Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
City Limits Magazine, May 1983 Issue

City Limits Magazine, May 1983 Issue

Ratings: (0)|Views: 30|Likes:
Cover Story: New York City's New Landlord, a City Limits Q & A with tax-foreclosed residential properties manager Joseph Shuldiner.

Other stories include Reverend Donald Sakano's opinion piece on the slow, drawn out death of the Section 8 housing program at the hands of the Reagan administration; Julia MacDonnell Chang on the racial divide between two new developments in the South Bronx; Simon Lerner and Susan Baldwin on the waiting lists for repairs at Mitchell-Lama housing and the Middle Income Residents Association; Susan Baldwin on the West Harlem Community Organization; Richard Schrader on organizing for conservation in preparation for further deregulation of the energy market by the government.
Cover Story: New York City's New Landlord, a City Limits Q & A with tax-foreclosed residential properties manager Joseph Shuldiner.

Other stories include Reverend Donald Sakano's opinion piece on the slow, drawn out death of the Section 8 housing program at the hands of the Reagan administration; Julia MacDonnell Chang on the racial divide between two new developments in the South Bronx; Simon Lerner and Susan Baldwin on the waiting lists for repairs at Mitchell-Lama housing and the Middle Income Residents Association; Susan Baldwin on the West Harlem Community Organization; Richard Schrader on organizing for conservation in preparation for further deregulation of the energy market by the government.

More info:

Published by: City Limits (New York) on Jan 27, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/27/2012

pdf

text

original

 
Contents.
Editorial
...
.
....
...
..
..
..
.
...
....
..
..........3 Opinion
Section
8:
R.I.P. .
...
.
......
.
..............
..4Small BuildingsNeed Protection
....
.
....
...
....
6
Letters..
..
.
..
...
..
.....
.
......
...
.
..
.
..
.
..
..
8
Short Term Notes
City Building ShutdownsChallenged
by
Suit
..
.....
.
....
..
......
....
10
The
UDAG
JerseyCity
Won't
Spend
.....
..
..
...
U
Homeless Shelter Plans Readied
...
.......
..
...
13
First Grants for Partnership
....
...
.
....
....
...
14
42nd St. Sale Looms
...
...
.
....
....
..
..
.
..
...
15
New
York's Newest Landlord..
...
...
..
..
.....
..
16
An interviewwith themanagerforNYC's 37,000
in
rem tenants.
The Troubled
New
Homes
of
the South Bronx
..
..
21
Has master builder EdLogue redivided parts
of
the South Bronx?
Who's Watching the Waiting Lists?
.....
..
...
..
.
26
A recentstudyand upcoming legislativehearingsraise theissue
of
monitoringthe city'smainstock
of
subsidized middle incomehousing.
Community Profile
Managing West Harlem
...
.
.........
..
...
..
..
28
People
West Harlem's Margaret McNeill
....
.....
.
....
32
Resources/Events..
.....
.
.........
...
.....
..
33
Energy
Organizing for Conservation
....
....
.
...
.
...
..
34
Organize!
Outdueling the Speculators.
.....
.
.......
...
..
36
Workshop...
..
.
....
...
....
.
....
.
.......
..
..38
The SouthBronx's Troubled New Homes / Page
21
?-
CITYLIMITS/May 1983
2
""
<
:E
<
o
<
WHCO Chairmall LeoFill alld A.
ui
.,(w/l Dir
e/
'
wr
Galien Kirklalld.
 
