-70hours a week. He does thisto ensure all the criminalinvestigations are being con-ducted properly and to assistour uniformed officers withtheir day-to-day questions,issues and lower-level inves-tigations,” Fittro explained.“It’s not uncommon for Daveto work 30-plus hours in arow on a high-profile casein an attempt to get it solvedquickly.”This was the case whena 25-year-old Andy Lucasinvaded the home of an elder-ly Delphos woman in Julyand severely beat her beforestealing multiple items fromher home and fleeing thescene. After the initial callwent out, Clark worked 33hours in a row to successful-ly identify and arrest Lucas,who was sentenced to 17years in prison in Novemberfor the crime.According to Fittro, thiswas just one of 40 complex,high-profile cases Clark wasinvolved in over the courseof the past year. Those inves-tigations led to the incarcera-tion of 38 people on a total of 67 different charges, nearlyall felony-level.“You have to understand,the impact this has on acommunity is phenomenal,”Fittro said. “Those 38 peoplewere nearly all ‘career’ crimi-nals with lengthy records; thetype of people who repeat-edly prey on the communityand place all of our personalsafety and possessions atrisk. Taking these people outof the picture is why you canfeel safe and secure walkingthe streets of Delphos.”Fittro added that Clark alsodoes a lot of work behind thescenes that is vital to the safe-ty and security of Delphos.“A common example isthat Dave keeps track of criminals. He pays attentionto the guy who is arrestedcounties away but is on pro-bation locally,” he explained.“It’s quite possible that crim-inal might slip through thecracks but Dave works hardto ensure this doesn’t happen.When he learns of an arrest,he contacts the local proba-tion or parole officer with theinformation. Sometimes thisleads to the criminal being jailed for probation or paroleviolation and being taken off the streets for a longer periodof time.”Clark was unusual-ly reserved as he took hisaward.“I’m gracious and hum-bled by this award. I couldn’tbe more honored than to servethe citizens of Delphos,” hesaid. “I don’t want bad thingsto happen to good people.There are a lot of good peo-ple here.”Putnam County Sheriff James Beutler nominat-ed Deputy Siefker for hisactions on the night of June23, 2011.
Nancy Spencer photos
Delphos Assistant Police Chief and Lead Detective Dave Clark accepts the OptimistClub “Law Enforcement Of the Year” award from Respect of the Law Chair MichaelFriedrich Friday. Clark was nominated by Chief Kyle Fittro and is the second officer fromDelphos to win the award.See LAW, page 3See TEEN, page 2
It’s My Job
Jettinghoff 
Jettinghoff enjoys supporting schools
Deported Texas teenreunites with mom
“Often in thesesituations theyhave these grouphearings wherethey tell every-body you’re goingto be deported.Everything isreally quick, evenif you under-stand Englishyou wouldn’tunderstand whatis going on. If she were in thatsituation as a14-year-old shewould be herdedthrough like cattleand not have achance to talk tothe judge abouther situation.”
Jacqueline Stevenspolitical science professor,Northwestern University
Friday’s scoresMAC
Marion Local 44St. Henry 42St. John’s 50New Knoxville 42Fort Recovery 64Versailles 56Coldwater 65Parkway 31Minster 46New Bremen 43
NWC
Ada 50Jefferson 28Allen East 73Spencerville 52Col. Grove 63Lincolnview 44Bluffton 43Paulding 42
WBL
Elida 69St. Marys 39Ott.-Glandorf 67Shawnee 37Bath 61Wapak 47Van Wert 65Kenton 59Defiance 84Celina 48
 
2 The Herald Saturday, January 7, 2012
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
O
BITUARY
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UNERAL
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OTTERY
The Delphos Herald wantsto correct published errors inits news, sports and featurearticles. To inform the news-room of a mistake in publishedinformation, call the editorialdepartment at 419-695-0015.Corrections will be publishedon this page.
C
orreCtions
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l l l l. l l. l. l . l . l,.
 
 
ValidonlyatcertifiedCurvesCompletelocations.Seeclubfordetails.Somerestrictionsapply.Freetrialofferisgoodforoneweek.Notredeemableforcash.©2012CurvesInternational,Inc.
