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City Limits Magazine, October 1986 Issue

City Limits Magazine, October 1986 Issue

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Cover Story: Hurray for West Hollywood! By Gilda Haas.

Other stories include Errol T. Louis on bank closings causing a new form of redlining in low income neighborhoods; Bettina Cohen on the Emergency Assistance Rehousing Program and recruiting landlords to house the homeless; Doug Turetsky on the work of socially concerned banker Lyndon Comstock; Eleanor J. Bader on vastly wealthy philanthropist Leonard Stern; Lois Harr's book review of "Housing the Homeless" edited by Jon Erickson and Charles Wilhelm, and more.
Cover Story: Hurray for West Hollywood! By Gilda Haas.

Other stories include Errol T. Louis on bank closings causing a new form of redlining in low income neighborhoods; Bettina Cohen on the Emergency Assistance Rehousing Program and recruiting landlords to house the homeless; Doug Turetsky on the work of socially concerned banker Lyndon Comstock; Eleanor J. Bader on vastly wealthy philanthropist Leonard Stern; Lois Harr's book review of "Housing the Homeless" edited by Jon Erickson and Charles Wilhelm, and more.

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Published by: City Limits (New York) on Jan 27, 2012
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..
October1986
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2
CITY LIMITS
Odober
1986
C/q
l.imi~5
Volume
XI
Number 8
City Limits
is
published ten times per
year,
monthly except double issuesin
JunelJuly
and
AugustiSeptember
,by
the
City Limits
Community
Information Ser
vice
,
Inc
., a
nonprofitorganization
devoted to
disseminating information
con
cerning neighborhood revitalization.The
publication is sponsored
by
three
organizations.
The sponsors
are:
Association
for Neighborhood
and
Hous
ing Development
,
Inc.
,
an
association
of40 community-based, nonprofit
housing
development
groups, developing
and
advocating programs for low
and
moderateincome housing
and
neighborhoodstabilization
.
Pratt
Institute Center
for
Community
and
Environmental
Development,a
technicalassistance
and
advocacy office offeringprofessional
planning and architectural
services to low
and
moderate incomecommunity
groups.
The
Center alsoanalyzes
and monitors
government policy
and
performance.Urban
Homesteading Assistance
Board,a
technical assistance
organization pro
vidingassistance
to low
income
tenant
cooperatives in
management and sweatequity rehabilitation
.
Subscription
rates are:for
individuals
and
community
groups,$1510ne Year, $251Two Years;for
businesses, founda
tions,
banks
,
go
v
ernment
agencies
and
libraries
,$351
0ne
Year,$501Two Years. Low
income
,
unemployed
,$91
0ne
Year.City Limits welcomes
comments
and
article
contributions
.Please
include
a
stamped,
self-addressed
envelope
for re
turn
manuscripts
.Material in
City
Li
mitsdoesnot
necessarily reflect
the
opinion
of
the
sponsoring
organizations.
Sendcorrespondence
to: CITY LIMITS, 424West 33rd St., New
York
,
NY
10001.Second class postage paidNew York,
NY
10001City Limits [ISSN 0199-0330)(212) 239-8440Editor:
Annette Fuentes
Associate
Editor
:Doug Thretsky
Contributing
Editors: Peter Marcuse,Peggy Moberg,Jill Nelson,Tom Robbins
Production:
Chip Cliffe
Photographers:
Beverly
Cheuvront
,BillGoidellCopyright01986.All Rights Reserved.
No
portion or portions
of
this
journal maybe
reprinted without
the
express permis
sion
of
the
publishers.
City Limits is
indexed
in
the
AlternativePress
Index and the
Avery
Index
to Ar
chitectural
Periodicals.
FROM THE
EDITOR
What Goes Around, Comes Around
One
of
the
major paradoxes of work to change
this
city for
the
better,for
the
majority of those living here, is
that it
is
bound
to
be
fraught
withthe
most
extreme negativity
and
the most
sublime
positivism,
Thedown
side involves the necessary
and
realistic appraisals of just
howbadconditions
are,
how
agonizingly slow
the
wheels
of city bureaucracy
turn
and how
skewed towards
"the
haves" policies really are,
That
is
the
task
undertaken in
a
study done
by
the Community
Training
and
Resource Center
on the
exodus of
bank
offices from city neighborhoods
that don't
have enough affluent residents.
In one
of
this
issue's featurearticles, "Branch Closings:
The
New Redlining,"Errol Louis describes
the
CTRC
work,
in
which he
was involved, to
document the
flight of
banks
from
poor
city neighborhoods to
richer suburban
pastures. With
the
branch
offices go
needed
banking services
and
the
sense of stability
and
viability a
banklends
to its neighborhood.
The
results of
the study
are certainly disturbing: some
communities
have lost over half of
their bank
offices
in the past
decade, While
theCommunity
Reinvestment Act offers protection against
other bank
dis
investment
practices-denying
loans
and
mortgages-this
type
of cor
pinate
irresponsibility is more slippery
and
hard
to
halt
.Besides, mostof
the
damage
has
already
been
done, notes
the study
'S director,Margaret
Stix
.,
The
up
side to work
dedicated
to a just New
York
is
the hope that
springs eternally
in
people who
wage
the
good fight, The vision ofsomething better, of attainable alternatives
and
the
profound belief
thatother
motives besides profit
and
greed
can
direct
the
course of events.Lyndon Comstock is
such
a
person
,
in
the
unlikely guise of a banker,
who
aims to
turn
the investment and
banking world of
maximum
profits
on
its head. A profile of Comstock by Associate Editor Doug Thretskyshows that,
while
the
headlines
focus
onunscrupulous
investmentbankers trading
insider
information, there is a growing
number
like
this
Brooklyn
resident who
are as
concerned about the
social
impact
of
their
investments as
the
rate of return. Money
that
goes to
support apartheid
in
South
Africa or gentrification
in
New York,
can
be better spent, accord
ing
to
the
socially responsible investors,
without
sacrificing a
decentreturn on their
investments.
The bank that
Comstock seeks to found
would
be
an
important
source of alternative
funding
for
community
revitalization
and
a
model
for
other such
financial institutions
inthe
service of communities.
City Limits
applauds this
enterprise
and
thevision
of
an
alternative to
the
redlining
and
bank
flight
it
represents.D
"*'~
~
X
-
523
 
