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City Limits Magazine, May 1987 Issue

City Limits Magazine, May 1987 Issue

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Cover Story: Questions Go Begging in Koch's Homeless Shelter Plan by Beverly Cheuvront.

Other stories include Liz Koch on the damage to the community done by the corporate development of MetroTech in Brooklyn; Joe Center and Wendy Grover on the benefits of allowing neighborhood residents to plan the future of local city-owned property instead of having the buildings auctioned off; Miriam Bensman on Bronx superintendent Ursel Crutchfield and public school heating in the area.
Cover Story: Questions Go Begging in Koch's Homeless Shelter Plan by Beverly Cheuvront.

Other stories include Liz Koch on the damage to the community done by the corporate development of MetroTech in Brooklyn; Joe Center and Wendy Grover on the benefits of allowing neighborhood residents to plan the future of local city-owned property instead of having the buildings auctioned off; Miriam Bensman on Bronx superintendent Ursel Crutchfield and public school heating in the area.

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Published by: City Limits (New York) on Jan 27, 2012
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May1987
$2
BROOKLYN'SHIGH-TECHGIVEAWAY
D
SUPBISCHOOL
D
SOUTHBRONXPLANUNVBLED
D
MACSCORECARD
D
 
2
CITY LIMITS
May
1987
eitv
"imi~s
Volume
XII
Number5
City
Limits
is
publishedten
times
per
year.
monthlyexcept double issues
inJune
/July
and
August
/
September.
by
the
City
Limits
Community
Information
Ser
vice. Inc
. a
nonprofit
organization
de
voted
to
disseminating information
con
cerningneighborhood
revitalization.
Thepublication
is
sponsored
by
three
organizations.
The sponsors
are:
Association
for
Neighborhood
and
Hous
ing
Development.
Inc
an association
of
40
community-based.nonprofit housingdevelopment
groups.
developing and
advocating programs
for
low
andmoderateincome housing and neighborhoodstabilization
.
Pratt
Institute Center
for
Community
and
Environmental Development
.a
technicalassistanceand
advocacy
office offering
professional
planning and architectural
services
to low
andmoderate incomecommunity groups
.
The Center alsoanalyzes and monitors
government
pol
icy
andperformance
.
Urban
Homesteading Assistance
Board
.a
technical assistance organization
pro
vidingassistance
to low
incometenantcooperatives
in
management
and
sweatequity rehabilitation
.
Subscription
rates
are: for'
individualsand community
groups.
$15/
0ne
Year.
$25
/
Two
Years; for
businesses.
founda
tions
.
banks.
governmentagencies
and
libraries. $35
/
0ne
Year.
$50
/Two Years.Low
income. unemployed.
$9
/
0ne
Year.City
Limits
welcomes commentsand
arti
cle
contributions.Please include
a
stamped. self-address
.
ed
envelope
for re
turn manuscripts.
Material
in
City
Limits
does
not
necessarily
reflect
theopinion
of
the sponsoring
organi~ations.
Sendcorrespondence
to: CITY LIMITS. 40
Prince
St..New York.
NY
10012.
Second
class postage
paid
New
York
.
NY
10001City
Limits
(ISSN0199-0330)(212)
925-9820Editor:
Beverly
CheuvrontManagingEditor
:Doug
Thretsky
ContributingEditors:
Peter.
Marcuse.
Peggy Moberg. Tom
Robbins
Production:Chip
Cliffe
Photographer
:Bill
GoidellCopyright
©1987.All
Rights
Reserved.No
portion
or
portions
of
thisjournal
may
be
reprintedwithout the express permission
of
thepublishers.
City
Limits
is
indexed
in
theAlternative
Press
Index and the
Avery
Index
to Ar
chitectural
Periodicals.
Cover
photo
by
Bill
Goidall
EDITORIAL
Permanent
Solutions
Officialssay
some
27,000
people spend their
nights
in
New
York
Cityshelters; advocates
count another
35,000
to
75,000
living
on
the
streets.However difficult it is to take
thecensus
of
the
homeless,
onething
iscertain -
this scandalcanno
longer be ignored.Is
the
solution
to
build
large,
temporary
sheltersfast, oris itto create
smaller
facilities
and
renovate
in
rem
buildings
to provide
apartmentsthat can
be
used
for
permanent
housing?
These
choices are at
theheart
of adebate
spawned
by MayorKoch's
plan
to create a
network
of
new
shelters for
homeless
families
and
individuals.
A thought-provoking search for
solutions
may
bethe bestthing
to come
out
of
the
administration's
plan
as
public
officials, com
munities,
developers, social service providers, advocates
and
the
homeless themselves analyze
the
factors
that
have forcedso
many
of
our
citizens onto
the
streets.
The only
logical
and
acceptable
solution
lies
in the
development
of
permanent
housing.
To
continue
to warehouse
peoplein
oversized sheltersis
not
only
inhumane,it
also is extremelyshort-sighted.
It
will
do
littleto provide
the
homeless
withthesense
of stabilitythey
need
toreorganize
their
lives; it will
not
contributeto
the
well-being of neighborhoods
where
these facilities
would
be located;
but
most
essential,it
will
do nothing
to alleviate
the
shortageof low-income
units that
is
the root
cause
of homelessness.
The
mayor's
plan
is seriously flawed.
If
the
Koch
administration
is
committed
to
stanchingthe
flow of
homeless
people,
itwilladopt the
well-reasoned
solutions that
are
proposed
byadvocateslike
thetask
force formed by
Manhattan
Borough
President
David Dinkins.
We
also agree
with
those
who support
a
combination
of efforts toconfront
and
cope
with
homelessness. Amongthose,
we
add our ownconcernthat rent
regualtion laws,
which
expirethis
month, notonly
bepreserved
but
strengthened
withsuch
measuresas anti-warehousinglaws,
tougher
conversion restrictions
and
morestringent
anti
-eviction
rules
to prevent future homelessness.
We
are, however,
heartened
by a mayoral
promise
to
identify
the
risk
factors
that
place
people
in
dangerof
becoming
homeless.
One
factor Mayor Koch
should
put
atthe
top
of his list is displacement:Low
incomepeople
who
live
in the
path
of
unbridled
real estate develop
ment
face a
high
risk of
becoming
homeless.
An example
is
evident inthe
story
on
MetroTech (see page8).MetroTech
will
directly
displace
200
residents,
with
a
ripple
effect
that
will
send
shock
waves
throughout
many adjacent Brooklyn neighborhoods.
This
high-tech government giveaway
will
increase
the
pressure
onthe
remaining
low
income
residents of neighboring com
munities,
especially Fort Greene
and
Clinton
Hill,
where
gentrificationis just reaching
high
gear. Mid
income
formerMetroTech residents arebeingoffered
the "opportunity"
to
buycondosin
Prospect Heights, aprivatedevelopment
in
former
in
rem
buildingsthat
is being renovatedby Ratner-Kessler Realty -
principals inthesame
firm
that
is developing MetroTech.
That
project is
certain
to set offyet
another
wave of
displacement
in
Prospect Heights
and
CrownHeights(see
City
Limits,February, 1986).
Multiply the
effects of MetroTech
displacement
by
thehundreds
oflarge
development
projects
that
receive
theendorsement
-as well as
the
subsidies
-of
the
Koch
administration,
and
we
can
see
where
agreat deal of
homelessness
begins.
OB.C.
*1(
4n
 