 
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The DelphosHerald
Vol. 142 No. 159
Nancy Spencer, editorRay Geary, general managerDelphos Herald, Inc.Don Hemple, advertisingmanagerTiffany Brantley,
circulation managerThe Daily Herald(USPS 1525 8000) is publisheddaily except Sundays, Tuesdaysand Holidays.By carrier in Delphos andarea towns, or by rural motorroute where available $1.48 perweek. By mail in Allen, VanWert, or Putnam County, $97per year. Outside these counties$110 per year.Entered in the post officein Delphos, Ohio 45833 asPeriodicals, postage paid atDelphos, Ohio.No mail subscriptions will beaccepted in towns or villageswhere The Daily Herald papercarriers or motor routes providedaily home delivery for $1.48per week.405 North Main St.TELEPHONE 695-0015Office Hours8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.POSTMASTER:Send address changesto THE DAILY HERALD,405 N. Main St.Delphos, Ohio 45833
It’s 12:15 a.m. Friday and I’m just gettingaround to my column. Not the best scenariobut it happens.Being a journalist/editor encompasses a lotof territory and many decisions are made asphones are ringing, people are asking ques-tions and others are waiting for articles toplace on pages — deadlines, deadlines, dead-lines. Some turn out good, some OK and someare regretted. None are made maliciously orwith the intent to harm.We also follow the AP Stylebook whenwriting articles. It is the “how-to” guide formost journalists.One thing that has come to my attention:the average person doesn’t know nor probablycares about journalistic etiquette. Rules thatseem simple and make perfect sense to us andare followed because they are rules may notseem correct or logical to others. Trust me,there are even some that don’t make sense tous, either.For instance, when a dateline — the firstthing you read in a story and tells you wherethe event happened — is in Ohio, the state isremoved. It is “supposed” to be understoodthe event happened in the state of the personreading the story; therefore, you don’t need totell them where they are. They are supposedto know.When relating places of interest outside thestate, the state is included in the first referenceand dropped in subsequent mentions. Forexample: “John Doe was raised in Greenville,N.M.” The following references to his home-town are just Greenville, even though there isa Greenville in nearly every state. Some wouldsay mentioning the state again wouldn’t hurt.True. But it takes up space and space is pre-cious in a newspaper. The more space yousave, the more room you have for more news.That’s what it’s all about.Another rule is: time, date, place: “TheKiwanis will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday at theEagles Lodge.” Forever and ever, amen.There are rules for just about everything.The months of March, April, May, June andJuly are never abbreviated. Numbers onethrough nine are spelled out and 10-infinityare actual numbers. The first reference to anordained minister is “the Rev. So and So”and subsequent references are just “Rev. Soand So.”I won’t bore you with any more APStylebook rules and the like. Heck, I don’teven want to talk about them. When I havea question, I pull it out and check myself.There’s one on every desk in the newsroom.We also have the luxury of making someof our own policies, standards and practices.They just need to be consistent so we can tellpeople “this is the way we do it” and it’s thatway every time.What I guess I want you to know is there isa method to our madness. Even though some-times it is madness.Editor’s note:
 It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World 
is a 1963 American comedy film pro-duced and directed by Stanley Kramer aboutthe madcap pursuit of $350,000 in stolen cashby a diverse and colorful group of strang-ers. The ensemble comedy premiered onNov. 7, 1963. The star-studded cast included:Spencer Tracy, Sid Caesar, Milton Berle,Ethel Merman, Mickey Rooney, Jimi Backus,Jimmy Durante, Peter Falk, Jerry Lewis, DonKnotts too many more to mention. It was rightup my dad’s alley with car chases and crashes— his favorite.
