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Woodhouse Debate Memo 1-19-2012

Woodhouse Debate Memo 1-19-2012

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Published by Zeke Miller

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Published by: Zeke Miller on Jan 19, 2012
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05/25/2012

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From: Brad Woodhouse, Democratic National CommitteeTo: Interested PartiesDate: January 19, 2012RE:
Questions Mitt Romney Needs to Answer at Tonight’s Debate
 Tonight, as the Republican presidential candidates meet in South Carolina for their final debate
 before the state’s Saturday primary, voters still have a number of unanswered questions about
Mitt Romney and his campaign.
That’s because throughout the course of Romney’s presidential
bid, he has continued to run a campaign based on secrecy and a fundamental lack of transparencywith the American people, who deserve to know the truth about Mitt Romney before they headto the polls.From refusing to release his tax returns despite overwhelming precedent for presidentialcandidates doing so, to repeatedly shifting his position on Super PACs, Mitt Romney has beendodging the issues left and right. Will he finally come clean tonight?
WHY WON’T MITT ROMNEY FOLLO
W PRECEDENT AND RELEASE HIS TAXRECORDS FOR AT LEAST THE LAST SIX YEARS?In an editorial published on Tuesday, the
New York Times
called on Mitt Romney to release hisincome tax returns
 – 
a standard practice for presidential candidates that Romney has refused tofollow
 – 
 
emphasizing that Romney’s “insistence on secrecy” regarding his tax returns is“impossible to defend.”
Mitt Romney has been carelessly rejecting a precedent set by everyRepublican and Democratic presidential nominee for a generation. His own father released histax returns going back 12 years when he ran for president in 1968.
Romney’s reluctance to
playing by the same set of rules as everyone else also stands in direct contrast to PresidentObama, who during his 2008 presidential campaign released his tax returns going back to 2000.With mounting pressure from his own party to come clean with the American people
 – 
even NewJersey Governor Chris C
hristie, Romney’s staunchest ally on the campaign trail, 
that Romney should release his tax returns “sooner rather than later” – 
Mitt Romney began topivot during the GOP presidential debate on Monday night. He told voters that night that he
would “probably” agree to release his returns in April, but he refused to commit to any specificsand will not say whether he’ll release
returns for more than just one year.What is Mitt Romney so worried about? For starters, he has likely been trying to avoid havingvoters find out what he reluctantly admitted on Tuesday
 – 
 
that that he has paid “closer to the 15 percent” tax rate, a lower rate than what most middle
-class families pay. The truth is thatRomney made his millions from investments at Bain Capital, which are taxed at a far lower ratethan the wages of working and middle-class Americans.
There’s a clear reason why Romney
opposes the Buffett rule, which says millionaires should not pay a lower tax rate than theirsecretaries as a result of tax loopholes: he benefits from them.
There’s also the issue of MittRomney’s
investments in offshore funds, raised today by ABC News
:“Romney has as much as

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