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richrodriguezspreadpt1

richrodriguezspreadpt1

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m
The
Spread
Offense:
Four Receivers
Pt.l
By Rich Rodriguez,
Head Coach, West Virginia UniversityExcerpted from "Football Offenses & Plays" with permission fromHuman Kinetics.
hen people iliinkabout lliL- .spieadoffense, theythink of a iio-hud-dlf, iast-teinpo, high-linessi' style
ol
play. While the spread is
a
fasl-tenipo,no-hiiddle ofiense. we don'l reallyview
it
as liigli finesse. We see
the
spread as an offense that contintiousiyapplies pressure
to
the defense, whileiillowing us
to
play with
a
distinctlyphysical style.Every coach attempts
to
create
an
advantage
for
his fodiball team. Thespread offense gives us
a
number ofadvantages.
Il
forces
a
defen.se
to
align quickly and reduces defensivesuhstitutions. which can directly dic-tate ihe tempo
of
the game. Becauseoi tlie lack of defensive substitutions,conditioning becomes
a
major factor.Other major advantages associatedwith the spread are that
it
forces
a
defense
to
cover the entire footballfield, tbus creating space
in
which ourathletes can work. .-VJong with creatingspace, the spread also helps create
U
ar pictures for the quarterback,:iaking
it a
quarterback-friendly)1 Tense.The ba-sic elements
of
running
an
ffective shotgiin spread offense arelisted here:1.Make the defense defend
the
entire field.
2.
Play with multiple tempos.
3.
Make the quarterback
a
dualthreat—rim and pass.
4.
Make the execution
of
the offensesimple but not predictable.
5-
Execute base plays. Practice repeti-tions. Get good
at
something.The base formations used
in the
tour-receiver shotgun spreati oiTenseaie doubles (2-3-2 set. figure
8.1a)
and trips {3-3-1 set, figure 8.1b),Wiien using tbese two formations, rec-ogtii/ing and reading safety align-ments becomes very imporiant.
16 UGUST 2007COACH AND ATHLETIC
 
FOOTBALL The Spread Offense: Four Receivers
Figure
8.1
Four-receiver shotgun spread base formations.c
c
LB
LB LB SS
V
V V V
®
o o
©
o o
®
oo
®
LB
LB
V
V V V
o
o e o o
o
o
a
doubles
b
tripsFigure 8.2 Double-hi.
LB
LB
V
V V V
o
o e o o
o
o
a
2-X-2 set
vs.
double safety
V
V V V
o
o e o o
o
o
b
3-X-1 set
vs.
double safety
The first safety alignment is whatwe call single-hi, meaning ihai there'sone safety
in the
middle
of
the field(figures
8.1a and
8.1b). With
a
single-hi look,
no
more than six defenderscan
be in the
box unless
a
receiver
is
uncovered.The next safety alignment
is the
double-hi, meaning there
are
twosafeties high (figure 8.2). With double-hi safeties,
no
more than five defend-ers can
be in the box
unless receiversare uncovered.Based
off
these two safety align-menLs, double-hi
or
single-hi,
the
scheme allows
the
offense
to
choosewhich plays
to
run, creating numbersor angle advantages
for
the offense
to
run
or
pass.Before installing base offensiveplays, understand
and
teach
the
basicformations
and
fundamentals associat-ed with
the
procedure
of
running
an
effective no-huddle, spread offensiveattack. As
in
any offensive attack,
the
execution
of
base
plays still dependson having
an
effective system that canbe easily communicated
to
players,allowing them
to
concentrate
on the
fundamentals associated with
the run-
ning
and
passing schemes
and not the
procedure
itself.
In
our
running-game system, weconcentrate
on
three schemes: zoneschemes (zone),
man
schemes (draw),and pull schemes (trap
and
dart).
In
our passing game, we throw five baseconcepts, based
on
areas
on tbe
field:quick game, intermediate, deep,sprint,
and
run-action passes (nakeds).As
the
spread offense has evolvedand become more popular, defenseshave devised different schemes
to
defend
the
spread. Defenses
try to
give mtiltiple looks by stemming
and
disguising, looking
to
confuse
the
quarterback
and
play caller. Stemmingdefensive line techniques
(for
exam-
ple,
three lechniqties become
one
technique
and
vice versa) is often
an
attempt
to
slow
the
tempo
of
theoffense
and
clutter
the
picture. Otherdefensive line movemenis includeangling
and
slanting
the
line once
tbe
ball
is
snapped.Disguising occurs through showinga double-hi safety look
and
rotating
to
a single-hi safety look, seeking
to
gainan extra defender
in the box for rtm
support.
A
defense
can
also attempt
to
disrupt
the
picture by using
the
alleydefenders as gray-area defenders
(out-
side linebackers
or
strong safedes),again looking
to
gain
an
advantage
in
the running game
and
quick passingor perimeter throws. To counter this,the offense must have
a
thoroughpackage
to
attack
the
sienuniug
and
disguising defenses, such as quickscreens, quarterback rtms,
and run-
action passes consisting
of
drop-backsand nakeds.
RUNNING GAME
Because
of
tbe various
ways
thatdefenses
are
now defending
the
spread,
the
first
run
scheme tiiat weinstall
in
our running attack
is the
zone scheme.
ZONE
The zone scheme (figure
8.3)
helpsus against teams that
are
slanting
or
' stemming
and
disguising.
Figure 8.3 Zone.
LB
LB LB
a
doubles zone
b
trips zone18 UGUST2007COACH AND ATHLETIC DIRECTOR
 
