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Some Vocabulary

Some Vocabulary

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Published by Jordan Aguilar

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Published by: Jordan Aguilar on Jan 29, 2012
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04/18/2014

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strike down
 
 phrasal verb
 
1 a strike (someone) down :
to make (someone) unable to work, act, or function in the usual way ² usually used as (be) struck down She was struck down by an injury at the height of her athletic career. 
1
 
b strike (someone) down :
to cause (someone) to die suddenly ² usually used as (be) struck down He was struck down by a heart attack at age55. 
2 strike (something) down
or 
strike down (something)
chiefly US, law 
:
to say officially that (something) is no longer legally valid  The board struck down the appointment.  The Supreme Court struck down the law. 
Honoring Veterans Day  
Today, we at The Heritage Foundation are proud to honor Veterans Day by pausing to remember the men and women in uniformwho serve this country. They are some of the finest this nation has to offer. Among those who have served throughout the years, the recipients of the Medal of Honor (MOH) deserve our utmost respect and admiration. They wear this august award for those who did not come home. They never refer to themselves as "winners" but seethemselves as caretakers of the Medal of Honor for all who also served in harm's way in defense of freedom.The Medal of Honor is the highest award given to an American military service member who has shown extreme courage and intrepidity during combat.We at The Heritage Foundation would like to take the opportunity on this special day to introduce you to a foundation devoted exclusively to perpetuating the legacy of these heroes and their notion of service above self.The Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation and its Educational Curriculum are an invaluable resource for Heritage and for ournation. Teaching lessons in character, the Foundation holds in its resources short video living biographies of over 100 recipients of the Medal of Honor. These testimonials provide the basis for a six-part curriculum that teaches students how to better understand and emulate the virtues of courage, integrity, sacrifice, commitment, citizenship and patriotism in their own lives.The interdisciplinary character development resource, "Medal of Honor: Lessons of Personal Bravery and Self-Sacrifice," uses theoral histories of Medal of Honor recipients to convey to students that not only in military circumstances, but in everyday life,everyone can demonstrate courage and sacrifice. The lessons are intended for use across grade levels using a wide variety of teaching methods. The content is appropriate for all students in any school setting and encourages the use of critical thinking and collaboration skills.This MOH Character Development Program is a research-based teaching strategy using vignettes that allow the participants to seeand hear the events directly from the Medal of Honor recipient's perspective and in their own words. To see a sample of this resource,go towww.cmohedu.org. Above the log in, you can view one of the overview videos "In Their Own Words." You can alsowatchMOH  recipient Clarence Sasser and hear how a medic on a mission saved so many lives in the jungles of Vietnam. Students connect the lessons to their own lives through small and whole group strategies and discover "what values can I apply to mylife?" This resource curriculum does not glorify war. In contrast, it asks students to create their own definitions of courage, integrity,sacrifice, commitment, citizenship, and patriotism. The Program helps students acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to positively direct their social and civic interactions and to preserve our democratic society.The Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation's target goals and strategies include:
 
y
 
 Increase students' understanding of the Medal of Honor and the 6 values associated with it: courage, commitment, integrity,sacrifice, citizenship and patriotism.
y
 
 Increase academic engagement 
y
 
 Improve school culture and climate
y
 
 Increase student achievement 
 
 To quote an educator using the program, "Just...press play; you will immediately know the importance of educating our youth about the values these men represent." And from a student: "Act like everyone is watching, even if no one is." 
vanish
 
Y§Q
 
verb [no object] 
 
inflected forms:
vanishes; vanished; vanishing 
 
1
 
:
to disappear entirely without a clear explanation My keys mysteriously vanished.  The missing girl vanished without a tracea year ago.  The papers seem to have 
vanished into thin air 
.
2 :
to stop existing  Dinosaurs vanished from the face of the earth millions of years ago. The practice has all but vanished. [=the practice is very rarenow]  
treatment 
 
WULWPQW
 
noun
 
 plural 
treatments
 
1
[noncount] 
:
the way that you think of and act toward someone or something  We don¶t deserve such rude treatment. [=we don't deserve to be treated so rudely]  The principal's daughter received special/preferential treatment from teachers. [=teachers were kinder to and less strict with the principal'sdaughter than with other students]  We want to ensure equal treatment for everyone.  The law requires humane treatment of prisoners. 
2 a
[noncount] 
:
the way that you deal with or discuss a subject  It's a complicated issue that requires careful treatment.  A five-minute news report onthe subject does not allow for depth oftreatment. [=does not allow the subject to be dealt with in a way that is complete, thorough, etc.]  Thebook's treatment of this important issue is unimpressive. 
2 b
[count] 
:
something that deals with or discusses a subject  Previous treatments of this topic have ignored some key issues.  aninteresting treatment  
3 :
something that deals with a disease, injury, etc., in order to make someone feel better or become healthy again
:
medical care [noncount]  The patient required immediate medical treatment.  She is receiving treatment for cancer.  a treatment facility [=a place where you can get medical care] [count]  The drug has been approved as a treatment for AIDS.  cancer treatments 
4
[count] 
:
something that you use or do to feel and look healthy or attractive Mud is sometimes used as a skin treatment.  She went to a spa for abeauty treatment. 
5 :
a process in which a chemical or other substance is put on or in something in order to protect it, preserve it, clean it, etc. [count]  Aspecial treatment is used to kill bacteria in water.  Thistreatment will protect the wood from rotting.[noncount]  The instruments are sterilized by treatment with alcohol.  a waste/sewage treatment plant  
hiatus
 