On theOther Hand
Dlph Cy schlWk f Ja. 9-13
Monday: Chicken pattysandwich, broccoli with cheese,pears, lowfat milk.Tuesday: Spaghetti with meatsauce, garlic bread, carrot stix,pineapple tidbits, lowfat milk.Wednesday: Franklin:Cheese pizza; Middle andSenior: Cheese quesadilla, salsaand sour cream, garden salad,fruit, lowfat milk.Thursday : Salisbury steak,dinner roll, mashed potatoeswith gravy, fruit, lowfat milk.Friday: Hamburger sandwich,cheese slice, oven potatoes, juicebar, lowfat milk.
s. Jh’Wk f Ja. 9-13
Monday: Beef stew/roll ormini corn dogs, peas, salad, fruitbar, milk.Tuesday: Hamburger sand-wich/ pickle and onion or coldmeat sandwich, assorted fries,salad, mixed fruit, milk.Wednesday: Sub sandwich/lettuce/ tomato/ pickle or BBQpork sandwich, potato chips,salad, pears, milk.Thursday: Popcorn chicken/roll or cold meat sandwich, corn,salad, apple crisp, milk.Friday: Tacos/ soft/ hard/lettuce/ tomato/ cheese/ onionor shredded chicken sandwich,Goldfish crackers, salad, peach-es, milk.
LadckWk f Ja. 9-13
Monday: Breaded chickenstrips, butter/peanut butter bread,potato rounds, fruit, milk.Tuesday: Hamburger andmacaroni, breadstick, lettucesalad, fruit, milk.Wednesday: Meatballs, din-ner roll, corn, fruit, milk.Thursday: Chili soup, crack-ers, butter/peanut butter bread,carrot sticks, fruit, milk.Friday: Macaroni and cheese,butter/peanut butter bread, greenbeans, fruit, milk.
F JgWk f Ja. 9-13
Chocolate, white or strawber-ry milk served with all meals.H.S. - Ala Carte - Pretzeland cheese available everyFriday; Salad bar with fruit andmilk for $2.00 available everyWednesday.Monday: Spaghetti andmeatsauce, breadstick, greenbeans, fruit.Tuesday: Salisbury steak,mashed potatoes and gravy, din-ner roll, peas, fruit.Wednesday: Spicy chickensandwich, mixed vegetables,cheese slice, shape up, fruit.Thursday: Taco, refriedbeans, corn, fruit.Friday: BBQ pork sandwich,baked beans, cookie, fruit.
ovllWk f Ja. 9-13
Monday: Chicken patty, rice,green beans, pineapple, milk. .Tuesday: Sausage patties,tri tator, French toast stix withsyrup, omelet, orange juice,milk.Wednesday: Chicken strips,baked potato, butter bread,peaches, milk.Thursday: Spaghetti, bread-stix, green beans, hot apples,milk. .Friday: Hamburger, frenchfries, peas, pudding, milk.
LclvwWk f Ja. 9-13
Monday: Peppperoni pizza,glazed carrots, apple slice, milk.B. Cheeseburger, nachosTuesday: Chicken patty/bun,peas, fudge, peaches, milk. B.Bacon burger.Wednesday: Macaroni andcheese, chicken legs, broccoli,grapes, milk. B. Loaded potatostrips.Thursday : Hamburger/bun,fries, banana, milk. B. Footlongconey dogFriday: Nachos/meat/cheese,corn, fruit turnovers, pears, milk.B. Grilled chicken breast sand-wich.
GmWk f Ja. 9-13
Monday: Cheeseburger,California blend veggie, apple-sauce, milk.Tuesday: Chicken tenders,carrot sticks with dip, dicedpeaches, soft pretzel, milk.Wednesday: Walking tacowith toppings, refried beans,diced pear, breadstick, milk.Thursday: Real slice cheesepizza, broccoli, mandarin orang-es, milk.Friday: Ravioli with cheesecup, green beans, applesaucecup, Bosco cheese stick, milk.
spcvllWk f Ja. 9-13
Choice of daily salad or sand-wich/wrap with fruit and milk asanother meal option.Monday: Macaroni andcheese, green beans, soft pretzelrod, grape sherbet, milk.Tuesday: Hamburger sand-wich, au gratin potatoes, applecrumble, milk.Wednesday: Grades K-4:Popcorn chicken, diced carrots,fortune cookie, mandarin orang-es, milk. Grades 5-12: Sweet andsour chicken bowl, stir fry veg-gies, fortune cookie, mandarinoranges, milk.Thursday: Walking tacowith toppings, corn, applesauce,milk.Friday: Wedge slice cheesepizza, green beans, peaches,milk.
elda Mddl/ elmayWk f Ja. 9-13
Choice of daily salad or sand-wich/wrap with fruit and milk asanother meal option.Monday: Cheeseburger,California blend veggies, apple-sauce, milk.Tuesday: Chicken tenders,carrot sticks with dip, dicedpeaches, soft pretzel, milk.Wednesday: Walking tacowith toppings, refried beans,diced pears, breadstick, milk.Thursday: Real slice cheesepizza, broccoli, mandarin orang-es, milk.Friday: Ravioli with cheesecup, green beans, applesaucecup, Bosco cheese stick, andmilk.
