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Table Of Contents

T. M. KNOX
THESE lectures are devoted to Aesthetics. Their topic is the
If we now ask about the kind of scientific treatment [of art] we
Hirt's artistic principle. What does he prefer? In the first place he
But this aspect²external existence²is not what makes a work
Introduction to Part I]
V correctness of the imitation. The object and content of the
But [on this view] such a stimulus is not given in this field by
Kant propounds `purposiveness' or teleology. In the concept of
These we may take to be the chief results of Kant's Critique of
In these Letters the chief point from which Schiller starts is that
W. and Friedrich von Schlegel, (48) greedy for novelty in the
Solger (53) and Ludwig Tieck (54) who adopted irony as the
The Ideal is not to be thus understood. For any content can be
POSITION OF ART IN RELATION TO THE
Plato opposed the gods of Homer and Hesiod starkly enough. With
CONCEPT OF THE BEAUTIFUL AS SUCH
We called the beautiful the Idea of the beautiful. This means
Rumohr in his Italienische Forschungen.(2) It starts from the
The beautiful is the Idea as the immediate unity of the Concept
This is the Concept's first mode of existence. Its distinctions (1)
B. THE EXTERNAL BEAUTY OF THE ABSTRACT
FORM AND THE ABSTRACT UNITY OF THE
SENSUOUS MATERIAL
I. THE IDEA OF ARTISTIC BEAUTY
E.] von Weber's Der Freischiitz [1821]. Laughing as such is an
In the like sense the beggar boys of Murillo (in the Central
Winckelmann. But it is the eternal merit of Winckelmann to have
II. ACTION
The Homeric heroes are of a similar type. Of course they too
Schiller's Braut von Messina [1803] can rightly exclaim: 'There is
Schadow's Girl binding on her Sandals (45)is of course caught in
Concept of the Ideal has vanished. Of course one could suppose
Concept of the Ideal. The concern of the ideal individual must be
Iphigenia [his daughter] and thereby commits a transgression
chapter alone would provide an occasion for discussions of endless
Odyssey [iii et al.] as the escort of Telemachus. This escort is more
Wherein I'll catch the conscience of the King
In this matter too Goethe and Schiller provide a striking
Athenians could have been fed from the mantle of Pallas Athene
section on The Heroic Age], the great advantage that this departure
Enter Georg with a rhone [a gutter taking rain from the roof]:
Georg: The rain may look for another way. I am not
Indies round the Cape of Good Hope and the infinitely important
Emperor [Augustus]
Psalms of David with their brilliant celebration of the Lord in the
In this First Part we have treated first the general Idea of the
(a) Mere manner [i.e. mannerism] must be essentially
Horace too in his Epistles adopts this manner. This is a turning of
Elizabeth's health and wipes his eyes. ² But with these mundane
DEVELOPMENT OF THE IDEAL INTO
THE PARTICULAR FORMS OF ART
(i) The Symbolic. In this the Idea still seeks its genuine
A. (a) The first stage is itself neither to be called symbolic
Section, is the symbolic form of art in its still immediate shape, a
Divine itself. Each Amshaspand (Ormuzd too is of their company
In further [Persian] ideas there is of course an advance to some
Therewith Jamshid marked out three hundred parts of the earth. He
Still less is the cult prescribed by the Zend-Avesta of a symbolic
Uranus shut up in Tartarus. Gaia induces Cronus to unman Uranus;
(b) A further type of symbolical presentation is Isis and Osiris
Now the first decisive purification of the absolute [meaning]
God. In this connection Psalm 104 [2 ff.] is of magnificent power
CONSCIOUS SYMBOLISM OF THE
COMPARATIVE ART-FORM
The same naïveté is found in many of the poems called
Shakespeare's Henry IV when old Northumberland asks the
But when Richard II has to atone for the youthful frivolity of his
Still more splendidly Brutus in Julius Caesar says in his rage
In such a case I am not the interpreter or inspirer of nature; I feel
Section. For classical beauty has for its inner being the free
(4)Of a similar kind is the witty French saying: 'God made men in
THE PROCESS OF SHAPING THE
CLASSICAL ART-FORM
Egyptian coins he stands beside Horus. In general the association
In the oracle the content [of what is declared] lies in the
At greater length Plato relates the myth of Prometheus in the
Prometheus to let him make the division himself. 'When I have
Eumenides] pursue Orestes on account of his mother's murder
Baubo whom Goethe sets careering over the Blocksberg on a
Scholiast [on 1. 56] adds that 'in the Academy too Prometheus was
Nevertheless Plutarch [Isis and Osiris § 64] thinks it would be
Egypt but] from Cadmus the Tyrian and the Phoenicians who came
Aeschylus in his Prometheus presents the wanderings of Io [11
Greeks before Troy. This pre-eminence of the hero he expresses by
Achilles [according to Plutarch] and praised his good fortune in
When in this invisibility he helps King Gunther in his contest with
For [in Greece the] spiritual individuality [of the gods] does
While you may be as spiritually animated as you like by [Greek]
Absolute. For the Greeks what was affirmative was only the life
The entire content [of romantic art] is therefore concentrated on the
In the classical Ideal the Divine is on the one hand restricted to
(a) While therefore the Person of Christ as such is frequently
Since we defined the Concept of the Ideal as the reconciliation
The artist's way of treating [these subjects] may indeed be
But when the Kingdom of God has won a place in the world and is
Friedrich von Schlegel's Alarcos [1802] we have this ice-cold and
187] in the relation between Zeus and the other gods. The overlord
THE FORMAL INDEPENDENCE OF
INDIVIDUAL CHARACTERISTICS
Now while imagination [in the East] creates the meaning from its
Cawdor; and shalt be what thou art promised. Yet do I fear thy
Quixote what we previously eulogized in Shakespeare. Cervantes
Divine is the absolute subject-matter of art. But the Divine had to
Goethe in his West-Ostliche Divan. Goethe's poems in the Divan
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Lectures on Fine Arts by Hegell

Lectures on Fine Arts by Hegell

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