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Pharma Finance 2008 in Italy Part Two Invention Innovation Perspectives

Pharma Finance 2008 in Italy Part Two Invention Innovation Perspectives

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Published by ogangurel
© Ogan Gurel (All Rights Reserved)

Pharma Finance 2008 In Italy - Part Two Invention, Innovation Perspectives
Posted by Ogan Gurel MD MPhil at 5 June 2008, 12:00 AM and is filed under Biotechnology,Innovation,Pharmaceuticals,Medical Nanotech
Since the Renaissance (which, by the way, was invented in Florence), Italy has been an extraordinarily inventive nation. Italians are among the most original and creative people on this planet. As is well appreciated, “made in Italy” is a mark of quality and style.
More significantly, “invented in Italy” could well be the moniker for much of what we take for granted in our modern world. Radio communication (Guglielmo Marconi), the atom bomb (Enrico Fermi), double-entry bookkeeping (Luca Pacioli), opera and many more remarkable yet now routine ideas were invented by Italians.

Indeed, Italians have not uncommonly been described by their fellow Europeans as being “slightly crazy” in deference to the very Italian ability to think just a bit differently than others. The invention of a new world is what only an Italian such as Christopher Columbus could do.

This uniquely Italian problem – invention without innovation – has two major consequences: economic stagnation and psychic disappointment. It has also given rise to the significant emigration of inventive talent out of Italy. There is a reason why Marconi, for example, went to England, Fermi went to the U.S. and Columbus reached America via Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain.

http://www.linkedin.com/in/ogangurel
© Ogan Gurel (All Rights Reserved)

Pharma Finance 2008 In Italy - Part Two Invention, Innovation Perspectives
Posted by Ogan Gurel MD MPhil at 5 June 2008, 12:00 AM and is filed under Biotechnology,Innovation,Pharmaceuticals,Medical Nanotech
Since the Renaissance (which, by the way, was invented in Florence), Italy has been an extraordinarily inventive nation. Italians are among the most original and creative people on this planet. As is well appreciated, “made in Italy” is a mark of quality and style.
More significantly, “invented in Italy” could well be the moniker for much of what we take for granted in our modern world. Radio communication (Guglielmo Marconi), the atom bomb (Enrico Fermi), double-entry bookkeeping (Luca Pacioli), opera and many more remarkable yet now routine ideas were invented by Italians.

Indeed, Italians have not uncommonly been described by their fellow Europeans as being “slightly crazy” in deference to the very Italian ability to think just a bit differently than others. The invention of a new world is what only an Italian such as Christopher Columbus could do.

This uniquely Italian problem – invention without innovation – has two major consequences: economic stagnation and psychic disappointment. It has also given rise to the significant emigration of inventive talent out of Italy. There is a reason why Marconi, for example, went to England, Fermi went to the U.S. and Columbus reached America via Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain.

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Published by: ogangurel on Nov 17, 2008
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06/16/2009

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Thinking about Life Sciences
http://blog.aesisgroup.com
Thursday, June 05, 2008
Pharma Finance 2008 In Italy - Part Two Invention, InnovationPerspectives
Since the Renaissance (which, bythe way, was invented in Florence),Italyhas been an extraordinarilyinventivenation. Italians are amongthe most original and creative people on this planet. As is well appreciated, “made inItalyis a mark of qualityand style.More significantly, “invented in Italy” could well be the moniker for much of what we take for granted in ourmodern world. Radio communication (Guglielmo Marconi), the atom bomb (Enrico Fermi), double-entrybookkeeping (Luca Pacioli), opera and manymore remarkable yet nowroutine ideas were invented byItalians.Indeed, Italians have not uncommonlybeen described bytheir fellowEuropeans as being “slightlycrazy” indeference to the veryItalian abilityto think just a bit differentlythan others. The invention of a newworld iswhat onlyan Italian such as Christopher Columbus could do.This uniquelyItalian problem – invention without innovation – has two major consequences:economicstagnation and psychic disappointment. It has also given rise to the significant emigration of inventive talent outof Italy. There is a reason whyMarconi, for example, went to England, Fermi went to the U.S.and Columbusreached America via Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain.
Pharma Finance 2008: Fostering Innovation
Pharma Finance 2008 was recentlyarranged not necessarilyto showcase Italian ingenuityand invention (of which there is plenty) but more to foster the partnerships and collaborations necessaryfor innovation.Government-sponsored business gatherings are often premised by“look at our great stuff and give us funding”.Here in Rome, the goal was more imaginativelyalong the lines of “we have great ingenuityhere.Howcan wework together to make it happen?” The conference was also about openingup local entrepreneurs to thepossibilities of partnership. Asenior conference organizer told me:
Italians are very proud of their discoveries. It’s very personal for them. They hold their ideas quite close to their heart.Such an attitude can make it difficult to form the necessary collaborations – for example, giving up majority control toa venture capitalist – or other partnerships that are necessary for success.
Another conference official summed it up pithilywhen he noted that:
In Italy, it’s not impossible to have someone like a Michelangelo or even several Michelangelos. But how do youinnovate around or commercialize something so precious? That is the challenge.
Scrambler Therapy: An Example ofCross-Border Innovation
Professor Giuseppe Marineo of the “Tor Vergata” Universityin Rome was frustrated. Marineo had invented anewapproach to treating visceral pain (the sort of intractable,deep neuropathic pain that arises,for example,from abdominal cancers). His frustration stemmed from an inabilityto bring this revolutionarytechnology(which he called “scrambler therapy”) to market.Instead of using conventional pharmacological pain killers or interventional surgerysuch as neurolysis,
Thinkingabout Life Sciences: Pharma Finance 2008 In Italy- Part Two In... http://blog.aesisgroup.com//2008/06/05/pharma-finance-2008-part-two-i...1 of 2 11/17/2008 12:29 AM

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