Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Study Handbook - Prepared for my students

Study Handbook - Prepared for my students

Ratings:

4.0

(1)
|Views: 82 |Likes:
Published by ogangurel
It was the Enlightenment philosopher Kant who outlined the distinction between analytic and synthetic knowledge. By organizing information, analytic thought can facilitate human understanding but not necessarily add to it. On the other hand, synthetic knowledge adds to our understanding by creating new structures and connections among information. Why and how synthetic knowledge is possible is one of the greatest mysteries and miracles of life. When it comes to learning similar precepts also apply. There is both an analytic and synthetic approach to the assimilation of knowledge, with the latter overlapping the process of scholarly and artistic creation. Descartes* Discourse on Method written in 1637 presents perhaps the best explication of "analytic" learning. To guide the mind, he laid down four rules which sound strikingly contemporary.
* The first rule was never to accept anything as true unless I recognized it to be certainly and evidently such*
* The second was to divide each of the difficulties*into as many parts as possible, and as might be required for an easier solution*
* The third was to think in an orderly fashion when concerned with the search for truth, beginning with the things which were simplest and easiest to understand, and gradually and by degrees reaching toward more complex knowledge, even treating, as though ordered, materials which were not necessarily so*
* The last was both in the process of searching and reviewing, always to make enumerations so complete, and reviews so general, that I would be certain that nothing was omitted*
Descartes* method was strikingly successful as it * in large part * spawned the scientific revolution. This sort of analytic thinking contributed, for example, to Newton*s discovery of the Universal Law of Gravitation. However, to actually arrive at that insight, Newton had to make a synthetic leap of the imagination which wasn't an explicit part of Descartes* method.
In 1709 Giambattista Vico attacked analytic Cartesianism in his book On the Study Methods of Our Time. Feeling that synthetic and intuitive thought would be stunted by "analysis" he proposed his own educational program:
"I think young men should be taught the totality of sciences and arts, and their intellectual powers should be developed to the full. At the very outset, their common sense should be strengthened so that they can grow in prudence and eloquence. Let their imagination and memory be fortified so that they may be effective in those arts in which fantasy and mnemonic faculty are predominant."

Analysis is one of mankind's most powerful tools. But, in one sense, it merely lays the groundwork for the imaginative thought that leads to true progress. Thus, by infusing creativity in all your studying, you*ll be adding a personal stamp to knowledge by which it will be more solidly and permanently learned. But perhaps most important, you will be on that exciting edge of human progress, as Newton was when he analyzed and synthesized the meaning of a falling apple. Blaise Pascal said it best:
"We recognize truth not only through reason but also through the heart."

http://www.linkedin.com/in/ogangurel
It was the Enlightenment philosopher Kant who outlined the distinction between analytic and synthetic knowledge. By organizing information, analytic thought can facilitate human understanding but not necessarily add to it. On the other hand, synthetic knowledge adds to our understanding by creating new structures and connections among information. Why and how synthetic knowledge is possible is one of the greatest mysteries and miracles of life. When it comes to learning similar precepts also apply. There is both an analytic and synthetic approach to the assimilation of knowledge, with the latter overlapping the process of scholarly and artistic creation. Descartes* Discourse on Method written in 1637 presents perhaps the best explication of "analytic" learning. To guide the mind, he laid down four rules which sound strikingly contemporary.
* The first rule was never to accept anything as true unless I recognized it to be certainly and evidently such*
* The second was to divide each of the difficulties*into as many parts as possible, and as might be required for an easier solution*
* The third was to think in an orderly fashion when concerned with the search for truth, beginning with the things which were simplest and easiest to understand, and gradually and by degrees reaching toward more complex knowledge, even treating, as though ordered, materials which were not necessarily so*
* The last was both in the process of searching and reviewing, always to make enumerations so complete, and reviews so general, that I would be certain that nothing was omitted*
Descartes* method was strikingly successful as it * in large part * spawned the scientific revolution. This sort of analytic thinking contributed, for example, to Newton*s discovery of the Universal Law of Gravitation. However, to actually arrive at that insight, Newton had to make a synthetic leap of the imagination which wasn't an explicit part of Descartes* method.
In 1709 Giambattista Vico attacked analytic Cartesianism in his book On the Study Methods of Our Time. Feeling that synthetic and intuitive thought would be stunted by "analysis" he proposed his own educational program:
"I think young men should be taught the totality of sciences and arts, and their intellectual powers should be developed to the full. At the very outset, their common sense should be strengthened so that they can grow in prudence and eloquence. Let their imagination and memory be fortified so that they may be effective in those arts in which fantasy and mnemonic faculty are predominant."