Volume
vm
Number 5
CilY
limilS
is
published ten times per year. monthly
except
double issues
in
June/July and
August/September,
by
theCity Limits CommunityInformationService.Incanonprofitolganization devoted to disseminating infonnation concerningneighborhood revitalization. The publication
is
sponsored
by
three olganizations. Thesponsor.;
are
:
Associalion
of
Neighborhood Housing Developers.
In
c
an
association
of
over
hYO
dozen community
based.nonprofithousing development groups. developing
and
advocatingprogramsforlowand moderate incomehousingandneighborhood stabilization.
Prall InslilultCenter
for
Community
and
Environ-mental Development.
atechnicalassistance and advocacy office offeringprofessionalplanningand ar chitecturalservicesto low andmoderate income community groups.The Center also analyzes andmonitors government policy and performance.
UrbanHomesteadingAssistance Board.
atechnical
assistance organizationprovidingassistancetolow
incometenant cooperatives
in
management
and
sweatequity rehabilitation.
City
limits
welcomes
comments
and
article contribu·tions.Pleaseincludeastamped. self-addressed envelope for return of manuscripts. Material
in
City
limits
doesnotnecessarilyreflect
the
opinion ofthesponsoringorganizations. Send correspondence to: CITYLIMITS.424West33rdStreet.NewYork. N.
Y.
10001.
Postmaster send change
of
addressto:City Limits.424
W.
33rd
St
.•
New
York
.N.
Y.
10001.
Second-class postage paidNew
York
.N.Y.
10001
CityLimi
ts
(lSSN 0199-0330)(
212
)239-8440Editor .
.................
.
......
TomRobbins Assistant Editor
.......
.
.......
Susan BaldwinMarketingDirector
.....•
.
.......
Jim MendellDesign andLayout..
............
LouisFulgoniCopyright
1983
.
All
Rights Reserved.Noportion
or
portionsofthisjournal
may
bereprinted withouttheexpresspermission
of
thepublishers.
No
Trades
in
Albany
Vital issues of tenants rights and neighborhood preservation will sooncome surging out of the the New
York
State legislature.
In
the
weeks
remaining of the 1983 regular session -with some observers predicting recess bymid-June and others July 4th -legislators will be weighing an extraordinarynumber of housing issues, from
J-51
to the Emergency Tenant Protection
Pet,
many of which are likely to become entangled with each other
in
negotiations.For starters, the future of New
York
City's
J-51
tax incentive program forhousing rehabis
by
no means assured. Thoughtful community people are
in
a bind: on the one hand renewal of
J-51
is essential to low income housingdevelopment, but
an
extension without structural reform will continue
an
unneeded and dangerous public subsidy for the
lUXUry
conversions and tenantharassment that have accelerated residential and commercial displacement.The Assembly has passed a watered-down reform bill supported byGovernor Cuomo and Mayor Koch, which extends
J-51
for four years with aformula for curtailment of benefits
to
for-profit projects which many considerstill to be too generous to developers. Even this version may not be passedby the State Senate, which remains as ever
in
the thrall of the real estateindustry. After months of stating that
J-51
was a local matter and that theSenate would pass whatever legislation the city adrninistration.wanted,Senate Housing Committee chairman John Daly changed his tune onceMayor Koch signed off on the Assembly bill, and started demanding furthersubstantial pro-real estate amendments.
Lately,
Daly has raised the ante even more by insistingthatthe Senatewill pass a
J-51
bill (which bill is unclear) only if the Assembly agrees to passa couple of pro-landlord measures. One bill sought for the trade wouldrestore the unlimited right of landlords (accidentally repealed last year) toevict a rent stabilized tenant when an apartmentissoughtfor theowner's "personal"use and has been strongly opposed
by
tenant groups. Anothermeasure would curb tenants' right to sublet, finally established after years ofcourt cases.Daly and his boss, Senate Majority Leader Warren Anderson, are thustrying to drive a wedge between organized tenants on the one hand, andnonprofit community organizations on the other who desperately need
J-51
extended to make their local low income housing projects affordable.Neither community organizations nor tenant groups can afford tofallforthis divisive ruse. There is an equal stake for both groups
in
protectingtenants' rights and providing new and rehabilitated affordable housing. Housing rehabilitated without assurances of adequate rent and tenure protectionscan only spell displacement and gentrification.And protecting the rights oftenants to remain
in
substandard housing is also only half a strategy.The joint efforts of tenants and community organizations to extend rentprotections to small buildings with less than six unitsisone current and
ex
citing example of the unity that this situation demands. That unity is beingtested
in
Albany this year.Itisessential that we make conscious efforts to mobilize both constituencies and work cooperatively to achieve the passageof crucial housing legislation this spring.
We
can hang together, or
we
cansurely hang separately.
Cover photos by:
Jim
Mendell (pickets
and
Shuldiner)
and
Barbara
Pacheco (Community Management building).
3 CITY LIMITS/May 1983

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->