Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
No taxes, no bother - life on Lake Titicaca and offshore California

No taxes, no bother - life on Lake Titicaca and offshore California

Ratings: (0)|Views: 24|Likes:
Published by Alex Modzelewski
The ancient way of life on Lake Titicaca and the seasteading movement offshore California share similar philosophy-- no taxes, no bother. The floating islands of Uros, Peru, have served as home for the aborigine pioneers in politically independent living for ages, now an artificial island offshore California may advance the idea in a more convenient fashion.
The ancient way of life on Lake Titicaca and the seasteading movement offshore California share similar philosophy-- no taxes, no bother. The floating islands of Uros, Peru, have served as home for the aborigine pioneers in politically independent living for ages, now an artificial island offshore California may advance the idea in a more convenient fashion.

More info:

Published by: Alex Modzelewski on Jan 14, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOCX, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/15/2012

pdf

text

original

 
 Nobody bothers us here, the Indianwoman confessed in a hushed voice, hereyes stubbornly clinging to the reed floor.Beneath the layer of vegetable materialthe frigid water flew freely, as we stoodat the edge of her floating island.Uros, Peru, is a bunch of small islandseasily seen on satellite images (check Google maps) but missing on topographicmaps. Their phantom-like behavior stemsfrom the islets nature; they are nothingmore than heaps of totora reeds floatinglike big rafts in the blue waters of Lake Titicaca. To build and maintaining such astructure is no small job because stalks and roots decompose in fresh water rapidly.To prevent the possibility of waking up in icy water during a sudden Andean storm,the islands require new layers of reeds built in with unfailing diligence.Needless to say, the islanders lifestyle is seriously cramped. A whole family lives in asingle-room reed hut; cooking takes place outside on a stone-lined fire platform.Electric power, phone service, running water and any other imaginable conveniencerequiring a conduit or a pipe are all out of question. The closest utility provider is inPuno, a port city about an hour away by a fast motorboat. Younger children areferried to one of the neighborhood islands for schooling, but teenagers have to travelto the mainland.Lots of trouble, I thought. It should note here that the islanders are not opposed tomodern conveniences on ideological grounds, like for example Amish. No, under theirlimited circumstances, they grab whatever scrap of the twenty-first centurytechnology they can. I spied a solar panel stuck on the southern wall of a hut, whichaccording to its proud owner, could power a small TV set.What makes this wet, cold, uncomfortable location worthwhile? I wondered. Theycould easily move onto the rocky shore where the logistics of their daily existencewould be so much easier.Ice separating this bearded gringo and a native lady displaying her souvenirs brokewith a little ploy of amiable haggling over a toy canoe. Her obligatory bowler hat shook in appreciative giggle at my attempt of a joke, and a minute later, my newfriend answered my loaded question with one brief sentence, Nobody bothers ushere. She delivered this perfect synopsis of a big explanation with a shrug, thenadded in even softer voice, after having swept the area with alert eyes, No taxes, nopolice, no noise 
 
Good enough for me, I thought. I might try these islands myself  if they could bemade a bit more comfortable. And here comes The Seasteading Institute with its plansfor modern homes floating in the oceanic waters. The ancient escape-from-a-botherschemesuitable only for the individuals prepared for the reed-island lifestylesoonmay become a realistic option for the rest of us.Would anyone of sound mind want to stray from the comforts of dry land? Yes, thereis no question in my mind. A hard core of nomadic sailors, who respond to no one,slosh across the planets waters in search of independence right now. Their numberswould greatly multiply if the freewheeling lifestyle of boating could be altered to offeropportunities for gainful work and better creature comforts. The oceanic settlementsenvisioned by The Seasteading Institute provide these upgrades.Many individuals, who would never consider stepping into a boat, will be drawn toartificial islands or platforms lured by the opportunity to live and work outside anygovernments reach. Many of the most productive and imaginative entrepreneurs andworkers, not criminals or fugitives, have anarchistic instincts and display tendenciesthat might induce them to try one of those modern-day floating islands. Therefreeto deal, wheel and take risksthey might spin new exotic business ideas andestablish new centers of knowledge industry.There is an additional benefit to having those new communities; many wild-eyedfreedom ideas bouncing now across the Internet and smoke-filled basements could befield-tested on the artificial islands without outside interference. An anarchists refugecould become a social laboratory, where new ways of social living could be measuredagainst beliefs and needs of a living community rather than dusty libraries of centuries-old laws. Best of all, they would not thrive or perish because of a powerfulpoliticians whim but by a dictate of the laws of economy.Where else can a place be found where a meddling hand of a government will not reach? Nowhere on the existing land, I am afraid, but the oceans  yes, the oceans stilloffer this freedom and the seasteading movement might be the best way to take thisopportunity. A fantasy, many will say, but this is what J. Vernes submarine was called.Undoubtedly, the seasteadingstill a very unorthodox ideawill aspire ridicule anddoubt for long time, the recent Colbert shows lampooning of the offshore islandsserving as an example.The dismissive giggle may soon be disrupted by Blueseed, an enterprise dedicated tobuilding a platform twelve miles off the shores of Northern California. This structureis supposed to provide home and place of work for computer scientists the SiliconValley needs but cannot get due to vagaries of the U.S. immigration policies. WhetherBlueseed will be a successful enterprise or not, thanks to governmental restrictions,the list of business opportunities on the high seas is long.Scorn and disbelief mean very little for the seasteading movement because,ultimately, any enterprises success will depend on a small number of cool-headed

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->