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Syllabus v9 - fall 2002 - Cell & Molecular Biology

Syllabus v9 - fall 2002 - Cell & Molecular Biology

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Published by: ogangurel on Nov 13, 2008
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Biology 301
Cellular and Molecular Biology
Fall 2002

This course covers the biological principles relating to cellular and subcellular levels of structure and function. Topics include introductory biochemistry and molecular biology as well as the fundamentals of cell structure and physiology. Implications of these basic principles for medical science will be considered as appropriate.

Lecturer:
Dr. Ogan Gurel
Office Hours: After class
Email:
ogurel@roosevelt.edu
Lectures:
Tuesdays & Thursdays
6:00 - 7:15 PM
Discussion: Tuesdays
7:20 - 8:20 PM
Laboratory: Thursdays
7:30 - 9:50 PM
Prerequisites: Biology 150, Chemistry 202 and Chemistry 211
Texts
Required:
Text: Campbell, Reece and Mitchell, (2002), Biology 6th ed.
Benjamin/Cummings
Lab: Winfrey, Rott and Wortmann, (1997), Unraveling DNA,
molecular biology for the laboratory. Prentice Hall.
Suggested:
Martha A. Taylor, (2002), Student study guide for Cambell's Biology
6th edition.Benja min/Cu mmings.
Objectives:
This is a survey course in cellular structure and function. Upon completion you should be
able to:

1.Understand the fundamentals of molecular bonding and the special role of water
2.Describe the structure of carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids and proteins
3.Describe how enzymes function
4.Identify the components of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and their respective

functions

5.Describe how prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells regulate gene expression
6.Understand basic cell membrane structure and function
7.Describe the phases and events in the cell cycle
8.Understand basic cell metabolism \u2013 in particular, the biochemical pathways

involved in the production of energy
9.Conduct basic experiments and write a intepretative report of the results
COURSE PROCEDURES & POLICIES
Course Grades: Grades will be based on
1. Three 100 point exams
2. Laboratory exercises (150 points total)
Exams consist of a mix of multiple choice, matching, true/false, short
answer, and problems
Grading Scale: Based on a class specific curve
Attendance policy: While attendance for lectures is not required, it is highly suggested.

Borderline grades will be decided based on attendance, individual effort and class participation. Attendance for the discussion section is highly recommended since we will be actively discussing problems and articles.Attendance for laboratory, on the other

hand, is mandatory.It is difficult, if not impossible, to understand how and why a

technique works if you do not actually perform the experiment in the lab. In addition, many of the lab session build upon experiments conducted in the previous session. As such, it will be impossible to continue the remaining experiments.

In the case that you must miss a lab due to personal or family illness, funerals, or religious or work- related commitments, the instructor should be notified prior to the lab so that alternate arrangements can be made. If you miss more than two laboratories, you must repeat the entire laboratory section.

Missed Exams: Only doctor's orders, family illness or death in the family and acts of God

are considered excusable reasons for missing an exam. Proper documentation is required. The instructor should be notified as soon as possible if you are unable to take an exam. Make up exams will be oral.

Dishonesty: Dishonesty of any kind including cheating or plagiarism will not be tolerated.

All matters of dishonesty will result in failure for the course. Plagiarism includes submitting another student's work as your own, presenting information from others' work as your own, and presenting information, even from the text or the laboratory manual, without recognition of the source.

Work done in collaboration with others and attributed appropriately is permissible but
must be discussed with the instructor beforehand.
LECTURE SCHEDULE(revised)
DATE
LECTURE TOPICS
TEXT CHAPTER
ASSIGNMENTS
9/5
Introduction / Molecular Bonding
2,4
9/10
Water & pH
3
9/12
Carbohydrates & Lipids
5
9/17
Proteins (no lecture on 9/19 \u2013 lab only)
5
9/24
Enzymes
6
9/26
Nucleic Acids
5
10/1
DNA Replication
16
10/3
Gene Expression I
17
10/8
Gene Expression II
17
10/10
Prokaryotic Gene Expression I
18
10/15
Prokaryotic Gene Expression II
18
10/17
EXAM I (covers lectures 9/5 through 10/8)
10/22
Eukaryotic Gene Expression I
19
10/24
Eukaryotic Gene Expression II
19
10/29
Biology of Cancer
19
10/31
Plasma Membrane Structure, Transport Channel, Cell
Signaling & Signal Transduction
19, 8
11/7
No Lecture (Lab starts at 6pm)
NA
11/12
Cell Architecture: Cytoskeleton & Cell Junctions
11
11/14
No Lecture (Lab starts at 6pm)
NA
11/19
Mitosis, Cell Cycle Regulation, Meiosis and Recombination
7, 12
11/21
EXAM II (covers lectures 10/10 through 11/12)
13
11/26
Energy / ATP / Oxidation & Reduction
6
12/3
Glycolysis & Fermentation
6, 9
12/5
The Krebs Cycle
9
12/10
Electron Transport
9
12/12
Photosynthesis
10
12/17
FINAL EXAM (covers all the course material but emphasizes
last third of lectures)

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