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Alex and His Amazing Watercolor Dreamcoat

Alex and His Amazing Watercolor Dreamcoat

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Published by Maya Contreras
Excerpt from 'The DDD Funny Issue' on iPad now.
Excerpt from 'The DDD Funny Issue' on iPad now.

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Categories:Topics, Art & Design
Published by: Maya Contreras on Jan 09, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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01/09/2012

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issue three
257
fall 
 
2011 :
the 
ddd
256
the 
ddd : fall 
 
2011
Alexis
and His amazingWatercolor dreamcoat
Interview by 
MARY TALATO
Photographs by 
ROBBIE POWELL
chapter five
 
issue three
259
fall 
 
2011 :
the 
ddd
258
the 
ddd : fall 
 
2011
DDD:
 
You are a watercolor artist, and an amazingly 
talented one at that. What is it you like about it? 
 aa:
I've always loved the look of watercolor. There's a texture you get from it that's impossibleto create in other mediums. It has the [reputation]of being quite traditional as there are not many contemporary artists who choose to use it(although that…is changing more everyday). It'sone of the more unique of the painting mediums,in my opinion.
DDD:
 
How do you choose your themes? 
 aa:
As most anyone could probably guess by taking even a cursory look at my past work, I havea leaning towards pulpy material. I'm obsessed
 with mosters. I always have bee. Eve as a
child, the things I would draw on my TrapperKeeper would be all sorts of different scary things. At my most recent exhibit, my theme was classicmovie monsters. It’s an obvious inspiration for meI guess, but there's something about the monstersfrom that era that modern creature designs justdon't have.DDD:
Your more recent celebrity paintings for the last issue of DDD were quite delicate in style. You even added some 
splashes of color in there…which is unusual for you, yes? 
 
 aa:
Yes ad yes. I started experimetig with
a lighter use of watercolor, and lightening evenfurther in post to create a ghostly, subdued look,but yet keeping some areas like the eyes and mouthdarker and more detailed to highlight certainfacial characteristics and qualities. I did add colorbecause I felt that it needed something to bring itto life. A certain something that was missing— perhaps a soul to the image. Traditionally, I'm notan extremely colorful person. I mean, I used tobe goth. Personally, I just think watercolor lends
Three years ago, I spotted him in New York. There was something a little different about him—hard to place. And I liked it. That’s how I met Alexis Ayala.
 Artist and writer Ayala has recently moved halfway around the world, from his pre-war loft in Brooklyn to a leafy 
sun-drenched space in sunny Sydney. It's a long way from the hustle and bustle of New York, but somehow, this misplaced character ts perfectly. I guess he’s gotten quite used to it. After all, everybody knows the Puerto Rican  population in the Midwest is close to zero, and that’s where Alexis was born and raised.
itself to monochromatics naturally, more so thanother mediums. I prefer monochromatic art, and with watercolors I love the results it gives me. I’mnot going to restrict myself in any way, though. If 
color works, the why ot use it?
DDD:
 
The ne details in some of your paintings are 
sometimes mistaken for pencil work or even photography.How do you achieve this look? 
 
 aa:
By sacrice. I have a store of virgis that I
burn at an altar every time I paint. Also, I use a very small brush and paint slowly. But mostly it'sbecause of the water. Doing a wash and slowly adding color into it can create very natural-feeling skin textures and gradients for shadows as the paintdiffuses into the water. This can take me a long time as I usually work from light to dark very, very slowly.DDD:
 Not many people know that you are also a writer as well as an artist. What do write about? What do you like to write? 
 aa:
Since moving to Sydney, I have been focusedmore in media—writing about technology and video games, producing and hosting a podcast forthe site capsulecomputers.com.I’m still in the process of creating children's books,
both writig ad illustratio. You could say they arelargely iueced by the styles of Shel Silverstei
and Dr. Seuss, where everything rhymes. I don'tknow why, but I love rhyming. I've always had asoft spot for stories that rhyme, so I tend to do alot of that. Writing children's books allows me to write about seemingly absurd things and get away  with it. Where else can you write about an eight-foot furry monster named Charles with a balloon
amed Bob as his best fried?
chapter five
 
issue three
261
fall 
 
2011 :
the 
ddd
260
the 
ddd : fall 
 
2011
 aLphaBet monsters ‘B’.
Illustration By 
aLexis ayaLa  aLphaBet monsters ‘e’.
Illustration By 
aLexis ayaLa 
chapter five

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