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Five Short Stories by Randy Gonzalez

Five Short Stories by Randy Gonzalez

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Published by Dr. Randy Gonzalez
A collection of five short stories by Randy Gonzalez; Included in this collection of spy and police drama are:

An Explosive Personality (Police Drama)

Knight Checks Queen (Spy Thriller)

Flotsam and Jetsam (Spy-Police Drama)

Knight in Shining Armor (Spy Thriller)

The Hunter Haunts the Habitat (Private Detective Drama)
A collection of five short stories by Randy Gonzalez; Included in this collection of spy and police drama are:

An Explosive Personality (Police Drama)

Knight Checks Queen (Spy Thriller)

Flotsam and Jetsam (Spy-Police Drama)

Knight in Shining Armor (Spy Thriller)

The Hunter Haunts the Habitat (Private Detective Drama)

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Published by: Dr. Randy Gonzalez on Jan 23, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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A Collection of Short Stories by Randy Gonzalez 
www.drgonzo.org 1
 Five Short Stories by Randy Gonzalez
Included in this Collection are: 
An Explosive Personality (Police Drama)Knight Checks Queen (Spy Thriller)Flotsam and Jetsam (Spy-Police Drama)Knight in Shining Armor (Spy Thriller)The Hunter Haunts the Habitat (Private Detective Drama)
gonzoscti@hotmail.com Randy Gonzalez's Website 
 
A Collection of Short Stories by Randy Gonzalez 
www.drgonzo.org 2
An Explosive Personality“I know ya’ll are familiar with salt peter,” Bomb Disposal Sergeant Floral Sage said. “I’m sure youguys in the class are.” She had a tantalizing Texas accent. Dark eyes flashed mischievousness. “You mixthe salt peter, or potassium nitrate. With sulfur and charcoal. The combination of the three gives us acrude form of gunpowder.” Sergeant Sage pointed to a diagram. At the Metro-County Police Academy, herlecture was on homemade bomb devices. She was an expert. “Do enough fine tuning, and you end up withan explosive. Using an appropriate pestle and mortar. Like with most things, too much friction causes andexplosive personality to this stuff.” She glanced around the room. The recruits were quiet. They alwayswere, she thought. “No one has a question?” Her lean muscular features, tough presence and strongpersonality were intimidating. “Maybe we should go do the obstacle course?” Just then, her attentionriveted on the academy director. Her concentration was broken. Speaking of friction she thought.Fireworks leaped inside.“Attention on deck!The recruit class leader screamed. As she stood to attention, the rest of the classfollowed. They sounded off with their class motto, something along lines of serving and protecting.“At ease,” the director said. Stern look, calm and confident. Recruits saw him as a hero. He threw anappreciative glance to Sergeant Flo. His heart jumped. The eye contact lasted longer than a professionalgreeting. A woman in uniform, he thought. This one in particular. The little voice in his mind screamed,wow, she’s one good looking woman! Short dark red hair, cut close. Well-proportioned, big brown eyestanned and toned. She could be a recruitment poster for police work. He remembered the time she injuredhim in a judo match. She was embarrassed, he was impressed. “As you were, ladies and gentleman.”“Good morning, Director,” Sergeant Flo greeted. A controlled smile held back what she really felt. Aslight shoulder shift in his direction. The little voice in her mind yelled, whew, he can light my fuseanytime! Too bad we couldn’t stay married to each other, she thought. Her choice, not his. Yet, she stillfound Director Ridge Rockwell III very appealing. Good feelings stirred inside her.“Morning, Sarge,” the director smiled. “Good to see you. Please excuse the interruption.” He wasactually looking for an excuse to enter her classroom. He approached the podium with a smoothcomfortable presence. Turning to the class, he said with an impressive voice, “Good morning class. Myapologies to the Sergeant for the interruption. I wish to review a few updates, pertaining to the trainingcurriculum and state rule changes and the upcoming certification exam.” He finished quickly and turned toSergeant Sage. A wink and a nod, a faint smirk. His trademark. As he passed by her, he whispered, “MayI see you in my office during the break?”“Yes, sir,” she answered in a crisp manner, standing at attention. Holding back a smile which tried toforce itself across her full lips. She was taller than he. But, that didn’t matter to him. She knew he likedtall women. “Would be my pleasure,” she whispered with a breathy tone.“Mine too,” he whispered back. There was something about women cops, he thought. His mature goodlooks, sophisticated manner and well-groomed appearance were very attractive qualities. The kind of things that set him apart from other men. They were good together once. Just couldn’t live together.
 