KDHWV
 
noun
 
 plural 
hiatuses
 Meaning:
:
a period of time when something (such as an activity or program) is stopped [count]  The band is making an album again after a 5-year hiatus.[noncount]  (US) The television network put the show 
on hiatus
 [=it stopped broadcasting the show] for several months. = The show went on hiatus for several months. 
How President Obama Killed Thousands of Jobs 
 If Americans needed any further proof that the Obama Administration is one of the most political on record, or that, for all the recent demagoguing, it really cares only about re-election, not about job creation, then you need look no further than its cynical Keystone XL oil pipeline decision last week.
 
Over the last several months, radical environmentalists along with Hollywood celebrity activists descended on the White House in protest, urging President Barack Obama to block the construction of the $7 billion pipeline that would bring in more than 700,000barrels of oil per day from Alberta, Canada, to the Texas Gulf coast. Last week, they got their wish.The Obama Administration on Thursdayannounced that it would delay a decisionon the pipeline until after the 2012 election. Insiding with his leftist environmentalist, big Hollywood base, President Obama's ambition is nakedly apparent, as is his total disregard for the 14 million unemployed Americans sitting on the sidelines, waiting for Washington to get out of the way so they canget back to work. And it also shows that for him, politics is more important than achieving true energy independence for the United  States. And here's why: The Keystone pipeline would have done what the President's hundreds of billions of dollars in stimulus spending failed to do. It would have created thousands of jobs (tens of thousands, by some predictions), while generating$5.2 billion in property tax revenuefor Montana, South Dakota, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, and Texas. And it would have done it all with private dollars--not taxpayer dollars.The kicker is that despite all the hoopla from the enviro-celebrity protests, this pipeline should have been anything but controversial,even by the Obama Administration's own findings. Heritage's Nicolas Lorisexplains:
 
 Radical environmentalists act as if this is the first oil pipeline being built in the United States. We have 50,000 miles of oil pipeline inthis country that have provided massive economic benefits with minimal environmental harm. In short, building the Keystone XL pipeline is nothing new, and it¶s one of the most environmentally sensible ways to transport oil. Even the Obama Administration determined it to be safe when the State Department¶s recent Environmental Impact Statement found that the pipeline would pose few environmental risks. Another important point is that even if the Keystone pipeline isn't constructed in the United States, the resource will still be tapped,and it's going to head elsewhere. Heritage's David Kreutzer explains that the development of Canada's oil sands will be slowed (thereby increasing its cost), and it will be diverted to non-U.S. consumers, meaning that the Canadian oil will be shipped acrossthousands of miles of ocean to Chinese refineries. Kreutzer'sadmonition to the Obama Administration
 
 So, block the XL pipeline if you think the environment will be better served by shipping Canadian oil an extra 6,000 miles across the Pacific in oil-consuming super tankers and then refining it in less-regulated Chinese refineries. In addition, be aware that replacingthe Canadian oil means the U.S. also must import more oil by tankers, which are less efficient than pipelines.The facts, though, don't matter to environmentalist activists. They don't matter to certain celebrities, and now they apparently don't matter to the Obama Administration, either. Evidently, neither do jobs or energy independence. Following the President's decision,actor Robert Redford applauded Obamaand said, "This is American democracy at its best: a president who listens to the voice of the people and shows the courage to do what's right for the country." No, Mr. Redford, you're wrong. When the President puts his jobover those of tens of thousands Americans, that is politics and a presidency at its worst.
 
revive
 
UYDY
 
verb
 
inflected forms:
revives; revived; reviving 
 
1 a
[with object] 
:
to make (someone or something) strong, healthy, or active again The doctors were trying to revive the patient. [=to make theunconscious patient conscious again]  Visiting my old house has revived [=brought back]childhood memories.  The water revived [=refreshed] theflowers.  The success of the movie has revived her career.  The government is trying to revive the economy.  Our spirits were revived by hisenthusiasm. 
1
 
b
[no object] 
:
to become strong, healthy, or active again The store's business is beginning to revive. 
[with object] 
:
to bring (something) back into use or popularity  The family is trying to revive an old custom. 
3
[with object] 
:
to arrange to have (an old play, opera, etc.) performed in front of an audience He has decided to reviveMolière¶s Tartuffe. 
The Fall of the USSR and the Debate over Russia 
Twenty years ago, the world watched the Soviet Union fall. The regime that was "planted by bayonets," as President Ronald Reaganonce described it, did not take root, and ultimately the empire that once walled itself off from the West with an Iron Curtain could not shield its people from seeing the shining light of democracy. Next Tuesday, when the Republican presidential candidates come together to discuss foreign policy and national securityin a debate presented by The Heritage Foundation and American Enterprise Institute on CNN, they should remember the lessons that the fall of the USSR taught us, but they should also look ahead to the challenges that remain in Russia and around the world today. Chief among those challenges are those brought about by the Obama Administration's pursuit of a "reset" in relations with Russia.

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