Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Workforce Innovation Fund (WIF) Toolkit

Workforce Innovation Fund (WIF) Toolkit

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1,970|Likes:
Published by tjprograms

More info:

Published by: tjprograms on Jan 18, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/27/2012

pdf

text

original

 
January
 
2012
 
1
 
The
 
National
 
Transitional
 
Jobs
 
Network
 
has
 
developed
 
a
 
comprehensive
 
guide
 
for
 
potential
 
grantees
 
interested
 
in
 
applying
 
to
 
the
 
Workforce
 
Innovation
 
Fund
 
grant
 
solicitation.
 
This
 
tool
 
helps
 
grantees
 
consider
 
several
 
important
 
factors
 
before
 
applying
 
for
 
funds,
 
such
 
as
 
the
 
type
 
of 
 
program,
 
placements
 
and
 
participants
 
you
 
will
 
serve.
 
Potential
 
grantees
 
should
 
use
 
this
 
document
 
as
 
a
 
tool
 
when
 
considering
 
your
 
program
 
design
 
and
 
multisystems
 
support
 
partnerships
 
that
 
will
 
effectively
 
improve
 
outcomes
 
for
 
individuals
 
with
 
barriers
 
to
 
employment.
 
Defining
 
Population
 
&
 
Scale:
 
Deciding
 
your
 
participant
 
base
 
will
 
help
 
guide
 
your
 
decision
 
for
 
your
 
program
 
model,
 
funding,
 
partnerships,
 
and
 
additional
 
resources
 
you
 
should
 
consider.
 
 
What
 
is
 
the
 
primary
 
population
 
that
 
your
 
program
 
will
 
serve?
 
 
How
 
many
 
participants
 
will
 
your
 
program
 
serve?
 
 
Who
 
will
 
be
 
eligible
 
and
 
how
 
will
 
eligibility
 
be
 
determined?
 
 
How/Where
 
will
 
participants
 
be
 
recruited?
 
Creating
 
an
 
Administrative
 
Infrastructure
 
&
 
Building
 
Partnerships:
 
The
 
Workforce
 
Innovation
 
Funds
 
encourage
 
system
 
collaboration
 
and
 
partnership
 
to
 
support
 
transitions
 
into
 
employment
 
and
 
lavage
 
expertise
 
of 
 
multiple
 
systems.
 
Example
 
of 
 
potential
 
partnerships
 
to
 
consider
 
are
 
relationships
 
between
 
employers,
 
workforce
 
development,
 
education,
 
human
 
services,
 
social
 
insurance,
 
and
 
economic
 
development
 
programs.
 
 
What
 
other
 
state
 
and
 
local
 
agencies/vendors/WIBs
 
might
 
be
 
involved
 
in
 
service
 
delivery?
 
 
Who
 
will
 
be
 
the
 
employer
 
of 
 
record
 
for
 
subsidized
 
employment?
 
 
How
 
will
 
you
 
ensure
 
experience/skills
 
of 
 
vendor
 
staff 
 
match
 
program
 
goals
 
to
 
ensure
 
success?
 
 
What
 
staff 
 
will
 
be
 
standard
 
in
 
your
 
program
 
(case
 
managers,
 
resume
 
and
 
interview,
 
business
 
service
 
representatives,
 
etc.?)
 
 
Will
 
you
 
used
 
a
 
contract
 
with
 
vendors?
 
What
 
type
 
of 
 
contact
 
will
 
you
 
use?
 
(e.g.
 
performance
based,
 
cost
 
reimbursement)
 
 
Key
 
Questions
 
to
 
consider
 
in
 
applying
 
for
 
Workforce
 
Innovation
 
Funds
 
January
 
2012
 
January
 
2012
 
2
 
What
 
other
 
agreements
 
might
 
you
 
use
 
with
 
agencies
 
that
 
serve
 
participants?
 
(e.g.
 
MOU’s,
 
interagency
 
agreements)
 
 
What
 
formal
 
agreement
 
will
 
you
 
use
 
with
 
employers?
 
What
 
will
 
you
 
require
 
of 
 
them?
 
