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The Eternal Purpose of God

The Eternal Purpose of God

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Published by John Clements
The Thesis incorporates elements of Hebraic thought into a biblical theology of covenant, creation and community.

Thus, it seeks to express the message of Scripture according to its own priorities, using biblical rather than philosophical terminology, presenting the Bible‟s own message within the framework of a primarily Hebraic worldview.

To aid recognition of vital theological threads woven throughout the biblical narratives, the Thesis continuously develops a graphical “panorama” of the biblical narrative.
The Thesis incorporates elements of Hebraic thought into a biblical theology of covenant, creation and community.

Thus, it seeks to express the message of Scripture according to its own priorities, using biblical rather than philosophical terminology, presenting the Bible‟s own message within the framework of a primarily Hebraic worldview.

To aid recognition of vital theological threads woven throughout the biblical narratives, the Thesis continuously develops a graphical “panorama” of the biblical narrative.

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Published by: John Clements on Jan 24, 2012
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New Covenant International University & Theological Seminary 
THE ETERNAL PURPOSE OF GOD
 A Biblical Theology of Covenant, Creation and Community 
 A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty In candidacy for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Intercultural Studies
by 
 JOHN BENHAM CLEMENTS
LLANELLI, WALES
1
st
January, 2008
 
 
 ABSTRACT1.1
 
Thesis
1.1.1
 
TitleThe Eternal Purpose of God: a Biblical Theology of Covenant, Creation and Community 1.1.2
 
 Author  John Clements
1.2
 
Issue addressed
The Thesis incorporates elements of Hebraic thought into
a biblical theology of covenant, creation and community 
. Thus, it seeks to express the message of Scriptureaccording to its own priorities, using biblical rather than philosophical terminology,p
resenting the Bible‟s own message within the framewor 
k of a primarily Hebraic worldview.To aid recognition of vital theological threads woven throughout the biblical narratives, theThesis continuously develops a graphical
„panorama‟ of the biblical narrative
.
1.3
 
Research
1.3.1
 
Method and design
Research has been driven by the author‟s
 teaching of biblical theology. Originally, the thesis was conceived
 graphically
. The development of a line diagram, depicting a biblical
panorama or “big picture” overview of the narratives
of scripture, thus formed thefoundational step of research; the coherency of the evolving diagrammatic panorama effectively acting as a test of the coherency of the hypothesis.The diagram was subsequently presented in seminar format to Christian believers in both
East and West Africa, originally via blackboard, then using electronic „PowerPoint‟ slides.
Each presen
 tation and assessment of corresponding „feedback‟ prompted further research
of the themes and development of the thesis represented by the diagram.The final step involved presenting the thesis and diagram as an educational pamphlet(
not published
). Development of continuous explanatory prose demanded a far higher 
 
NCIU - MPhil. - Intercultural Studies
MPH5508 Thesisii
degree of coherency and grasp of subject matter, pushing the author towards further readingand prayerful meditation, in order to fully develop the thesis.1.3.2
 
Major findingsThe Bible was almost entirely composed by Jewish writers and an examination of its
 Jewish
or 
Hebraic roots
provides considerable fresh insight into the Christian faith and worldview
particularly in respect of 
covenant, community and creation.
Covenant
forms the dominant factor governing the biblical paradigm or worldview. The
„new covenant‟
inaugurated by the Messiah likewise forms the dominant factor governing the New Testament paradigm.Each biblical covenant is associated with a 
community 
—a „covenant community‟—
 whoreceive a vocation commensurate with the relationship into which they have been brought.The biblical view of 
creation
ultimately anticipates its global renewal, whereupon heavenis united in harmony with earth, God dwelling utterly amidst his people. En-route to thisfinality, the biblical worldview incorporates the bondage of creation to the effects of 
sin
andits partners: death, disease and decay. Amidst this corrupted creation, the vocation of the covenant community is to be anincarnate Messenger of Hope: both recipient and giver of New Life; a sign, symbol and
harbinger of creation‟s ultimate,
 glorious liberation
from bondage.1.3.3
 
Significance and value of findingsTraditional, post-Enlightenment theologies
i.e. reformed, dogmatic, systematic, critical,non-contextual etc.
having undergirded Western Christendom during the past twocenturies, are presently creaking under the strain of increasingly dominant post-modern andpost-colonial worldviews.In order for Christian faith and community to flourish within this hostile cultural climate, the challenge of review, re-evaluation and renewal needs to be faced, enabling Christian theology, praxis and culture to be released from the suffocating philosophical paradigms of  the Enlightenment.

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