BAUMGArtner, 
 Homer L., 98, of Delphos,funeral services will begin at2:30 p.m. Sunday at TrinityUnited Methodist Church, theRevs. John Medaugh and DaveHowell officiating. Burial willbe in Walnut Grove Cemetery.Friends may call from 2-4 p.m.and 6-8 p.m. today at Harterand Schier Funeral Home, andalso one hour prior to theservice Sunday at the church.Preferred memorials are tothe Trinity United MethodistChurch Eternal Flower Fund,Cystic Fibrosis Foundation orthe American Cancer Society.
Mach 6, 1925-Ja. 5, 2021
Norma L. (Fronk) Miller,86, of Spencerville, died at7:05 p.m. Thursday at St. Rita’sMedical Center.She was born March 6, 1925,to Frank and Minnie (Stirn)Fronk. They preceded her indeath.Funeral services will beginat 1 p.m. Tuesday at ThomasE. Bayliff Funeral Home,Spencerville, Pastor Tom Shobeofficiating. Burial will follow inSpencerville Cemetery.Friends may call from 4-8p.m. Monday at the funeralhome.Preferred memorials are tothe family.
nma L. FkMll
CLEVELAND (AP) —These Ohio lotteries were drawnFriday:
Mga Mll
09-17-28-34-48, Mega Ball: 46
Mgapl
2
Pck 3 evg
0-1-3
Pck 3 Mdday
3-4-5
Pck 4 evg
7-6-2-2
Pck 4 Mdday
4-6-5-4
Pwball
Estimated jackpot: $44 million
rllg Cah 5
10-19-32-37-39Estimated jackpot: $310,000
t oH evg
01-06-08-10-13-14-19-25-27-32-34-37-42-44-50-51-52-53-56-74
t oH Mdday
03-06-17-29-34-37-39-42-43-44-45-46-49-61-64-68-71-76-77-79During the course of October 2011 the stateLegislature banned all bathsalts and synthetic marijuana.Shortly after the law tookeffect, members of the WestCentral Ohio Crime TaskForce personally went tomultiple locations that his-torically had been sellingthese types of substances.Task force members advisedthe owners and employees atthese locations of the recentban. They explained to themthat they could no longer sellthese types of substances.A short time later, taskforce officers began receivingcomplaints that multiple loca-tions had continued sellingthese now illegal substances,even though they had beenadvised they could no lon-ger do this. After receivingthese complaints, task forcemembers decided to initiatean undercover operation todetermine if the citizen com-plaints were valid.By utilizing undercoverofficers and confidentialinformants, task force mem-bers went to multiple loca-tions and purchased substanc-es that appeared to be the nowillegal bath salts and syntheticmarijuana. The task force sentthe substances to the statecrime lab for thorough analy-sis and the results came backthe substances were in factthe same ones that had beenoutlawed.After learning this infor-mation, task force officerscoordinated another round of undercover buys into thesesame locations. They pur-chased additional amounts of these substances.On Friday, task force offi-cers secured and served searchwarrants against three loca-tions within Allen County.They are as follows:1. Brothers House of Glasslocated at 1273 N. Cole St.in Lima2. The 420 Clinic locatedat 1000 N. Cole St. in Lima3. R Smokes located at241 Elida Road in DelphosThe following items wereseized from the followinglocations;
Bh Hu f Gla
— Multiple firearms;— An undisclosed amountof cash; and— A large amount sus-pected bath salts and syn-thetic marijuana.One male was arrestedfrom this location; however,his identity is being withheldpending the filing of formalcharges.
th 420 Clc
—An undisclosed amountof cash;— A video surveillancesystem; and— A large amount of unknown substances that willbe sent in for testing.
r smk
— An undisclosed amountof cash;— A video surveillancesystem; and— A large amount of unknown substances that willbe sent in for testing.Task force members indi-cate that they will continueto monitor these locationsto ensure they are compliantwith Ohio’s new ban of bathsalts and synthetic marijuana.
