Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Buy Now $109.99
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword or section
Like this
29Activity

Table Of Contents

1.0 Environmental Law as a System
2.0 Defining the Subject Matter: What Is Environmental Law?
2.1 How a Federal or State Environmental Law Is Adopted3
2.2 How Environmental Regulations Are Issued4
3.0 Laws That Establish Compliance Obligations
3.1 Major Environmental Laws
3.3 State Laws Independent of the Federal Requirements
3.5 Business Regulatory Laws
3.6 Local and Municipal Laws
3.7 Environmental Law and Judicial Decisions
3.8 Common Law
4.0 Common Law Environmental Requirements: Torts
4.3 Negligence
4.4 Strict Liability and Dangerous Substances
5.0 Laws That Enforce Permits, Prohibitions, and Penalties
5.3 General Purpose Criminal Laws
6.0 Laws That Define the Environmental Law Framework
6.1 The Organic Laws: Constitutions and Charters
6.2 The Courts’ Role
6.3 Defining the Limits of Governmental Authority
6.4 Administrative Law and Procedure
6.5 Rules of Evidence
7.0 Joint and Several Liability, Indemnity, and Contribution
8.0 Environmental Compliance Principles
9.0 Importance of Knowledge of Environmental Law
10.0 Research Sources
2.0 Enforcement Trends
2.1 Remedy Preferences
2.2 Statute-by-Statute Enforcement
2.3 The Corporate Environmental Endangerment Initiative
3.0 General Concepts of Enforcement and Liability
3.1 Enforcement Purposes
3.2 Applicable Law
3.3 Compliance Monitoring
3.4 Enforcement Remedies
3.5 Enforcement Authority
4.0 Civil Enforcement and Liability
4.2 Statute-Specific Principles of Liability and Defense
4.3 Statutory Standard of Conduct
4.4 Statutory Defenses
4.5 Agreed-Upon Principles of Enforcement and Defense
4.6 Agency Principles and Policies
4.7 Progression of a Civil Enforcement Proceeding
5.0 Private Civil Enforcement by Citizen Suits
6.0 Criminal Enforcement and Liability
6.1 Approaches and Defenses to Criminal Liability
6.2 Agency Principles and Policies
6.3 Progression of an Enforcement Proceeding
7.1 Corporate Systems for Environmental Assessment
7.2 Corporate Systems for Environmental Management
7.3 Corporate Transactions
8.0 New Trends in Enforcement and Liability
8.1 SEC Compliance and Investor Relations
8.2 Financial Accounting Standards
8.3 Natural Resource Damages
8.4 New Source Review
8.5 State Attorneys General
9.0 Final Thoughts
9.1 Cyclical Environmental Law
9.2 Science Matters
9.3 Technology Brings Its Own Headaches
9.4 Agency Discretion
9.5 Cross-Border Issues
2.0 Policy Goals and Objectives of RCRA
3.0 Definition of Solid and Hazardous Waste
4.0 Subtitle C: Hazardous Waste Management Program
4.1 Identification of Hazardous Wastes11
4.2 Notification of Hazardous Waste Management Activities
4.3 Generators of Hazardous Waste
4.4 Transporters of Hazardous Wastes
4.5 Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) Facilities
4.7 State Hazardous Waste Programs
4.8 Inspection
4.9 Civil and Criminal Enforcement Actions
4.11 Imminent Hazard Actions
4.12 Enforcement and Compliance History Online
5.0 State Solid Waste Programs under Subtitle D
6.0 Federal Facility Compliance
6.1 Waiver of Sovereign Immunity
6.2 Federal Employee Protection and Exposure
6.3 EPA Administrative Orders
6.4 EPA Annual Inspections of Federal Facilities
6.5 Public Vessel Exemption
6.6 Unserviceable Munitions
7.0 Other Federal Responsibilities
9.0 Conclusion
1.1 Objectives of the UST Program
2.0 Basic Terminology
2.1 Underground Storage Tank Systems
2.2 Regulated Substances
2.3 Owners and Operators
3.0 Implementation and Enforcement
3.1 Implementation
4.0 Summary of Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements
