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Air Force News ~ Jul-Dec 1923

Air Force News ~ Jul-Dec 1923

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Published by CAP History Library
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Published by: CAP History Library on Jan 17, 2012
Copyright:Public Domain

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03/25/2014

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VOL. V~I A I R
'inf~t~i;;
Division'Air Service
------~
---
~~e~~._tj
~~i--Le-~~d~
E
E R
V I
C ~ NEW S LET T E R
V I
No.
13
Munitions Building
JU1~ 10, 1923
Washington. D.C.The purpose of this 'letter is to keep the personnel of the Air Service, bothin Washington and in the field, informed as to the activities of the Air Servicein general, and for release to the public press.FORRE~ASE July
12.
1923.
,
.
LIEUT~ CROCKER'SBORDERTOBORDERNON-STOPFLIGHTThe official report
ort
the non-st op flight froln the .Gu.lt',of Mexico toOtheCanadian Border, made by Lieut. H.G. Crocker, Army Air Service, on May 26th, dis-closes s6veralanteresting facts. Lieut. Crocker took off fro~ E1lington Field,H-ouston, Texas, at 5:20 a.m. Central Time, flew to the Gulf, and then turned north"ward. He states that while passing Middlefork, La., the clouds became so low thatthe plane just cleared the tree tops. At this time;' also the &ngine began to miss'and splutter for about five minutes, due in all propability to some foreign sub-stance momentarily clogging the gas line. This was soon cleared, however,. and theengine never again faltered during the remainder o
"be
flight to Selt'ridge FielQ~Lieut. Crocker's report is as follows:"Having been selected to make the Gulf to Border flight, different routes
were
studied and test flights were made in th~ DH-4B-l-S plane A.S. No. 22-353 which wasto be used. Weather maps were
consulted
dH5.1y. ,The course decided on was
f
r o.c
'Sllin/;t en
Field t
4)
the waters of, the Gulf,thence to the Border just below Detroit, Michigan, landing at Selfridge Field,This distance was greater than from
at.her
cities on the Gulf, but owing to the factthat a large, smooth field 'Nas
ne
cesaar
y
for the take off, Ellingto~ Field wasselected as the start ing
PCii".t
e , '~.'
In preparing the map
u
sed, the
c
our-se
was
marked on each state traversed.,
and
the desired sections were
mour.t
ed on
a
linen str;i.p 'one foot by twelve (eet, theends of which were attached
-
0
two
sma
lL
r
:>llerseigh;t inches apart in an aluminumframe. This map. showing :::om fif-f:,y
to one
hundred miles on each side of thecourse" was found quite
ne.ce
aas.r
y ,
eepe
cLal
Iy
when varying .from the original course
I
in storm areas. The total
d
i
st
ence
~(,o 
be
Eown was divided into fifty mile sec- ,tiona and the total mileage
was
di.Jtinetly
marked on each division. This map c,auldbe placed in the lap, on
the side
of the
seat
or hung on the side of the fuselage.The plane was
e
qu
i
ppedwith
a
: : i
ong opi.L
spring attached to,t~e left
rudder .
the tension of which
c
oulc
co
ad
Ju~i
ed to, eJ.imir:r.:te the, c~psta~:t,. ,slight pre,sBureusually necessary on the
rj,g~:~ ru:lc"p.T.
A . .
s~r.all folding" d~sk.Jor
1 3 "
pad was placedon the right side on whic~~
tc rnak
e not es ,
r!1ip
t~ermo6 bottles"oreforwater theother for coffee, were
car-r-Led
e
V;icf1
a main, ~apk capacity.
of 2~0
ga,llons and ~.'reserve o
28
gallons of gasoline, with 24 ga~lonB, of oil, the plane was. ready forthe flight. ' '"There being no supplies at Ellington Field, a flight was made to that stat~onWednesday, May
23.
to arrange for the servicing of the plan~, receiving the latestweather forecasts and securing accommodations for the proposed flight. Becausethe gasoline capacity was only sufficient for tpirteen hours and th~ minimum dis-tance to be travelled
was
approximately
1200
miles) the winds and their velodity,were the most important items to be considered in determ;ning the favorablenessof the weather predictions.The weather map for Friday, May 25. showed fair c,on9i"j:.i9ns over the countryto be covered and the predictions for Saturday were more favorable. The plane wasserviced and flown to Ellington Field Friday and reservicedt.here with70gallonsof commercial gasoline and 4 gallons of oil. Celt
:Oh~1
H.How?!,d, 'Commanding Officer of Kelly Field, capt.
Ohas ,
B.
B.
Bubb.,L.i.eut.s. George Roberson,i, Leland
S.
Andrews and R.D. Biggs,
ar-r
Ived to witness and assist i~,~~e take off. ,
The following weather
f
ore cas't was received from Wal?h:lngton, D.C. at
9~,30
p.m. Friday, and it was definitely decided to take off the followingmorning~
V-4880.
A.S.
~--~
---'~.~
 