(Cud fm pag 1)
by Immigration and CustomsEnforcement but the resultswere negative. She was thenturned over to the HarrisCounty jail and booked onthe theft charge.The county sheriff’soffice said it ran her throughthe available databases anddid the interviews neces-sary to establish her iden-tity and immigration statusin the country, with nega-tive results. A sheriff’s officeemployee recommended thatan immigration detainer beput on her, and upon herrelease from jail she wasturned over to ICE.U.S. immigration officialsinsist they followed proce-dure and found nothing toindicate that the girl wasn’ta Colombian woman livingillegally in the country.An ICE official said theteen claimed to be Cortezthroughout the criminal pro-ceedings in Houston and theensuing deportation process,in which an immigration judge ultimately ordered herback to Colombia.Standard procedure beforeany deportation is to coordi-nate with the other country inorder to establish that personis from there, the ICE officialsaid.The ICE official, speakingon condition of anonymitydue to not being authorizedto discuss additional detailsof the case, said the teenagerwas interviewed by a repre-sentative from the Colombianconsulate and that coun-try’s government issued hera travel document to enterColombia.Jakadrien was issuedtravel documents at therequest of U.S. officialsusing information theyprovided, the ColombianMinistry of Foreign Affairssaid. Colombian officials areinvestigating what kind of verification was conducted byits Houston consulate to issuethe temporary passport.The girl was givenColombian citizenship uponarriving in that country, theICE official said.According to theColombian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the girl wasenrolled in the country’s“Welcome Home” programafter she arrived there. Shewas given shelter, psycho-logical assistance and a job ata call center, a statement fromthe agency said.“If she looked like anadult, and she told them shewas a 21-year-old Colombiancitizen, and she didn’t showup in their databases, thiswas inevitable,” said AlbertArmendariz, an immigrationattorney from El Paso.Jakadrien’s family saysthey have no idea why sheended up in Colombia.Johnisa Turner said the girl isa U.S. citizen who was bornin Dallas and was not fluentin Spanish. She said neithershe nor the teen’s father hadties to Colombia. Jakadrien’sgrandmother, Lorene Turner,called the deportation a “bigmistake somebody made.”“She looks like a kid, sheacts like a kid. How couldthey think she wasn’t a kid?”Lorene Turner asked onThursday.Lorene Turner, a Dallashairstylist, said she spent a lotof time on the Internet tryingto track down Jakadrien.Ultimately, the girl wasfound in Bogota by the DallasPolice Department with helpfrom Colombian and U.S.officials.Dallas Police detectiveC’mon (pronounced Simone)Wingo, the detective in chargeof the case, said she wascontacted in August by thegirl’s grandmother, who saidJakadrien had posted “kindof disturbing” messages on aFacebook account where shegoes by yet another name.Wingo said the girl waslocated in early Novemberthrough her use of a com-puter to log into Facebook.Relatives were then put intocontact with the U.S. embas-sy in Bogota to provide pic-tures and documents to proveJakadrien’s identity.Colombian officials saidwhen the government discov-ered she was a U.S. citizenand a minor, it put her underthe care of a welfare pro-gram.
t
Task force serves warrantsfor bath sales, syntheticmarijuana
Couple fnds
wedding ring indog’s stomach
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.(AP) — A couple has found asuspect in the disappearance of their $4,500 wedding ring —their basset hound.KOB-TV reportedWednesday that a veterinarianrecently removed the ring fromthe dog named Coraline afterX-rays showed it was lodgeddeep in her stomach and wasn’tcoming out on its own.Albuquerque residentRachelle Atkinson says sheand her husband Scott hadsearched everywhere for thering before beginning to sus-pect the dog ate it.
