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The Fault in Our Stars Kindle Edition Book Review

The Fault in Our Stars Kindle Edition Book Review

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Published by HotPlugIn
In The Fault in Our Stars, John Green has created a soulful novel that tackles big subjects--life, death, love--with the perfect blend of levity and heart-swelling emotion. Hazel is sixteen, with terminal cancer, when she meets Augustus at her kids-with-cancer support group. The two are kindred spirits, sharing an irreverent sense of humor and immense charm, and watching them fall in love even as they face universal questions of the human condition--How will I be remembered? Does my life, and will my death, have meaning?--has a raw honesty that is deeply moving. --Seira Wilson
In The Fault in Our Stars, John Green has created a soulful novel that tackles big subjects--life, death, love--with the perfect blend of levity and heart-swelling emotion. Hazel is sixteen, with terminal cancer, when she meets Augustus at her kids-with-cancer support group. The two are kindred spirits, sharing an irreverent sense of humor and immense charm, and watching them fall in love even as they face universal questions of the human condition--How will I be remembered? Does my life, and will my death, have meaning?--has a raw honesty that is deeply moving. --Seira Wilson

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Published by: HotPlugIn on Jan 16, 2012
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07/27/2013

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 Learn More About this Book Here:http://s.hotplugin.com/The-Fault-in-Our-Stars The Fault in Our Stars Kindle Edition book reviewBest Books of the Month, January 2012: In The Fault in Our Stars, John Green hascreated a soulful novelthat tackles big subjects--life, death, love--with the perfect blend of levityand heart-swelling emotion.Hazel is sixteen, with terminal cancer, when she meets Augustus ather kids-with-cancer support group.The two are kindred spirits, sharing an irreverent sense ofhumor and immense charm, and watchingthem fall in love even as they face universal questionsof the human condition--How will I beremembered? Does my life, and will my death, havemeaning?--has a raw honesty that is deeply moving.--Seira WilsonReviewAn electric portrait of young people who learn to live life with one foot in thegrave. Filled withstaccato bursts of humor and tragedy, The Fault in Our Stars takes a spin on universalthemes--Will I be loved? Will I be remembered? Will I leave a mark on this world?--by dramaticallyraisingthe stakes for the characters who are asking.--Jodi Picoult, author of My Sisters Keeper and SingYou Home"A novel of life and death and the people caught in between, The Fault in Our Stars is JohnGreenat his best. You laugh, you cry, and then you come back for more." -- Markus Zusak, bestsellingandPrintz Honor winning author of The Book Thief "John Green writes incredible, honest truths about thesecret, weird hearts of human beings. Hemakes me laugh and gasp at the beauty of a sentence or thetwist of a tale. He is one of the bestwriters alive and I am seething with envy of his talent." --E. Lockhart,National Book Award Finalistand Printz Honorwinning author of The Disreputable History of FrankieLandau Banks and TheBoyfriend List This review is from: The Fault in Our Stars (Hardcover)Spoilerfree! Although his brother Hank might argue that the real "fault in our stars" is that our suncontainslimited amounts of hydrogen, which will cause it to eventually run out of the only fuelsourcecapable of supporting its mass against gravity, thereby expanding until its outer shell envelops
 
ourtiny planet and consumes it in a fiery death, I think it is more likely that John Green's title refers toaline from Shakespeare's Julius Caesar: "The fault, dear Brutus is not in our stars, / But in ourselves, thatwe are underlings." Caesar (I, ii,140-141) What does this quote mean and how does it relate to a novelabout two kids dying of cancer? I'llexplore that below.The Fault in Our Stars is the story of two 16-year-olds who meet at a cancer support group.HazelLancaster, the narrator, is afflicted with terminal thyroid cancer which has ravaged herlungsenough to necessitate the use of an oxygen tank wherever she goes. It is during a supportmeetingthat she is introduced to Augustus Waters, whose leg was claimed by a malignant bonetumor and whosoon becomes the object of her affection. When I learned of the plot of this novel, I was initially a bitturned off. I'm reminded of a comment afriend made when I asked her if she wanted to go see themovie 50/50, upon which she exclaimed"who wants to go see a movie about people dying of cancer?" Icouldn't come up with asatisfactory response, and we settled for a two-hour movie about thecompetitive world of robotfighting (which still caused me to shed a tear). So why would anyone,especially young adults,want to read about "cancer kids?" As Hazel herself states in the novel, "cancerbooks suck." But"The Fault in Our Stars" isn't about cancer, and it's not about death. Cancer is animportantsubject in the book, but it's not nearly as important as the characters. The disease is mainlyusedas a vehicle for moving along the development of Hazel and Augustus. In the absence of teenwizards, dystopian death races, and swooning vampire/werewolf feuds, it allows us to viewtheprotagonists in a more complex setting than the traditional high school drama. It also forcesthecharacters to grow up much faster than they should, which I think is important for Green'saudienceas well as his needs as a writer. The "young adult" label should not be cause fordismissal to olderaudiences. As equally evident in his previous novels, Green's writing is notdumbed-down in an attemptto cater to a misguided adult notion of the intelligence of teenagers.While Hazel and Augustus certainlyshare in the same adolescent interests as many of their peers,their dialogue is written at a levelthat betrays a deeper level of maturity. Amidst trips to the malland countless video game sessions, thecharacters expound on subjects in life that everyonefaces. While it might seem strange to hear a 16-year-old use words like "cloying" and "sobriquet,"this is par for the course in a John Green novel. Andstrangely, it works very well (provided youkeep a dictionary handy). Even though I initially balked atreading a "young adult" title (I'm well intoadulthood), I realized that just because a book is marketedtoward adolescents, doesn't mean itcan't be enjoyed by those outside that niche. I'm hesitant to makethe comparison, but "The Faultin our Stars" bridges the age gap in the same vein as Salinger's TheCatcher in the Rye. Itcontains content and themes thoroughly relatable to a young audience, while beingpresented in away that adults will appreciate. Green's characters always come off a bit stiff to me andstart off sounding like pretentious jerkswho are trying too hard to grow up, but I always warm up tothem and end up relating to them bythe middle of the novel. Gus was no exception. However myopinion of him changed as early aschapter 2, and I knew as soon as I heard him have a conversation withHazel about theircounselor's incorrect usage of the word "literally" (a fact that had literally beenbothering me sinceit was mentioned in the first chapter) that I knew we could be friends. The likeability

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