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The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers

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The Federalist Papers consist of 85 essays outlining how this new government would operate and why this type of government was the best choice for the United States of America. All of the essays were signed "PUBLIUS" and the actual authors of some are under dispute, but the general consensus is that Alexander Hamilton wrote 52, James Madison wrote 28, and John Jay contributed the remaining five.
The Federalist Papers consist of 85 essays outlining how this new government would operate and why this type of government was the best choice for the United States of America. All of the essays were signed "PUBLIUS" and the actual authors of some are under dispute, but the general consensus is that Alexander Hamilton wrote 52, James Madison wrote 28, and John Jay contributed the remaining five.

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PGCC Collection: The Federalist PapersFrom: http://www.constitution.org/liberlib.htmOur Thanks to The Consitution Society for Providing This eBook!!World eBook Library PGCC CollectionBringing the world's eBook Collection Togetherhttp://www.WorldLibrary.netProject Gutenberg Consortia Center is a member of theWorld eBook Library Consortia, http://WorldLibrary.net __________________________________________________ LimitationsBy accessing this file you agree to all the Terms andConditions, as stated here.This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no costand with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copyit, give it away or re-use it under the terms of theProject Gutenberg License included with this eBook oronline at www.gutenberg.netHere are 3 of the more major items to consider:1. The eBooks on the PG sites are NOT 100% public domain,some of them are copyrighted and used by permissionand thus you may charge for redistribution only viadirect permission from the copyright holders.2. Project Gutenberg is a registered trademark [TM].For any other purpose than to redistribute eBookscontaining the entire Project Gutenberg file freeof charge and with the headers intact, permissionis required.3. The public domain status is per U.S. copyright law.This eBook is from the Project Gutenberg ConsortiumCenter of the United States.The mission of the Project Gutenberg Consortia Center
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is to provide a similar framework for the collectionof eBook collections as does Project Gutenberg forsingle eBooks, operating under the practices, andgeneral guidelines of Project Gutenberg.The major additional function of Project GutenbergConsortia Center is to manage the addition of largecollections of eBooks from other eBook creation andcollection centers around the world.The complete license details are online at:http://gutenberg.net/license__________________________________________________ The Federalist Papersby Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James MadisonJuly, 1998 [eBook #1404]PGCC Collection: The Federalist Papers*eBook File: feder10a.pdf or feder10a.htm**Corrected EDITIONS, feder11a.pdfSeparate source VERSION, feder10b.pdfFrom: http://www.constitution.org/liberlib.htmOur Thanks to The Consitution Society for Providing This eBook!!
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Ver.04.29.93*From: http://www.constitution.org/liberlib.htmOur Thanks to The Consitution Society for Providing This eBook!!FEDERALIST No. 1General IntroductionFor the Independent Journal.Saturday, October 27, 1787HAMILTONTo the People of the State of New York:AFTER an unequivocal experience of the inefficacy of the subsistingfederal government, you are called upon to deliberate on a newConstitution for the United States of America. The subject speaks itsown importance; comprehending in its consequences nothing less than theexistence of the UNION, the safety and welfare of the parts of which itis composed, the fate of an empire in many respects the most interestingin the world. It has been frequently remarked that it seems to have beenreserved to the people of this country, by their conduct and example, todecide the important question, whether societies of men are reallycapable or not of establishing good government from reflection andchoice, or whether they are forever destined to depend for theirpolitical constitutions on accident and force. If there be any truth inthe remark, the crisis at which we are arrived may with propriety beregarded as the era in which that decision is to be made; and a wrongelection of the part we shall act may, in this view, deserve to beconsidered as the general misfortune of mankind.This idea will add the inducements of philanthropy to those ofpatriotism, to heighten the solicitude which all considerate and goodmen must feel for the event. Happy will it be if our choice should bedirected by a judicious estimate of our true interests, unperplexed andunbiased by considerations not connected with the public good. But thisis a thing more ardently to be wished than seriously to be expected. Theplan offered to our deliberations affects too many particular interests,innovates upon too many local institutions, not to involve in itsdiscussion a variety of objects foreign to its merits, and of views,
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