i’ a mad, mad, mad wld
The Delphos Herald - YourNo. 1 source for local news
 
(Continued from page 1)
During the later hoursof the evening, Siefkerstopped a car in the Villageof Vaughnsville only to findthere was an active warrantfrom an adjacent county forthe driver. While dispatchwas confirming the warrantand arranging for transport,Siefker heard what sound-ed like an explosion. Afterscanning the neighborhood,Siefker observed a houseengulfed in flames a blockaway. He notified dispatch,gave instruction to the driverand ran toward the burninghome where he saw a childand two elderly females in anenclosed porch at the front of the home trying to escape theinferno. The child and oneof the women were tryingto assist the second woman,who appeared to be handi-capped.Siefker was able to enterthe porch and carry the dis-abled woman to safety to ahouse across the street. Afterbeing informed an elderlyman was still in the house,Siefker attempted to enterthe home but was unable todue to the extreme heat andsmoke.“Kevin’s actions saved thelife of that disabled womanand possible the other twowho were trying to assisther,” Beutler said. “The dis-abled woman was treated forsmoke inhalation.”Siefker has been withthe sheriff’s department for13 years. At the time of thehouse fire, he and his wife,Alaina, had a small infantdaughter.“Kevin is person of char-acter, quiet and never com-plains. He obviously likes his job and he’s good at what hedoes. He’s fair, effective andattentive. Our communitiesare safer because he is onduty,” Beutler said. “I wish Ihad 10 of him.”Sgt. Jonathon Gray of the Van Wert Post, StateHighway Patrol, put Cook’sname in for the award.“Trooper Cook is a lead-er across the board when itcomes to combating danger-ous driving and contributingto a safer Ohio,” Sgt. Graysaid. “He is very knowledge-able in OVI enforcement andcurrent trends in criminalpatrol enforcement, includ-ing marijuana, cocaine, K-2,spice, bath salts and chemicalsbeing used as harmful intoxi-cants. He leads the Van Wertpost and Findlay District inOVI arrests with 109.”Gray went on to say Cookhas surpassed three mile-stones in 2011 and attempteda fourth. First, his 109 OVIarrests; secondly, he achievedthe first-ever ACE Award atthe Van Wert post, which is astatewide award given out forrecovering five or more sto-len cars with suspect appre-hension (he has eight); andthird, he has made 13 felonycriminal patrol apprehensions(12 currently approved). Heis also in the running forthe statewide Blue Max AutoLarceny Enforcement Award;he is currently tied for secondwith his eight.Cook was also the trooperwho initiated the capture of arolling methamphetamine labwhen he stopped to tell thedriver the vehicle was parkedtoo close to the roadway on afoggy morning in Van WertCounty. Because Cook waspaying attention, he noticedthe chemical smell comingfrom the vehicle.Hard work is also the normwith Cook.“Trooper Cook devotesmore than his fair share of patrol time to our residentcounties,” Gray said. “Heleads his shift for hours, with64.4 percent of his patrolhours spent there. He under-stands being visible and uti-lizing traffic stops where resi-dents may only see a highwaypatrol cruiser one or two timesa month is what makes him aproactive officer and directlyrelated to reducing the num-ber of serious injury crashesthat occur in our rural areas.“Cook is dedicated toenforcing crash-causing vio-lations and is committed to‘contributing to a safer Ohio’through his daily work efforts.He takes pride in his activityand staying busy throughouthis shift.”Gray went on to say Cookwas a leader and he wasconfident that when Cook ison duty, good decisions arebeing made and others canalso turn to Cook for advice.“Trooper Cook’s arrestsare of the highest quality andare focused in an effort tomake Ohio a safer place tolive,” he said.