INSIDE
FEATURES
Branch
Closings:
The
New Redlining 10A
new twist on an
old
practice by
banksthat
deprivecertain ill-fated neighborhoods of
needed
financialservices.
Hurray
for West Hollywood
16
California's newest
and
most
controversiallittle cityis a strong
hold
of community,
senior
and
gay rightsactivists.
DEPARTMENTS
FromtheEditorWhat
Goes
Around,
Comes
Around
.......
2Neighborhood
NewsstandFraud
Across America
..................
4Letters
..................................
5
Short
Term NotesFair Housing Victory
.........
...........
6SRO Bill Draws
the
Lines
........
........
6City Debtors Still Dealing
...............
7
Neighborhood NotesBronx
........
..
..
..
.
...
....
·.········
8
Brooklyn
.............................
8
Manhattan
...
......
......
..
..
.........
9
Queens
.........
........
.....
..
......
·9Building BlocksExterior Painting .. . . .. . . . .. . ... .......
15
Program
FocusRecruiting Landlordsto House
the
Homeless .
..
....
..
...........
.....
22PeopleLyndon Comstock Banks
on
Social Goals
....
.
..............
..
..
..
24PipelineLeonard Stern
and
the
Homeless
........
26ReviewsHomeless
in
America
..
.........
....
...
29Workshop
...............................
31
Odober
1986CITY LIMITS 3
RedlininglPage
10
West Hollywood/Page
16
Stern's Shelter/Pa

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