A Collection of Short Stories by Randy Gonzalez 
www.drgonzo.org 3
Sergeant Sage knew the Director’s legendary reputation. He held the rank of Commander within theagency. That meant gold eagles on the collar, just below deputy chief. Injured in the line of duty, heaccepted appointment to the police academy. He had transformed the training center into a premieroperation. Commendations had followed him where ever he went.“Love the uniform,” he said, when he saw her approach. In the heat of passion, they married tooquickly. Then divorced. But, for weeks now, they had started seeing each other again.“Permission to enter, sir?” Sergeant Sage asked from his doorway. A grin spanned her face. “You’relooking good, Ridge. Of course in a mature kind of way. Aging nicely. Still attracting a following of young female recruits?”“Please, Flo.” He stood up from behind his desk. He felt her scan him up and down. Perfectly tailorednavy pinstripe pants. Starched white shirt, with gold cuff links. Silver tie. He dressed well. “Give me abreak. You know that wasn’t our problem. They’re too young. Your freedom was the issue.”“I was always suspicious, though.” Her eyes flirted with him. “And, I know what the issue was, stillis.” She glanced around his office, still very fond of him. Down deep, she liked him very much.“Trying to impress the recruits?” He asked with a teasing tone. “All this formality. My gosh, we’ve gotuniforms older than some of them.” He came around the side of the large oak desk. The black leather chairswiveled and rocketed at his maneuver. He met her in the center of the room. They hugged, held andstared a few seconds. They sat on an overstuffed brown leather couch.She noted the office was done with an oriental flare. None of his diplomas hung the wall. Just Japaneseprints, depicting samurai warriors in action. His penchant for the Orient. He’d even studied at the TokyoPolice Academy, a rough and regimented place. He had injuries to prove it.“Comfy couch, Ridge,” she said, almost suggesting something. That smirk of hers pulled him in. “Doesit fold out into a bed?” A flare of daring showed in her eyes, flashing alluring flirtation.“Why Flo, is that an offer?” He smiled with a raised eyebrow. “We’ve certainly done that before.” Heraccent got him again. Not just a southern woman, like a southern belle. With that genteel seductiveenticing manner. But, a Texan. She’d ride, rope and brand you. And, you’d like it. He did.“Maybe later, but not here.” Her stare said she was still very interested in him. She knew the feelingwas reciprocal. “Call me. I’ve missed you the past few weeks. You have the number in your cell phone.”“Always do.” He longed to be with her on a permanent basis again. She was never one to be tied down.He swallowed, cleared his throat, and started, “Okay, changing the subject. Got some things to run by you.You’re the expert. By the way, coffee? Cigar?” She nodded with enthusiasm. He knew she always likedthe way he made coffee. Plus, the woman liked his imported hand made cigars. Very expensive.“You still making that espresso stuff you call coffee?” She asked with a twang. “If so, I’ll have a cup.”“I always loved your coffee making skills, among other things, Ridge.” She spotted the mahogany humidoron his huge desk. “What was that Freud said about cigars?” Her jesting was intriguing. “Never mind, I’lltake one for later.” Oh well, she mused. Sometimes, a cigar is just a cigar, nothing else. By the expressionon his face, she knew a special assignment was just around the corner. That, she liked.

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