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Strahlenfolter - Millimeter Waves and Mind Control - Www-sonic-net

Strahlenfolter - Millimeter Waves and Mind Control - Www-sonic-net

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Published by: stop-organized-crime on Feb 06, 2012
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Home Aluminum ArchiveBookReviewsDentistryEconomicsEditor's LifeEnvironmentForumHistoryISFRLawLinksMedicineNewsNutritionSurveysWater Filters
Millimeter Waves and Mind Control
 Alan Yu 3-97 News Post
From: AlanYu AlanYu@prodigy.netNewsgroups: alt.mindcontrolSubject: Freedom of privacy & thoughtsDate: Sat, 22 Mar 1997Dear Readers,
I have stated that there is nothing can hide in the mind control surveillance system because these operatorsare using the state of art remote watching technology. Now, I found more information to prove what I havestated is correct. I would show readers such kind of information below:(attachment)--"New Scientist", Nov. 5, 1995 supplement (London, UK)No Where to HideIf you want to see the future of surveillance, take a trip into the world of millimetre waves and the videocameras that are sensitive to them. People are stripped of their clothes and become featureless, luminoushumanoids. Silhouetted against their bodies and suspended as if by magic, hang coins, buckles, pens andkeys. Cars are dark and sinister, although their hot radiator grills are bright. Only the steel in reinforcedconcrete shows up, so buildings look more like cages of copper pipes and electricity cables than homesand offices. There is little privacy in the world revealed by the millimetre-wave camera. Sitting rooms,bedrooms, bathrooms and lavatories all merge into one open space. People sit in their cages watchingwarm boxes, others sleep while suspended a few centimetres above the floor.The images make an apt metaphor for the brave new digital world of electronic surveillance. It is a worldwhere there will be nowhere to hide, nor anywhere to hide anything. There are already devices under development that will see through walls and strip-search suspects from a distance, looking under their clothes and inside their bodies. Individuals may be identified by their unique smells and tracked down, or "recognised" electronically, even before they have had time to complete a crime. And thanks to cheap digitalvideo cameras and powerful new search algorithms, individuals will be tracked by computers. There will beno anonymity even in the once welcoming crowds. Millimetre waves sit in the electromagnetic spectrumbetween the infrared and microwaves. They are emitted by anything that contains water, especially if it iswarm. The human body is an excellent source, and it stands out like a beacon at these frequencies."Millimetre waves are incredibly useful," says Steve Bohrer, an electrical engineer at Millitech, a company inMassachusetts that has spent 10 years developing cameras that can spot them. They pass straight throughany nonconducting material-this includes almost all clothing and most types of building material, he says.Metals are poor emitters, while dielectric materials such as plastics, ceramics, plastic explosives andpowdered drugs lie somewhere in between. The amount of millimetre wave radiation that any of thesematerials emits also depends on their temperature.Like visible and infrared light, millimetre waves can be focused to form an image. "It's not difficult. All youneed is a plastic lens," explains Bohrer. What is more difficult is detecting this image once it has beenformed.In a conventional video camera, light is turned into an electrical signal by sensors known as charge coupleddevices (CCDs). An array of CCDs at the camera's focal plane generates the electronic signal that createsa picture on a monitor. The more sensors in the array, the finer the camera's resolution, so an importantfactor is the size of each CCD and hence the number that can be crammed into the array. Most home videocameras have thousands. But CCDs cannot be used to pick up millimetre waves. Instead radio antennasare needed detect the radiation, and the tiny currents induced in the antennas must be amplified into a clear electronic signal. Such devices tend to be relatively bulky.The trick that Millitech has pulled off is to develop a way of making antennas only two or three millimetresacross and then assembling 256 of them into a two- dimensional array. At a distance of a metre or so thecamera can resolve objects a few millimetres across. Like a conventional video camera, the array takes 30pictures per second. The result is a real-time, moving image of the world in millimetre waves.Millitech's two prototype cameras can easily spot concealed metal knives and guns against the brightbackground of the bearer's body if the temperature of an object is known, it is also possible to identify thematerial it is made from, by assessing the brightness of the image. Since most concealed objects andpackages are kept close to the body, their temperature can be estimated fairly accurately losing thistechnique, crystalline substances such as sugar or powdered drugs can be identified clearly, although it isnot possible to distinguish between the two.By 1997, Millitech expects to have a millimetre-wave camera on sale for around $10 000, and a rugged
 