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Saturday, January 7, 2012 The Herald –3
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B
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JUST ATHOUGHT
By SARA BERELSMAN
Your new lifeis waitingfor you
Happy New Year. Inanticipation of a New Yearand new beginnings, did youmake any NewYear’s resolutions?Only a few daysinto the New Year,many folks willfind themselvesalready strugglingto keep their reso-lutions. Many peo-ple resolve to loseweight, save more,volunteer, or stopa bad habit in thehopes of changingtheir lives for thebetter.What if your life couldchange for the better, or evenbe saved, yet it was up to theresolve of someone other thanyourself? This is reality forthe men, women and childrenin our community waiting fora lifesaving organ transplant.Parents pray for a miracle tosave their child’s life, hus-bands and wives hope for afuture with their loved one,and children dream of beingable to run and play like theirfriends.Their hopes and dreamsfor a new beginning will onlybe realized when someonemakes the decision to bean organ and tissue donor.Someone they will never meetwill forever be their hero. Canyou imagine what it must belike to have your future, orthe future of someone youlove, depend on the kindnessof a stranger, hoping someonewill help you in your time of need?Don’t let a myth or mis-conception hold you backfrom making this importantdecision. It doesn’t matterhow old you are orwhat medical con-ditions you mayhave. Everyonecan register as apotential donor.There is no costto donate and allmajor religionssupport organ andtissue donation asa final act of char-ity.Each one of ushas the power tochange someone’sworld by becoming an organand tissue donor. It takes onlya few moments to registerbut that short amount of timecould translate to a lifetimeto someone in need. Makinga resolution to save livesby joining the Ohio DonorRegistry is an easy resolutionto keep. This decision couldsave eight lives and heal up to50 more. You won’t have tocut back on calories, increaseyour workout time or com-plete that marathon.Here’s all you needto do. Go online to www.DonateLifeOhio.org and reg-ister as an organ and tissuedonor, then tell your fam-ily and friends what you’veaccomplished. Make a reso-lution to join the more thanfive million Ohioans dedi-cated to solving the shortageof organ and tissue donors inour community. Here’s to ahealthy New Year filled withnew beginnings and secondchances.
Make a resolutionto save lives
Second Chances
Arends
Why is change so hard?In so many ways, wethrive on it. We get boredwithout it. Our culture isever-evolving. We alwaysneed the newest, latest gad-get; what was popular yes-terday is not today. Nothingstays the same for long —blink and you’ll miss it. Yetwhen it comes to changingourselves, why is it so dif-ficult?I have recently made thedecision to make some lifechanges to improve myself,which has already affectedeveryone around me. Once Imade the decision — it’s beenpretty smooth but why did ittake so long to make? Everyday, people walk around allover the place, filled with theknowledge that there are veryimportant changes that theyhave to make — have to, asin, their lives depend uponit — yet they do nothing.Meanwhile, most folks arefine rolling with the punchesof technology and keepingup with the Joneses. It’s thechanges that have to do withourselves that are the scari-est of all. It’s much easier topush uncomfortable thoughtsaside and focus on someoneelse than to turn the mirroraround on ourselves.Health issues plague mil-lions of Americans. Maybeyou’re someone who knowsyou need to lose weight. Youknow it and there’s no doubtin your mind that you’d liketo. Yet, what’s stopping youfrom taking that first step?Maybe you’d like to quitsmoking. This is somethingyou know with every fiber of your being that you must do,so why aren’t you? You thinkyou should quit drinking;maybe you’ve thought thisseveral times. You somehowalways push it to the backof your mind, doing nothingto make positive changes.Why?The answer is simple. Weare creatures of habit. Changecan instill fear. By nature, weprotect ourselves from fear,keeping us in the same placewe’ve always been. We arealso impatient and lazy. Wewant instant results and wedon’t want to have to changeour routine or get out of ourcomfort zone to get there.By “we,” in all of these sce-narios, I am talking aboutme. These are all the reasonswhy I was so resistant tochange. I didn’t want to haveto actually exert any effort;I just wanted great changesto happen to me. That. Is.Never. Going. To. Happen.Never.Starting is the hardest part;taking that first step. Not thatit won’t be difficult at timesafter that but just taking thatvery first baby step is whatcounts. It reminds me of the quote by Lao Tzu: “The journey of a thousand milesbegins with one step.”It’s overwhelming tofocus on the whole process,like losing 50 pounds, neversmoking again or giving upalcohol forever. That’s whyit’s OK to focus on one day ata time and one good, positivedecision at a time. As scaredas we might be of failing, it’sOK to realize that the peoplewho matter in our lives willlove and support us no matterwhat happens. Sometimes,we are so afraid of rejec-tion that we remain inert andunhappy. We’re afraid of the unknown. Predictable =good. Maybe your changewill cost you some friendsand that’s scary. Guess what?They were never your friendsanyway.Nothing great has everhappened to anyone thatdidn’t require a lot of hardwork and dedication. Ascomfortable as it might be tostay where you are, if you’remiserable in one area of yourlife, then you can’t deny it.Taking that first step to makeit better makes all the dif-ference. The life that couldbe waiting for you is greaterthan anything you could everimagine right now. Changingyourself could make every-one around you happier, mostimportantly yourself.I know how scared I wasto take any action on my ownlife and how happy I am nowthat I did. If you’re readingthis and feel that you couldbe happier, too, I urge youto throw the pack away, dropthe bottle, begin an exerciseprogram — whatever it takesto make the change you needto make. I promise you won’tregret it. Now, go. Your newlife is waiting for you.