'Observer, Hou,~ton, Texas.
",:? ,
'Partly cloudy sky with possibility of widely scattered thundershowers Satur-day inLot~isiana and eastern Texa'.s'.N~rth of Louisiana to Detroit .there will becloudy sky with local rains and s.catterod thundershowers. The winds will be gentleto moderate variable over south portion and gentle to moderate, east to southeastfarther north up to two thousand feet. ' ,Signed- Mitchell.Forecaster.Weather Bureau'The take off was made at 5:20 a.m., central time, shortly after dawn, Aftertouching the waters of the Gulf,.''the course then taken was' 20° with a west windand visibility only fair. R.P.M. 1500j temp. 850i oil-pressure; 48 Ibsj altitude,
1800'
ft.;
speed 97
M.P.H~ :~.
The R.P.M. for the entire flight was kapt at '1500, While the oil pressurevaried from 48 Ibs. at the start to 25 lbs. for the last 500 milos. Ao the gasolinesupplt'diminishad't'he air speed increased frbm'97 M.P.H. at the start to 103 M.P.H.at the" 'end•....
!
In ordet that 'a check could be made on the plane's flying, the performance
of
the engi~e and all instruments, and a double check on the course as taken, Lieut.Andrews, who had assisted in the plans and preparations for the flight, escortedthe plane for about 150 miles. ' . ,.,;'At 5:30 a.m. the sun rose and seemed
t
a
bring with it a 'haze that coveted the.earth. Near the Sabine river at 7:05 a.m. clouds began to gather. The loggingrailroads of this 'territory.were quite confusing. \Vhile passing Middlefork, La., the clouds became so low that the plane was just clearing the tree tops. Also
at
this time the engine missed and sputtered forabout 5 minutes due, it was thought, to some
f
or-eLgn substance in the gasolineline. This soon was cleared and t he engine
neve,-
again
3.1
t ered.A ciimb of 2000 ft. thru the clouds was made and a compass course followedfor one hour. the height of the clouds gradually increasing to 3000
It: ."
Glidingthru the cloude a ceiling of 500 ft. was found.
A
deviation of fivo'miles to thewest had been made during this compass course. The wind had swung to 'the, soutlland the
cour-se
was changed to 30°. . ~.From then on for about 800 miles between 20 and 30 rain st orms were'encoun:'tered "on the