FOOTBAI.I. The Spread Offense: Four Receivers
The zone forces
a
defense lo play dis-ciplined. Including the quarterback asa run threat allows us to even
the
numbers versus a six-man box byallowing the quarterback to read
the
extra number.To be an effective /.one team, everyofTensive position must be on the samepage, and all must be accountable
for
their roles. The five offensive linemenmust handle the five most immediateihreaLs in tbe box. The running backmust make correct reads, tbus makingthe offensive line correct. The runningback must demonstrate great patienceto the hole, but not
through
the hole.The running back is responsible
for
placing the linemen
on
their blocks.For the running back to be able to do
tbis.
the back's course musi be consis-tent witb each back carrying the foot-ball. The quarterback must be disci-plined and correct in reading theextra defender. Tbe receivers must beable to block the gray-area defendersby using proper landmarks and takingibe coriect paths to their blockinga.ssignments.All covered offensive linemen mtisttake a directional zone step at thedefensive linemati's outside-arm breastplate. Uncovered ofTensive linemenmust take the proper landmark
to
block second-level defenders. All line-men must stay on their tracks (not
a
man scbeine). The guard to the bub-ble side (1 technique or 5 technique)must he alert
for
the
1
technique noseto chip him before taking bis hack
to
the second-level defender (figure 8.4).The running back's steps in
the
Figure
8.4
Guard waits
for
noseto chip-block him before taking
his
track to the second-level defender.
LBV
^--7
V
LBV
V
zone scheme consist of an open stepand
a
crossover before meshing witbtbe quarterback. After the
handoff,
tbe running back takes two steps pastthe quarterback, rolling downhill, aim-ing at the butt of the offensive tackle.The running back reads the first downdefensive lineman to second downdefensive lineman. The back has threeoptions after his read
of
the downdefensive linemen: bang. bend,
or
bounce.The quarterback secures the snapand stays flat-footed
for
the mesh,making sure
to
keep his eyes on
his
read defender. He executes tbe hand-off or keep, based on his reads.The inside receivers take the prop-er path to block the alley defenders.Tbey mtist work to
a
position
in
whichthey can dig the defenders out and getthem displaced vertically up the field.The outside receivers block base,blocking the man over.This is our base running play; wecan run many plays
off
the zone con-cept, inciuding nakcds, play-actionpasses, screens, and reverses.
DRAW
The first man scheme
in
oui-
1
uiigame is the draw play (figure 8.5).This scheme allows us to attack thedefense downhill, while the defense
is
displaced covering the formations.The draw play is used to slow down
a
defensive team's pass rush, to takeadvantage of alley defenders expand-ing in tbe passing game, and to con-tinue to keep the defense off balancebelwcen run and pass. The draw playhas been very effective
in
passing situ-ations, whether the running back orthe quarterback carries the hall.The offensive linetiien must showpass, allowing the defensive linemento get up tbe field
to
rush ihe passer.The linemen must transition frombeing pass setters to run blockers. Thecenter and gtuird to ibe nose sidemust be ready to set together andcombo the backside linebacker.The rtmning hack takes
a
naturalpa.ss set action while sliding in
for
themesh with the quarterback to receivethe ball. Tbe running back's aiming
Figure 8.5 Draw.ss
a
draw QB
(FS)
(SS)
b
draw RB
Figure 8.6
Trap.
ss
®
a trap read
LB
LB
b
trap QB
20 AUGUST
2007
COACH AND ATHLETIC DIRECTOR

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