4.1 Reporting Requirements
4.2 Recordkeeping Requirements
5.0 New UST Systems
5.1 Notification Requirements
5.2 Performance Standards
6.0 Existing UST Systems
6.1 Notification Requirements
6.2 Upgrading of Existing UST Systems
6.3 Enforcement of Upgrade Requirements
7.0 General Operating Requirements
7.1 Spill and Overfill Control
7.3 Substance Compatibility
7.4 UST System Repairs
9.0 Release Detection
9.1 General Requirements and Schedule
9.2 Methods of Release Detection for Tanks and Piping
9.3 Specific Requirements for Petroleum USTs
10.0 Release Reporting, Investigation, and Response
10.2 Reporting of Suspected Releases
10.3 Release Investigation and Confirmation
10.4 Initial Release Response
10.5 Initial Abatement Measures
10.6 Initial Site Characterization
10.7 Free Product Removal
10.8 Investigations for Soil and Groundwater Cleanup
10.9 Reporting and Cleanup of Spills and Overfills
10.10 Corrective Action Plan
10.11 Evolving Approach to Petroleum UST Cleanups
11.0 Closure of UST Systems
11.1 Temporary Closure
11.2 Permanent Closure/Change-in-Service
12.0 Financial Responsibility Requirements
12.1 Applicability and Compliance Dates
12.2 Amount and Scope of Financial Responsibility Required
12.3 Allowable Financial Responsibility Mechanisms
12.4 Available State UST Cleanup Funds
12.5 Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements
14.0 Research Sources
2.0 CAA Regulatory Programs
2.1 Air Quality Regulation
2.2 New Source Control Programs
2.3 Specific Pollution Problems
2.4 Operating Permit Program
3.0 Enforcement of the CAA
3.1 Civil Enforcement
3.2 Criminal Penalties
3.3 Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
3.4 Compliance Audits
3.5 Enforcement Initiatives
4.0 Legislative Proposals
4.1 CAA Reauthorization
4.2 Climate Change
5.0 Conclusion
6.0 Research Sources
2.0 Brief History of the CWA
3.0 Clean Water Act Goals and Policies
4.0 Elements of the CWA
5.0 The Discharge Prohibition
5.2 Pollutant
5.4 Navigable Waters (“Waters of the United States”)
6.0 The NPDES Permit Program
6.1 What Is an NPDES Permit?
6.2 What Discharges Require an NPDES Permit?
6.3 State and Federal Roles
6.4 The Permit Process
6.5 NPDES Permit Conditions
6.6 Monitoring Requirements
6.7 Effluent Limitations
6.8 Storm-Water Discharges
6.9 Combined Sewer Overflows and Sanitary Sewer Overflows
6.10 Thermal Discharges
6.11 Ocean Discharges
7.0 The Pretreatment Program
7.1 General Prohibitions
7.2 Specific Prohibitions
7.3 National Categorical Standards
7.4 Removal Credits
7.6 Pretreatment Program Enforcement
8.0 Nonpoint-Source Discharges
8.1 The Section 319 Program
8.2 Coastal Zone Management Program
8.3 National Estuary Program
9.0 Dredge and Fill Permits
9.1 Waters within the Scope of the Program
9.2 Covered Activities
9.3 Individual Permits
9.4 The Mitigation Policy
9.5 Nationwide Permits
9.6 Potential Liabilities under the Section 404 Program
10.0 Preventing, Reporting, and Responding to Spills
10.1 Spill Prevention
10.2 Spill Notification
10.3 Spill Response and Liability
11.1 Federal and State Roles
11.2 Enforcement Theories
11.4 Enforcement Options
11.5 Administrative Order
11.6 Civil Judicial Enforcement
11.7 Criminal Enforcement
12.0 Research Sources
2.0 Background
3.0 Title I: Oil Pollution Liability and Compensation
4.0 Elements of Liability
4.1 Standard of Liability
4.2 Removal Costs and Spill Response
4.3 Compensatory Damages
5.0 Natural Resource Damages
5.1 NRDA Regulations
5.2 Application of NRDA Regulations
6.0 Defenses to Liability
6.1 Third-Party Liability
7.0 Limits on Liability
7.1 Standard for Limiting OPA Liability
7.2 Specific Liability Limits
7.3 Adjustment of Liability Limits