e
our-se, 'taking from
3,
t:o 20
mi.rnrt
es to fly thru them, but tho.s'~ 'm~resevere- were flown around. This made it more d:..fEcult to check the course,
es-' .
pecia11y with
!1
low ceil~ng, poor visibility and flyi.nS at 150 to 500 ft. 'alti~uae.Due to storms there was at one time a deviation o
30 mi.Le
s
f
r omthe
cour-se
s
. start City, Ark., was passed at 9:15 a.m.;
:!Ol''c0et
C;i:t.y~ .JI.r'k~,
at
lO:l5
a.m.jMississippi River was crossed five times, the first at Ca'('ru'l;hc...;:;-,-ille,
ir't.)., ,
andttfe last at Belmont, Mo., between 11:30 a.m..
and 11:50
e..D,;
-thG
Ohjo
kiver
wascrossed at Metropolis, Ill. at 12:05 p.m.; the Wabar.:l
n~."e~'
f::"ve
rriLea
110J.1'
itsmouth at 12:50 p.m.; Washington, Ind., passed at
:L:::~S,.,D.;
Spencer,
'I!1d.j'
at '1:50p.m.; Indianapolis, Ind. at 2:20 p.m.; MunCie, In;~,
dS
2=5~)
p.r.l.;
DeLphos ,
ORio'at 3:20 p.rn.j Toledo, Ohio at 4:25 p.m. The
C:[X,L..Ll:i.~Yf 
3'.l:::'derwas '~ouchGd
ab
oirt
vone
mile from Gordon,
Orrt
ar'Lo, across from Trenton,
i.;j
cn
at 4:49
pvm,
cerrc
ra'l time, .taking '11 hours and 29 minutee from Gulf to Border'.
Tho maan
tank 
euppl.y
gav9 ..out at 4:55 central time and the reserve was used for 20 minutes. Both men"l:.:J.lly
and
physically fatigued, a landing at Selfridge Field was made at 5:15
p..~.,
making11 hours and 55 minutes in the air.The wind 'on this flight varied greatly, with
a
west wind
e:t
the start thruTexas and Louisiana; a"south wind in Arkansas; a southeast "lind in sout her-n Ind'iana,and an east wind in the eastern past of this State. While approaching ToleG.'J, OLio,and on to Selfridge Field,' head winds from the northeast we,re
e
ncourrtered ,It was found
upon
draining all tanka that there were 19'
gaLl
ona o
guo
oLi.ne' "and 7 gallons of. '1;1 remaining, making an average hourly gasoline
'consumpt
i
on
iof 
20-3/4
gallons, 'w~:j.le the oil showed 1.42 gallons per hour. A sample of the
ail
was taken to McC'o'okField for test. .On the return trip, stops were made at McCookField, .Ohio; Scott Field, Ill.;Muskogee, Ok1a~; the flight finished at Kelly Field, Tex~si'at 5:15 ,p.m., Saturday,June
2, 1923." .
-2-
V-4880, A.S.
 