INSIDE
FEATURES
City Incentives
Solder
Brooklyn's Silicon Valley 8Can high-tech survive
in
downtown
Brooklyn? Cityofficials
think
so,
and
they are
helping
the MetroTechproject
with
a generous assortment of subsidies. But
what
about
the
people
and
businesses
that
are being forced to move out?
Questions
Go Begging
in
Koch's Homeless
Shelter
Plan
12
The
mayor's
plan
to
build
20 new homeless sheltersis
hurtlingdown the
fast-tracktoward
the
Board ofEstimate despite almost universal disapproval.Where are thefacts
and
figures to back
up
Koch'sproposals?
DEPARTMENTS
From
the
EditorPermanent
Solutions
...................
2
Short
Term Notes
South
Bronx Rising
.............
......
.
4
Congress Tackles Housing Bills.
...
....
..
.
4
Where the
MAC
Money Went
............
5
Citizen Suits for
the
Environment
.........
5
Neighborhood NotesBronx
................................
6Brooklyn
..
.........................
..
6
Manhattan
............................
7
Queens
..
...
.
......
.
..
........
.
.......
7
City ViewsCity-Owned Property: Source of Quick Cash orNeighborhood Jobs
and
Service?
.........
17
PipelineSuper
School
.........................
20Building BlocksA Look at Windows
..
.
................
22Workshop
...............................
23
May
1987 CITY LIMITS 3
Mayor's
Shelter Plan/
Page
12

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