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GRIDIRONCoach_DefensivePackage

GRIDIRONCoach_DefensivePackage

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Published by: Michael Schearer on Jan 18, 2012
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12/13/2012

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GRIDIRON
Coach
 www.GridironPublications.com
The GRIDIRON Coach Defensive Package 
©
 
2003 Gridiron Publications Company 
1
The GRIDIRON Coach Defensive Package
“It’s not whetheryou get knocked down.It’s whether you get up.”-Vince Lombardi
Contents
n
Clipping The Wings Of The Wing-T
(1.1.3)...........................................
2
n
Putting Pressure On The QB
(1.2.1).....................................................
6
n
Honing Your Players Tackling Fundamentals
(1.3.2)............................
9
n
Stance And Movement Drills For The LB
(1.3.3)..................................
11
n
El Camino’s Wildcat Defensive Package
(1.4.1).................................
14
n
In Pursuit Of Excellence
(2.4.1)........................................................
19
n
Maximum Pursuit - Bulldog Style
(4.1.4)...........................................
22
n
Defending The Wing-T
(4.1.5)..........................................................
24
n
Secondary Adjustments In The Eight ManFront Scheme
(7.2.2).......................................................................
27
n
“My Grandmother Tackles Better Than Us!”
(8.5.5)............................
29
n
Don’t Get Beat By One Receiver!
(8.6.1)............................................
34
n
Building A Great Defense
(6.3.2)......................................................
36
n
An Attacking Cover 2
(8.5.3)............................................................
40
n
Defensive Game Preparation At Canisius College
(8.7.5)....................
41
n
Defending The Two Tight End Set
(6.3.5)...........................................
43
n
The Wide Tackle Six: The No-Nonsense Defense
(7.5.3)....................
45
n
Limit Florida State’s Offense
(4.3.4)..................................................
47
n
From Reading To Attacking:Merging The 4-4 And The Bear 4-6
(7.1.2)........................................
52
n
Adapting The Master Defense To An Even Alignment
(9.2.1)...............
54
n
A Secondary Blueprint For Success: How We AdaptedThree Coaching Philosophies Into A SuccessfulDefensive Scheme
(8.7.3)................................................................
57
n
The String Drill
(9.4)........................................................................
60
 All rights reserved. No part of this package may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording without the written permis-sion of Gridiron Publications Company (the copyright holder).Gridiron Publications Company assumes no responsibility for unsolicited editorial or graphicmaterials. All information herein is believed to be accurate however, we cannot assume responsibility.Contributed articles represent the views of the authors and not necessarily those of the Publisher.GRIDIRON Coach Magazine is published six times a year by Gridiron Publications Company, 7Hansbrinker Court, Liberty Township, OH 45044; telephone (866) 326-2327, www.gridironpublications.com Email: Editor@Gridironpublications.com. ISSN 1071-1902. GRID-IRON Coach © 2003 Gridiron Publications Company.
T
HE
 
FOLLOWING
 
IS
 
 A 
 
COLLECTION
containing twenty one of our readers’ all-timefavorite defensive articles reprinted from various archived issues of GRIDIRONCoach Magazine. The articles and the accompanying diagrams have been recre-ated from the original publishing format for easier reading and referencing. Whether youare a longtime reader of GRIDIRON Coach or new to the magazine, we hope that you will find the assembled information in this collection helpful. As always, thanks for yourcontinued support of GRIDIRON Coach.
 
GRIDIRON
Coach
2
www.GridironPublications.com
The GRIDIRON Coach Defensive Package 
©
 