ARMY'SLARGESTAIRSHIPDESTROYED
,
,
"
 \ . J
tI'
THENNrIONALBALLOONRACE' .III luck still continues to pursue the Lighter ..than ...Air Branch of the Army'sAir Service. The TC-l,the newest and largest airship in commission, shortly uponthe conclusion of a 'cross country training flight from Scott Field, Ill., to DaYton;Ohio, was completely b~rned while attached to the mooring mast at. Fairfield. Thecause of the ship's dest.ruct aon has been attributed to either the presence ostatic electricity ir lightning~' as
a .
severe electrical
st
arm
was raging at th~,time of its dest r-uct
Lcn, ,
Fortunately, no loss of life accompanied the, disaster, although SergeantHarry Barnes, engineer, sustained a fracture of both legs, and Mr. C.R. Maranville,of the Goodr:i'chT'i,l'e''and Rubber Company,was a.l.so painfully injured.The TC-lileft Scottlt'ie
Ld
,at 10:20 A.M." and after circling ,toe ~i:e;L'dheaded, 'for Dayton, arriVing there shortly 'before six o'clock. The crt?wof the ship 'Wer~;Lieuts. Clyde A.:Kunt~,and ,Ira Koenig, pilOts; ,Sergeants Harry Barnes, F. Adams ,and Pvt. Gerald Ad.ams,\lng~neers. The'"passengers were' Captain W.B. Mayer, Li~uts.C.M. Brown, J.B. J'ordan'anjl W,J. Floo'd, student'S; and
Mr.
C.R. Maranville. 'The loss of the' TC...
L.
i~
a severe b~~wto the lighter-than-air activitiesdScott Field,'The United States ArmyAir' ,Service
Wilt'
beWail repte~ented at 'the Natipnal.Balloon Race to '~e held at 'Indianapolis
#
Ind'••
JU~y
4th. ' ~here Wi,l3.:be thr,e. ,'," 'teams from the A1t Service, each consiSt1ng of one pilot and one aide.. Wher~elare to be held under 'the auspices of the Indiariapolis Chamber of :Commerce,,underthe jurisdiction, of the Contest COJ;Dmitteeof'the Na-tiortal Aeronau~i.c,Ass~ciation" \ ,and will be governed, by the rUles and
x,-egU:J,a1;iori.~
of the Feder~'ion Aeronautique'Int erndt ionale.; , ';, ", 'The
three
winning teams will be sent t'o
1;he
International Balloop race ,to,be 'he'ld in!tussels. Belgium. on September 23rd next. The three army teams :to be.
,e n - ~ ,
tered in "the National Balloon r.ace are: (1) Capt. Lester' T.' Miller, pilot, ,an.d, ,1st Lieut. Courtland, M. Brow.n..ia~d:e:;(.2) 1st Lt,. Robert S. Olmstead,pilot,.,,and,' 1st Lt. John W. Shoptaw,aide; (3) 1st' Lt. 'James
fB~
Jordan,:: pilot, and l~
,Lt.
,Max "
F. Moyer, aide~ , .
,"i", '... ~', '
Lieut. Joseph P. Bail,y will accompanythe Army'contestant's as
thil
officialoperations officer and alternate. All the instruments't'o be used ,by the,~; ,pilots in this classic have been carefully cheQked'and calibrated un4ar
t~
super;'vision of the Instrument Section at Scatt Field. These instruments. wi).1 'be,
~X1$
o,f the primary determining factor~ in ,the race, and neither time nor effort has be~n. 'spared to makethe calibratipn as accurate as possible With the' latest' and best,testing equipment. Each pilot ..nIl' be furnished With complet'e dat'a ,copcerning,ths;correction aJld care
ot.
these instruments, so that there maybe no pDssib,ility ,o
t "
error in theiru,se. In addition, he will be furnished with one statoscop.e, ,one .altimeter, one reo(J.rdins barograph and also some'form, of "vertical speed indi9a~ors.,'Three special instruments will also be carried by'mem~ers of the army teams, one
I
special barometer and two 'sp~~i.aliverticalspeed indica:tors.
*
"r
Every_facility for the insurance
o t
success :for the Armyteams has been oon-suIted and put to work. 'MeteQrolQgicaJ,.,data :i.sbeing furnished, and every person "in the service who can
in
any way assis~ h~8 put forth every et:fort to mak~pos:- ','sible another victory
tor 
the Army. It' was this spirit of cooperation which wonthe prize last year"when Major Oscar Westover bested a large numbeof, selected"opponents. . .'CHIEFOFAIRSERVICERE'CEIVESHIS~ING'I " :General MasonM. Pa~rick, Chief of Air Service. who on June 26th qualified atBolling Field as an'airpllple Pi+ot, was the honor guest at a luncheon at the
.A!my
and Navy Club the following day, which was attended by all Air Service'officersstationed in Washington. To commemorat?the event. the officers present~d, their;chief with a set of silver wings. Lieut.-ObI. James E. Fechet" who'made
tl'1~
pre-sentation, congratulated the General on being the first Major~General ,in the ~rmywho had ever qualified as an airplane pilot , and the only 'off"icerof th~Army atthe age or. sixty to r:eceive this rating.
t.»
! . ,"
.
.
.~
...3-
.
-"
V-4880, A.S

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