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More of the "Titanic", Filson Young

More of the "Titanic", Filson Young

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Published by Titanicware
584

THE BOOKMAN F'

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. MARY A N T I N I N EDWARD EVERETT H A L E ' S LIBRARY

this Statement, but I can only go on repeating it, since it is the truth. I had no plan when I began. One day I found myself thinking of the time I went to school in Polotzk, and
584

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. MARY A N T I N I N EDWARD EVERETT H A L E ' S LIBRARY

this Statement, but I can only go on repeating it, since it is the truth. I had no plan when I began. One day I found myself thinking of the time I went to school in Polotzk, and

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Published by: Titanicware on Jan 23, 2012
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02/11/2012

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584THE BOOKMAN
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MARY ANTIN
IN
EDWARD EVERETT
HALE'S
LIBRARY
this Statement,
but
I
can
only
go on re
peating
it,
since
it is the
truth.
I
had no
plan when
I
began.
One day
I
foundmyself thinking
of
the
time
I
went
to
school
in
Polotzk, and
I
wrote about that.Another
day
I
kept seeing
the
little girlsI used
to
play with,
and
I
put
them
in.
Then
it was the
market-place thathaunted me,
or the
Dvina gurgled
in my
ears
all
night,
or
there came into
my
mind
a
tale
the
women used
to
tell whilepicking feathers
of
a
winter evening.
I
put these things down just
as
they came,and
so
grew
the
book. When
it
came
to
putting these fragments together,
I
foundthat they fitted wonderfully well, considering their haphazard origin.
A
little
re
arrangement
of
the loose sheets,
an
introductory sentence here,
a
connectingphrase there,
and the
story fell intochapters that named themselves.
I
neverknew what
I
was
going
to do
till
it
was
done.
The
only part
of
the
book thatwas done consciously, with the sense thatsuch
and
such matters ought
to be in
cluded, were
the
first four chapters.These were written last
of
all,
when
I
had exhausted
my
unprompted reminiscences.
It
is the
only part
of
the
bookthat
I
worked over.
The
rest, especiallythe American chapters,
I
dipped
up
fromthe bottom
of
my
inkwell."There seems
to be no
abatement
in the
production
of
books about
the
ill-fated
Titanic
and the
lessons
More
of
the
that
are
to be
learned
"Titanic"
from
the
disaster
of
lastApril. Last month
we
referred
to
the
book
by Mr.
LawrenceBeeseley. Another work
on
the
samesubject
has
just come from
the pen of
Mr. Filson Young,
the
exceedingly talented author
of
The
Sands
of
Pleasure.
Again there
is
An
Unsinkable Titanic,
which
is the
work
of J.
Bernard Walker.This last named book
has an
interest
in
the fact that
the
author
is the
editor
of
the
Scientific American.
Mr.
Walkerwas
a
civil engineer
by
profession,
and
entered
the
field
of
journalism
as the re-
 
CHRONICLE AND COMMENT585
J. BERNARD WALKER
suit of frequent contributions to technicalmagazines written in leisure hours. Hehas been the editor of the
ScientificAmerican
for the past seventeen years,during which most of the more impor-tant engineering articles appearing in thepublication have been written by him.He has made a special study of navalaitairs, and is a firm believer in the con-trolling influence of sea power in shapingnational destinies. His writings on thenavy and the merchant marine date from"a special edition of the
Scientific Ameri-can
on the Navy brought out during theSpanish American War." Nearly halfa million copies of that edition were sold.The present book on the
Titanic
is dueto the widespread interest aroused by hisarticles explaining the causes which ledto the loss of the ship. Many personswe think will be surprised to learn fromMr. Walker's book that the
Great Eas-
tern,
possibly the most lamentable fail-ure in the history of ship construction,was nevertheless the safest big ship everbuilt.
 
586THE BOOKMAN
"la*"
^
"*/''4»/tJiai
MARY AUSTIN"
"I shall never write another book dealing with the West—that is, with theprimitive life of theMary West," said Mary Aus-Austin tin the other day whendiscussing her new workwith a friend. "I feel that the West wasgenerous to me in material, and I do notmean to say that the primitive life of thedesert has ceased to interest me, butmerely that I have written as muchabout it as I care to. Others will findmaterial in the far West no doubt, foralthough the rough life of the miningcamps and the cattle ranches is alreadytinged with civilisation in almost everylocality there still remains enough thatis picturesque to furnish a library fullof books." Mrs. Austin went on to explain that she feels that she has foundher field in the more complicated life ofthe cities. Following her book of essays,
Christ in Italy,
is
A Woman of Genius
described as a novel of temperamentrather than one of locality, which is tobe issued this month. In the words ofthe author,
A Woman of Genius
is "thestory of the struggle between a geniusfor tragic acting and the daughter of aCounty Clerk, with the social ideal ofTaylorville, Ohianna, for the villain."
Daz'idee Birot
is the sixth novel byRene Bazin to be pubhshed in this country. M. Bazin has beenRene in the United States asBazin one of the French Commission to the Cham-plain Tercentenary. He is one of thevery few French writers whose worksare brought out in this country at thesame time that they appear in France.
Davidee Birot
is described as a lovestory of a young French girl who becomes a school-teacher in a little town inArdesie through an intense desire to beof service. This book deals with the social problems introduced by the prominence of labour unions. Its plot largelydepends upon a strike of miners whothrong the town in Ardesie, whereDavidee's school is. M. Bazin was bornin Angers in 1853. He was a delicateboy and spent most of his early years onan Angevin farm. As he grew up hestudied and practised law at Angers andfor many years held a professorship ofcriminal law in the university there. Hisnatural inclinations were literary and hewas driven toward novel writing by hisintense feeling that the run of Frenchnovels misrepresented the French peo
ple,
partly through their concentration onthe life of Paris. He set himself to reveal the nature of the people, of theFrench provinces,—a section of Frenchlife which he felt had been strangelyneglected. He aimed to show France andthe world that his people had depth andsimplicity of nature, and were at root anintensely moral people. Partly becauseof this some of his earlier novels turnedmainly on religious questions,—and sincehe was a Catholic, a large section of hisAmerican public has been CathoHc. Hehas set forth his literary creed in thesewords: "Our novelists, by occupyingthemselves with this unrepresentativepart too exclusively, have created andspread a conception of our country which

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