(e.g.
 
supervision,
 
training)
 
 
How
 
and
 
how
 
often
 
will
 
you
 
monitor
 
contracted
 
service
 
providers?
 
How
 
will
 
you
 
monitor
 
employers?
 
Ideas
 
for
 
TJ:
 
NTJN
 
would
 
encourage
 
applicants
 
to
 
consider
 
applying
 
or
 
partnering
 
to
 
apply
 
for
 
funds
 
that
 
support
 
Transitional
 
Jobs
 
program
 
enhancements
 
not
 
currently
 
being
 
evaluated
 
for
 
example:
 
 
Transitional
 
Jobs
 
approaches
 
blended
 
with
 
contextualized
 
adult
 
basic
 
education,
 
literacy,
 
bridge
 
programs
 
and/or
 
other
 
training
 
leading
 
to
 
employment.
 
 
Transitional
 
Jobs
 
approaches
 
blended
 
with
 
training
 
in
 
high
growth
 
sector
 
initiatives
 
leading
 
to
 
employment.
 
 
Longer
 
Transitional
 
Jobs
 
programs
 
or
 
stepped
 
approaches
 
that
 
gradually
 
increase
 
 job
 
responsibility,
 
stress
 
or
 
lead
 
to
 
on
the
 job
 
training
 
and/or
 
apprenticeships
 
 
Transitional
 
Jobs
 
program
 
approaches
 
blended
 
with
 
intensive
 
case
 
management
 
programs,
 
harm
 
reduction
 
approaches,
 
mentoring
 
and/or
 
peer
 
support
 
 
State
 
system
 
collaboration
 
efforts,
 
(Workforce
 
Development,
 
Child
 
Support,
 
TANF/SNAP,
 
Criminal
 
Justice,
 
Homelessness
 
and
 
Housing,
 
Foster
 
Care,
 
Veterans
 
Assistance
 
or
 
others)
 
in
 
which
 
Transitional
 
Jobs
 
is
 
the
 
primary
 
strategy
 
for
 
serving
 
the
 
employment
 
needs
 
of 
 
most
 
at
 
risk
 
or
 
vulnerable
 
populations.
 
Defining
 
Work
 
Placements:
 
The
 
subsidized
 
work
 
element
 
of 
 
the
 
Transitional
 
Jobs
 
program
 
strategy
 
can
 
be
 
structured
 
in
 
a
 
variety
 
of 
 
ways
 
to
 
provide
 
access
 
to
 
real
 
work,
 
skill
 
building
 
opportunities
 
and
 
supportive
 
services.
 
Regardless
 
of 
 
the
 
structure,
 
in
 
order
 
to
 
support
 
the
 
goals
 
of 
 
the
 
Transitional
 
Jobs
 
strategy
 
we
 
encourage
 
that
 
programs
 
consider
 
how
 
they
 
are
 
ensuring
 
that
 
the
 
real
 
work
 
experience
 
is
 
developmental.
 
NTJN
 
Ensuring
 
TJ
 
is
 
a
 
Developmental
 
Experience
 
Social
 
Enterprise
 
Commercial
 
businesses
 
used
 
to
 
provide
 
work
 
experience
 
and
 
 job
 
training
 
opportunities
 
for
 
disadvantaged
 
individuals.
 
These
 
businesses
 
use
 
revenue
 
generated
 
from
 
products
 
and/or
 
services
 
that
 
their
 
client
 
workforce
 
helps
 
produce
 
to
 
pay
 
for
 
wages
 
and
 
other
 
forms
 
of 
 
assistance.
 
Social
 
enterprises
 
range
 
from
 
manufacturing
 
plants
 
to
 
bakeries,
 
restaurants,
 
grounds
 
maintenance,
 
and
 
translation
 
services.
 
They
 
typically
 
fall
 
under
 
four
 
categories:
 
 
January
 
2012
 
3
1.
 
Traditional
 
sheltered
 
workshops
 
that
 
receive
 
preferential
 
treatment
 
for
 
government
 
funds
 
2.
 