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portable version for $80 000.To complement its camera, Millitech is developing computer software that will scan images produced by thecamera and alert a human operator if it spots something suspicious. Fooling the computer will not be easy. "Isuppose you could hide a gun inside a hot water bottle filled with water at body temperature." suggestsBohrer. "But the system would still pick up the rubber bottle." The only way to beat it will be to hide objectsinside the body. The Millitech camera could be a voyeur's delight. At close range, males and females can beeasily distinguished, says Bohrer. The intensity of the millimetre waves that human flesh emits depends onits temperature. A man's genitals are slightly cooler than the rest of the body so they appear darker. Bohrer says that the computerized scanning system will safeguard people's privacy by doing away with the need for routine human surveillance.While millimetre-wave cameras ruffle through pockets and clothes, microwave imaging devices will lookinside the human body for contraband hidden in even more intimate places (see "The Pocket Radar Revolution, "New Scientist", 12 August). Developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory inCalifornia, these devices comprise two tiny radars that broadcast microwave impulses and listen for thereflections. Each radar controls its range by briefly opening its "ears" a short time after each pulse isbroadcast, ignoring echoes from nearer or more distant objects. This effectively creates a shell around theradar, which typically has a radius of a few metros. By using two radars with shells that overlap, and varyingthe size of each shell, it is possible to map an entire volume of space.Such devices have enormous potential for surveillance. They could make strip-searches a thing of the past,for example. To a trained operator, foreign objects inside the body will show up as easily as those outside. And because microwaves pass easily through walls and doors, similar systems could be used to mount adiscreet surveillance operation. The radar set should cost only a few dollars to assemble. It is already littlebigger than a bar of soap, and could be made much smaller. Only the computing power to assemble theimage will be expensive and bulky.Further down the electromagnetic spectrum, the military electronics manufacturer Raytheon has come upwith a way of detecting metal objects using radio waves with wavelengths of a few metros. idea is that theradiation will excite electrons in a metal object which will radiate energy as they settle back into a lower energy state. The intensity and duration of this secondary radiation will depend on the size and shape of theobject. Raytheon hopes to build a detector that bathes people with radio waves, and matches the secondarysignal that this produces against a library of radio signatures from objects such as handguns and knives. For the moment, however, it is not clear how accurately this can be done. Artificial sniffers that will identify us by our smell are another technology that is appearing on the horizon. Oneday such scent sensors could be as common as the video cameras that have sprouted over the past fewyears in city, streets, over road junctions, and inside shopping centers, airports and railway stations. "If youbuild new shopping mall, you could have sniffers all over the place," predicts George Dodd, a researcher with the Highlands Scientific Research Group at the Craig Dunain Hospital in Inverness, and theacknowledged father of the electronic nose. The sniffers could monitor how often an individual visits a store,identify known shoplifters as they enter and alert security staff if necessary. "You could detect intruders in anoffice, even identify them," Dodd claims.Police forces in Holland, Germany and Hungary have extensive databanks of human smells taken withswabs from crime scenes, which they use to set sniffer dogs on the track of the culprit.With electronic noses, however, everybody's smell could be stored on computer, says Dodd. In future, smellcould be used as evidence of a person's identity much as fingerprints and DNA tests are today.Now let's see the important information below if we use the millimetre waves cameras:"People are stripped of their clothes and become featureless, luminous humanoids. Silhouetted againsttheir bodies and suspended as if by magic, hang coins, buckles, pens and keys. Cars are dark and sinister,although their hot radiator grills are bright. Only the steel in reinforced concrete shows up, so buildings lookmore like cages of copper pipes and electricity cables than homes and offices. There is little privacy in theworld revealed by the millimetre-wave camera. Sitting rooms, bedrooms, bathrooms and lavatories allmerge into one open space. People sit in their cages watching warm boxes, others sleep while suspendeda few centimetres above the floor.........It is a world where there will be nowhere to hide, nor anywhere to hide anything. There are already devicesunder development that will see through walls and strip-search suspects from a distance, looking under their clothes and inside their bodies.Millimetre waves sit in the electromagnetic spectrum between the infrared and microwaves. They areemitted by anything that contains water, especially if it is warm. The human body is an excellent source, andit stands out like a beacon at these frequencies."The above information has proven that in 1997, civilians scientist already can use the millimeter wavescamera to spy on people from a distance when people are at home or building.
