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Michael Jackson - The Significance of His Thrilling Career

Michael Jackson - The Significance of His Thrilling Career

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Published by unibyte
ByteMusic.com - Do you love to sing? Do you find yourself singing along with your iPod music or whatever is playing on the radio at the moment? Or are you a more serious singer with career plans? The interesting fact about singing is that professionals and amateurs alike want to sing better when they enjoy singing. If this describes you then you’re in for a real treat because the information in this ebook was written just for people who want to sing better. The goal of this ebook is to give you essential information about singing so you show improvement within 90 days. http://www.ByteMusic.com
ByteMusic.com - Do you love to sing? Do you find yourself singing along with your iPod music or whatever is playing on the radio at the moment? Or are you a more serious singer with career plans? The interesting fact about singing is that professionals and amateurs alike want to sing better when they enjoy singing. If this describes you then you’re in for a real treat because the information in this ebook was written just for people who want to sing better. The goal of this ebook is to give you essential information about singing so you show improvement within 90 days. http://www.ByteMusic.com

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Categories:Types, Reviews
Published by: unibyte on Jan 27, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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10/09/2012

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 ==== ====Our Limited Time FREE 90 Day System Will Help You to Become a Better Singer. Do you love tosing? Then this FREE System is for you!http://www.ByteMusic.com ==== ====When I first heard the news that Michael Jackson had died I immediately dismissed it. I thought itwas a cruel rumor that was being circulated. I got into the elevator with a black woman who lookedvisibly shaken and I asked her did she hear about it. She confirmed that it was true. He waspronounced dead at 2:26 p.m. on June 25, 2009. As the elevator sank toward the ground floor, my heart sunk with it. Like most black people, I feltas though I had lost a childhood friend. Losing a childhood friend can be more painful than losing adistant relative because of the historical bond you share. When a childhood friend dies, a part ofyour life dies with them. Such was the case for me and millions of others who had the pleasure ofgrowing up with Michael Jackson. Unlike any artist in history, Michael Jackson was able to cast a wide net of popularity overgenerations of people which cut through genres, cultures, nations, races, and all ages. It was afeat that will likely never be accomplished again. His influence is readily seen in today's topcontemporary music artists like Usher, Justin Timberlake, Chris Brown, and Ne-Yo. They share some similarities, but they will never be on Michael Jackson's level. I've heard the term "superstar" used to describe Michael Jackson along with similar descriptionssuch as "megastar," and "worldwide superstar" because of his recognition around the globe.Those references fall short because they are too complex. He is simply the greatest entertainerthat ever lived. He's also the most underrated vocalist of our time. He picked up where James Brown left off with his pure, powerful soulfulness and unsurpasseddancing skills. James Brown had moves. Michael Jackson had moves and choreography. Hemesmerized white teenage audiences with greater effect than Elvis. Elvis had charm. MichaelJackson had charm and unprecedented energy. He crossed over and was embraced by whiteaudiences in a way that Prince had only dreamed of. Prince had crossover appeal. MichaelJackson had crossover appeal and successfully crossed over. Young children were also drawn toand excited by Michael Jackson and his music in an inexplicable way that no music artist has everbeen able to come close to. That's what made him the greatest. But now he's gone. Never to be forgotten, and never to be replaced. Gone are the possibilities fora comeback that so many of us were hoping for. Gone are the chances for musical, commercial,and social redemption. As strongly as I'm tempted to point out the derisive treatment of Michael Jackson over the yearsby white people I have to cautiously refrain, but his original fan base (and most loyal in the U.S.)
 
consisted of the black families who, at least visually, resembled his own. At a time when blackpride was wavering, Michael Jackson made every young black boy in America feel that they toocould be a Pop star and viewed as "cute"; if they had the requisite afro and psychedelic 70s attire. White people also loved Michael Jackson. They recognized and rewarded his extraordinary talentsand creativity when he was allowed to be the first black artist to have a video played on MTV; amove that positioned him as the King Of Pop and ignited record sales of Thriller, the best sellingalbum of all time. Michael Jackson is as much a part of their lives - and occupies as big of a space in their hearts -as he does in the hearts of most black people; however, it's the white media that has shownirreverence for the last decade by dogging him at every given chance. By choosing to focus on his eccentricities (to which Michael Jackson responded with his song,Leave Me Alone), prosecuting him in the court of public opinion after he was legally acquitted formolestation, and disparagingly referring to him as "Wacko Jacko," the white media certainlycontributed to his mounting stress over the years, and short-term exile from the U.S. Michael Jackson was not physically well, nor physically fit. We took for granted the amount ofpreparation, discipline, energy, and hard work that he put into being the greatest entertainer thatever lived. The trait of all professionals is how easy they make things look. Michael Jacksonperformances were well-rehearsed, and characterized by flawless precision and timing. He madethem look easy, but they were a physically demanding and often exhaustive undertaking; one thata younger, healthier Michael Jackson was conditioned to executing. The older, physically and mentally distressed Michael Jackson was never going to be able tohonor 50 performance dates. It would have been the equivalent of Michael Jordan coming back atthe age of 50 and trying to compete at the same (athletic) level in a playoff game; it's just notpossible. Drugs might make it seem possible, but only for a fleeting moment. Entertainers, like athletes, have a hard time letting go of what once was, in exchange for what nowis: a feeble body that can not generate the type of performance that the public has grownaccustomed to seeing. Usually when it happens you step-down. But Michael Jackson attempted tostep-up. Still carrying the distinction as perhaps the last black artist who can sell out a stadium, and beingpainfully aware of his increasing physical limitations, he attempted to cater to the desires of hisfiercely loyal fans just one more time. He would tour again and restore himself (and reputation) viathe platform on which he is most comfortable, and the one that launched his illustrious career: thestage. The This Is It Tour was set to begin in July, 2009. Michael Jackson (who had not performed on this level in over 8 years) knew what the fans wouldbe expecting: the old Michael Jackson. Like any polished professional who is aware of his brand,he attempted to deliver on those expectations. What medications/drugs he took (which may have jeopardized his health in order to honor those expectations) may never be known. 

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