Open
market
 
businesses
 
that
 
compete
 
with
 
the
 
private
sector
 
without
 
government
 
assistance
 
3.
 
Individual
 
franchises
 
within
 
a
 
national
 
corporation
 
4.
 
Enterprises
 
that
 
grow
 
out
 
of 
 
a
 
nonprofit
 
organization’s
 
social
 
service
 
programs
 
 Advantages:
 
 
Maximum
 
Control
Every
 
TJ
 
position
 
is
 
one
 
you
 
develop
 
and
 
manage
 
through
 
your
 
business.
 
 
Diversified
 
Work
 
Experience
 
 –
 
Participant
 
has
 
the
 
opportunity
 
to
 
work
 
in
 
a
 
number
 
of 
 
different
 
 jobs,
 
all
 
within
 
the
 
same
 
program.
 
 
Revenue
 
For
 
Wages
 
 –
 
Product
 
or
 
service
 
allows
 
for
 
non
restricted
 
program
 
funds
 
for
 
participant
 
wages.
 
 
Similar
 
Advantages
 
to
 
a
 
Work
Crew
 
Model
 
Challenges:
 
 
Capital
 
Needed
 
to
 
Start
 
 –
 
Social
 
Enterprises
 
are
 
expensive
 
to
 
start.
 
 
Staff 
 
Intensive
 
Creation
 
&
 
management
 
of 
 
business
 
while
 
employing
 
persons
 
with
 
barriers
 
to
 
employment.
 
 
Transitioning
 
BEST
 
workers
 
dilemma
The
 
goal
 
of 
 
TJ
 
is
 
the
 
transition.
 
When
 
people
 
are
 
ready
 
to
 
transition
 
 –
 
they
 
are
 
your
 
BEST
 
workers
 
so
 
you
 
must
 
balance
 
your
 
social
 
and
 
business
 
mission.
 
 
Market
 
Influence
 
 –
 
Your
 
program
 
depends
 
heavily
 
on
 
demand
 
for
 
your
 
product
 
or
 
service.
 
Individual
 
Placement
 
Program
 
staff 
 
members
 
work
 
with
 
individual
 
participants
 
to
 
place
 
them
 
in
 
a
 
Transitional
 
Job.
 
Types
 
of 
 
placement
 
sectors
 
may
 
include
 
clerical,
 
maintenance,
 
food
 
service,
 
and
 
childcare.
 
There
 
may
 
be
 
only
 
one
 
TJ
 
participant
 
working
 
at
 
a
 
work
 
site
 
or
 
there
 
may
 
be
 
a
 
few.
 
This
 
is
 
the
 
most
 
common
 
TJ
 
model.
 
 Advantages:
 
 
Maximum
 
Choice
 
 –
 
Matching
 
 job
 
site
 
and
 
participant
 
skills/interests.
 
 
Diversity
 
&
 
Number
 
of 
 
Employer
 
Relationships
 
 –
 
Community
 
buy
in
 
and
 
support
 
through
 
employer
 
engagement
 
and
 
relationship
 
building.
 
 
“Realest”
 
of 
 
Real
 
Work
 
Experience
Participants
 
work
 
with
 
people
 
NOT
 
in
 
an
 
employment
 
program;
 
therefore
 
receiving
 
immediate
 
feedback
 
from
 
colleagues
 
and
 
peers.
 
Challenges:
 
 
Staff 
 
Intensive
 
 –
 
Monitoring
 
individual
 
 job
 
sites
 
(subsidized
 
&
 
unsubsidized)
 
and
 
participants.
 
 
Diversity
 
&
 
Number
 
of 
 
Employer
 
Relationships
 
 –
 
A
 
lot
 
of 
 
relationships
 
to
 
manage.
 
Need
 
for
 
good
 
organization.
 
 
High
 
Need
 
for
 
Role
 
Clarity,
 
Communication
 
of 
 
Expectations
Program
 
staff 
 
must
 
set
 
clear
 
roles
 
and
 
expectations
 
of 
 
employer.
 
Having
 
an
 
employment
 
site
 
mentor
 
is
 
critical.
 
Work
 
Crews
 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->