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Law
The Delphos Optimist Club honored three law enforcement officers Friday during the club’s annual Respect for Law “Law Enforcement Officer of the Year” presentation at the A&W Restaurant. Participating in the program were, from left, Sgt. Jonathan Gray of the Van Wert Post, State HighwayPatrol; Trooper Shawn Cook (first runner-up) and his daughter, Kiya; Delphos Assistant Police Chief and Lead Detective Dave Clark (winner) andPolice Chief Kyle Fittro; Putnam County Sheriff James Beutler; and Alaina and Sheriff’s Deputy Kevin Siefker (second runner-up).
Report: Movementally illyouth fromOhio lockups
COLUMBUS (AP) — Thestate should transfer mentallyill juvenile inmates to psychi-atric facilities as soon as pos-sible and find money for theirtreatment, according to a newreport on the status of Ohio’syouth prison system.The Department of YouthServices holds some of themost acutely mentally illyouth in the state, who wouldbe transferred to more appro-priate psychiatric treatmentfacilities if they were hos-pitalized or in other settingsoutside detention, the reportsaid.The report filed in feder-al court Thursday also saidrepeatedly placing mentallyill youth in seclusion affectsdecisions about whether theyshould be held beyond the endof their sentences.Under a court settlement,Youth Services must “striveto prevent deterioration orexacerbation of mental healthsymptoms and needless isola-tion for behaviors caused bymental health issues,” accord-ing to the report by court-appointed monitors WillHarrell and Terry Schuster.Youth Services and a stateinteragency committee onmental health and juvenile jus-tice are looking at long-termfixes. Thursday’s report raisedthe point of more immediateaction.The state said it “providescomprehensive behavioralhealth services” to youthincluding two mental healthunits for boys and one forgirls, each staffed with full-time psychologists and socialworkers, according to DYSspokeswoman Andrea Kruse.Ohio has procedures tomove mentally ill offendersto psychiatric hospitals, Krusesaid, but added: “because of the violent behavior that manyof the youth present, it is oftendifficult to find placement.”The report is the thirdannual summary reviewingYouth Services’ efforts tomake prisons safer followinga 2004 lawsuit that alleged aculture of violence.
Tiger cubs togo on display atToledo zoo
TOLEDO (AP) — Twotiger cubs are making theirpublic debut at a northernOhio zoo.The Toledo Zoo says visi-tors can now see the maleand female cubs born in lateSeptember.Zoo officials say the pairare continuing to gain inweight and are moving aroundmore every day.The zoo says Viktor and hissister Talya were given namesthat reflect the eastern Russiaprimary habitat of the criti-cally endangered Amur tigers,formerly known as Siberiantigers.
Ohio judge OKsPI in teen death
CINCINNATI (AP) — Asouthwest Ohio judge hasgranted a request by a defenseattorney to hire a privateinvestigator to look into thedeath of a youth who authori-ties say was fatally beaten bya fellow group home resident.A 17-year-old boy wascharged with murder lastmonth following the death of 16-year-old Anthony Parker.Police say Parker was body-slammed to the floor and hithis head at the nonprofit OneWay Farm home in Fairfield.WKRC-TV in Cincinnatireports a Butler County juve-nile judge on Friday allowedthe hiring of an investigatorto look into events before andafter the alleged assault.

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