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That's because the millimeter wave will be emitted from human body and it can pass through all materials obuilding (such as metal, wood, etc.). Therefore, by using the millimeter wave camera, the operators can spyon the targets through wall, metal, etc.How can this kind of camera be used to spy or search people? According the report, it state that the millimeter wave can be used to find the target (even distinguishingmale or female) and everything outside the human body (in pockets). This camera even can locate a man'sgenital. The only limitation is that it cannot to check the inside (such as organs) of human body. Therefore,the microwave imaging device will be used to look inside the body.Let's review the important information below:"While millimetre-wave cameras ruffle through pockets and clothes, microwave imaging devices will lookinside the human body for contraband hidden in even more intimate places (see "The Pocket Radar Revolution, "New Scientist", 12 August). Developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory inCalifornia, these devices comprise two tiny radars that broadcast microwave impulses and listen for thereflections. Each radar controls its range by briefly opening its "ears" a short time after each pulse isbroadcast, ignoring echoes from nearer or more distant objects. This effectively creates a shell around theradar, which typically has a radius of a few metros. By using two radars with shells that overlap, and varyingthe size of each shell, it is possible to map an entire volume of space. Such devices have enormouspotential for surveillance. They could make strip-searches a thing of the past, for example. To a trainedoperator, foreign objects inside the body will show up as easily as those outside. And because microwavespass easily through walls and doors, similar systems could be used to mount a discreet surveillanceoperation. The radar set should cost only a few dollars to assemble. It is already little bigger than a bar of soap, and could be made much smaller. Only the computing power to assemble the image will be expensiveand bulky."Now let's compare with current mind control surveillance system with this technology.I would remind you the cases which was reported in "Microwave Harassment & Mind ControlExperimentation" by Julienne McKinney to explain it.(attachment)One individual (driven to extremes of stress by ongoing electronic harassment focusing on her children)killed one child in an effort to protect her from further pain. Another individual, during a telephone conversation, was told by an employee of a local power company that, if she value the lives of her children, she would drop the her opposition to the company's installation of highpower lines. Since receiving that threat, the individual 11-year-old daughter has been reduced to extremes of pain, resulting in her recurrent hospitalization for treatment of illness which cannot be diagnosed. It's nowalso apparent to this individual that her three-year-old son is on the receiving end of externally inducedauditory input.I would like to emphasize some important point for those readers who think that the above examples areunusual cases and other people would not be subjected to similar harassment.The two families in this example are average law abiding citizens and living in their own home. Even under such kind circumstances, these members of these two families cannot avoid of being spied on. So, thechildren of these two families cannot avoid being attacked and harm by remotely controlled invisible waveweapons (even in the security of their own home or staying at hospitals).It proves the invisible wave weapon has been used in conjunction with the surveillance system. Also, bothsystems can track or attack any of the member of these two families with incredible accuracy. From thesecases, we know that anyone of us can be also injured or examined in our own home or public building(including car, boat, plane etc.-- That's because the original surveillance program in 1971 was designed to"wire" every home, car, boat, etc.--see detail on _UNCLOAKING THE CIA_ published by Free Press 1978).The above information (two cases) also proves that no place is safe for anyone when you live under the mindcontrol surveillance system (Include the invisible wave weapon & mind control surveillance system).Some female victims had reported that they were attack in the urethra region at home. According to aboveinformation, I deduce that they are telling truth. These information prove that the state of art of technologies of mind control should have involved the corrupted officers. That's how they have access to such incredibletechnologies (targeting). Also that's why the local law enforcement unit can be the basic unit of mind control.Comparing with the above civilian scientist' device millimeter waves camera, I deduce that mind controlsurveillance system has used the technology of millimeter wave and microwave imaging device tosurveillance people for a long time. Furthermore, the corrupted operators can use the microwave to checkhuman inside organs in order to manipulate people's lives. That's because the secret research of mindcontrol is far beyond the civilians scientific research. The millimeter wave and microwave imaging device
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