2003 Gridiron Publications Company 
Clipping The WingsOf The Wing-T
W
HEN
 
EXECUTED
 
PROPERLY 
, the wing-t can be one of mostdifficult offenses to defendagainst because it poses multiplethreats. It’s misdirection backfieldactions, down-down-kickout blockingschemes, and its deceptive quarterback ball handling are all of immediateconcern to a coach preparing his de-fense to take on the wing-t.But while its ground game may pro-vide the foundation, the most effec-tive component of the wing-t is its built in play-actionpassing threat sometimes referred to as the wings of the wing-t.To clip those wings and slow down this high poweredpass offense, four areas are critical:Making good readsRecognizing keysMaintaining good defensive techniqueDevelopment of appropriate coverage schemes
Educating Your Players on the Wing-T 
 When preparing to face wing-t offenses, the initial step is tofamiliarize your players with what is coming. The wing-tpassing attack can be broken down into four categories:boot passes, option passes, sprintout passes and drop back passes. In this article, we will concentrate specifically ondefending the traditional wing-t boot passes (play actionpass where the QB brings the ball opposite the backfieldflow and attacks the flank). The two types of boot passesemployed by the wing-t are the waggle (boot) pass and thecounter (boot) pass.
 The Waggle Boot Pass
The waggle pass comes off the buck sweep action. As withall of the wing-t play action passes, the QB is told to attack the flank and look to run first and pass second. Therefore,the first priority of the upfront defensive people is contain-
By Stephen Spagnuolo
Defensive CoordinatorThe University of Connecticut
“...The mosteffective component ofthe wing-t is its built inplay-action passingthreat sometimesreferred to as the wingsof the wing-t..”
ment of the QB. All waggle boot pass patterns generally attack the following five coverage areas:Front side flatDeep outside flatDeep middle or middle hook (depending on coverage)Deep throwbacBackside flat (throwback)Stress to your coverage personnel that some receiver willattack each of these five areas on the waggle boot, regardlessof the offensive formation. Examples of typical patterns areillustrated in diagram one.
Counter Boot Pass
The counter boot pass is run off of the counter trap action.The QB again attacks the flank with a run/pass option.However, he loses one of his pass receivers who becomespart of the pass protection (diagram two).
Pass Coverage vs. Wing-T 
Because of the complexities in educating your defense onthe wing-t, it’s important to stay basic in your game planand coverages. At UCONN, we stay with two basic cover-ages a basic cover three scheme (three-deep) and a two-deeplook that we call
cover five inside 
(diagram three). A very important concept that we stress to all pass de-fenders is that versus any boot pass both of these coveragesbecome “match up zone” coverages (very similar to basket-ball match-up zones). In other words, we instruct our cov-erage personnel to play man-to-man versus the receiverthreat in each area. We instruct our players to ‘hug up” thereceiver in each area and deny the ball. This is a very aggres-sive style of man within a zone principle.
Cover Three Reads
Keys by position vs. Boot 
Inside linebackers (H and B) versus the wing-t, your insidelinebackers should read the offensive guards for direction.Instruct your inside linebackers that if they see the QB andguard pulling in the same direction to think boot and drivefor depth.
 
GRIDIRON
Coach
 www.GridironPublications.com
The GRIDIRON Coach Defensive Package 
©
 
2003 Gridiron Publications Company 
3
The playside linebacker
should drive for the frontside curlarea positioning himself over the top of the flat threat (full-back). The backside linebacker must read boot directionand drive for a position directly over the ball. He must wheel back and find his pass threat (the read route) comingfrom the backside. He should position himself at a depthdependent upon the depth of the read route and “hug up”to that receiver (match up). Versus a three-deep coverage, with a free saftey in the deep middle, the read route willconvert to a hook. We do not give the linebackers a desig-nated depth in terms of yards. Their depth is determined by the receivers route (diagram four).
Diagram One - A
Flat Deep Flat Read RouteDeep ThrowbackThrowback(Flat)
Diagram One - B
Throwback(Flat)Deep ThrowbackRead RouteDeep Flat Flat 
Diagram Two
Throwback(Flat)Read RouteFlat Deep Flat 
Diagram Three - A
ContainFlat CDHF/SContainES/SBFlat C1/31/31/3COVER 3
Frontside flat defender (S/S or D)
have varying basic re-sponsibilities depending on the offensive formation.
 Against the TE/Wing Formation
The flat defender reads through the TE/wing for his run/pass read. If wing pick-up motion occurs, then read TE toFB. If FB at you, assume waggle boot and drive for depth,eyeing the TE for deep outside route. Work to a point
un-der 
the route and over the top of the FB flat route. We in-corporate a “push” call between the deep outside 1/3 de-fender and the flat defender. When the third defender hasthe deep route covered he gives a “push” call to the flatdefender releasing him up to the FB route (diagram five).Communication is very important in defending any passscheme.
Diagram Three - B
ContainFlat CDHF/SContainES/SBC1/21/2Cover 5 Inside
Diagram Four - A
BH

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