Analysis is one of mankind's most powerful tools. But, in one sense, it merely lays the groundwork for the imaginative thought that leads to true progress. Thus, by infusing creativity in all your studying, you*ll be adding a personal stamp to knowledge by which it will be more solidly and permanently learned. But perhaps most important, you will be on that exciting edge of human progress, as Newton was when he analyzed and synthesized the meaning of a falling apple. Blaise Pascal said it best:
"We recognize truth not only through reason but also through the heart."

http://www.linkedin.com/in/ogangurel

More info:

Published by: ogangurel on Nov 11, 2008
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOC, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/01/2013

pdf

text

original

General Information

I hope that our work together will enhance your study plans. In
this small book, I've attempted to distill some general themes and
specific facts which you may find of further use in your studies.

Tutoring hours

I generally tutor all day on Sundays at the Columbia-Presbyterian
Medical Center. Before midterms and finals, I'll be available for
additional sessions weekday evenings between 7 and 10 pm up at
the Medical Center.

Tutoring locales
Bard Hall, Room 723This is the medical student dorm. To get

there take the 1, 9, or A trains up to 168th street. After exiting the
subway, walk west along 168th street alongside the hospital.
Cross Fort Washington where 168th street turns into Haven
Avenue and continue for one more block past the Psych. Institute
until you reach Bard Hall (the nearest cross street is 169th). Enter
at 60 Haven Avenue, show your CU ID and take the elevators to
the 7th floor.

Recovery Room CafeAlso in Bard Hall. See above.
P&S Student LoungeAlso up at the medical center. After

exiting the subway, walk half a block West and enter the hospital through the driveway. Show your CUID at the hospital reception desk and then take a right, continuing through two sets of double doors until you reach the student lounge on your right.

Columbia Center DeliFollow the same directions as Bard Hall

above but continue further along Haven Avenue until you reach
171st street. The Deli will be on your right. Table space and
coffee are provided in ample proportions.

What if I can't make it?

Please call in advance if you can't make a scheduled appointment. I'll try my best to schedule a make-up, but appointments that are missed without sufficient notice are subject to the usual fee.

Contacting me
Telephone
(212) 694-5690

I'd be happy to answer questions over the phone, but please don't
call after midnight. I'll try to return messages by the end of the
day.

FAX
(212) 694-5690
Study Handbook
\u00a9 Ogan Gurel
2

Sometimes it's easier to send information such as your schedule,
or a last-minute written problem by FAX. Kinko's Copies has a
public FAX service at $2 a page.

Study Handbook
\u00a9 Ogan Gurel
3
Thoughts on Learning

It was the Enlightenment philosopher Kant who outlined the
distinction between analytic and synthetic knowledge. By
organizing information, analytic thought can facilitate human
understanding but not necessarily add to it. On the other hand,
synthetic knowledge adds to our understanding by creating new
structures and connections among information. Why and how
synthetic knowledge is possible is one of the greatest mysteries
and miracles of life.

When it comes to learning similar precepts also apply. There is
both an analytic and synthetic approach to the assimilation of
knowledge, with the latter overlapping the process of scholarly
and artistic creation. Descartes\u2032Discourse on Method written in
1637 presents perhaps the best explication of "analytic" learning.
To guide the mind, he laid down four rules which sound strikingly
contemporary.

\u2022The first rule was never to accept anything as true
unless I recognized it to be certainly and evidently
such\u2026
\u2022The second was to divide each of the
difficulties\u2026into as many parts as possible, and as
might be required for an easier solution\u2026
\u2022The third was to think in an orderly fashion when

concerned with the search for truth, beginning with
the things which were simplest and easiest to
understand, and gradually and by degrees reaching
toward more complex knowledge, even treating, as
though ordered, materials which were not necessarily
so\u2026

\u2022The last was both in the process of searching and

reviewing, always to make enumerations so
complete, and reviews so general, that I would be
certain that nothing was omitted\u2026

Study Handbook
\u00a9 Ogan Gurel
4

Activity (3)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
therendering liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->