8.0 Recovery by a Foreign Claimant
9.0 Recovery by a Responsible Party
10.0 Contribution and Indemnification
11.0 Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund
11.1 Principal Sections
11.2 Preservation of State Funds
11.3 Funding of the Fund
11.4 Uses of the Fund
12.1 Designation of the Source and Advertisement
13.0 Financial Responsibility
13.1 Calculation of Financial Responsibility Amounts
13.2 Methods of Demonstrating Financial Responsibility
13.3 Role of the Guarantor
13.5 Financial Responsibility Regulations for Vessels
13.6 Financial Responsibility for Facilities
15.0 Litigation and Jurisdiction
16.0 Relationship to Other Laws
16.1 Preservation of State Oil Spill Liability Law
16.2 Preservation of Federal Laws
16.3 Federal Preemption under the Locke Case
17.0 Title II: Conforming Amendments
18.0 Title III: International Oil Pollution Prevention and Removal
19.0 Title IV: Prevention and Removal
20.0 Subtitle A: Prevention
20.1 Licensing Requirements and Drug and Alcohol Testing
20.2 Foreign Tank Vessel Manning Standards
20.3 Tank Vessel Manning
20.4 Marine Casualty Reporting
20.5 Pilotage and Tug Escort Requirements
20.6 Studies and Regulations (Sections 4107–4113)
20.7 Double-Hull Requirements for Tank Vessels
21.0 Subtitle B: Removal
21.1 Federal Removal Authority
21.2 State and Local Removal Authority
21.3 Responder Immunity
21.4 National Planning and Response System
21.5 Vessel and Facility Response Plans
22.0 Subtitle C: Penalties
22.1 CWA Criminal Penalties
23.0 Title VII: Research and Development Program
24.0 Research Sources
2.0 Background to U.S. Drinking Water Regulation
2.1 Drinking Water Regulation before the SDWA
2.2 The 1974 Safe Drinking Water Act
2.3 The 1986 Amendments to the SDWA
2.4 The 1996 Amendments to the SDWA
The 1996 amendments to the SDWA9
2.5 2002 Bioterrorism Act
3.0 The SDWA Regulatory Scheme
3.1 Federal/State Relationship
3.2 Primary and Secondary Standards
3.3 Who Is Regulated—Public Water Systems
3.4 Classification of Public Water Systems
4.0 How Drinking Water Is Regulated—Standard Setting
4.2 NPDWR Standard Setting—MCLs and MCLGs
4.4 Treatment Techniques
4.5 Periodic Review of Existing NPDWRs
4.6 Judicial Review
5.1 Surface Water Treatment Rule
5.2 The Total Coliform Rule
5.3 Disinfection and Disinfection By-products Rule
5.4 Lead and Copper Rule
5.5 Inorganic Contaminants
5.6 Synthetic Organic Contaminants
5.7 Volatile Organic Compounds
5.8 Radionuclides
5.9 Filter Backwash Recycling Rule
6.0 Regulatory Compliance Requirements
6.1 Monitoring/Sampling
6.2 Reporting
6.3 Violations
6.4 Public Notification
6.5 Recordkeeping
6.6 Public Access
6.7 Consumer Confidence Reports
6.8 Guidance Documents
6.9 Operator Certification Guidance and Grants
6.10 Variances and Exemptions
7.0 Enforcement
7.1 EPA Enforcement
7.2 Fines, Penalties, and Injunctive Relief
7.3 State Primacy Authorities Related to Enforcement
7.4 Citizen Suits
8.0 Private Tort and Nuisance Actions
9.0 Preemption
10.2 Drinking Water Used as a Food Ingredient
11.1 Homeland Security Presidential Directives
11.2 Security Enhancements, Research, and Technology
12.0 Funding and Grant Programs
13.0 International Regulation
14.0 Underground Injection Program
14.2 Carbon Sequestration
15.0 Hydraulic Fracturing
16.0 Source Water Protection
17.0 Research Sources
1.1 CERCLA’s History and Objectives
1.2 Overview of CERCLA’s Provisions
1.3 The Superfund
1.4 Sources of CERCLA Law
2.0 Important CERCLA Terms
2.1 Hazardous Substance and Pollutant or Contaminant
2.2 Release or Threat of Release
2.3 Facility or Vessel
2.5 National Priorities List
2.6 National Contingency Plan
3.0 CERCLA’s Remedial Provisions
3.1 EPA’s Authority to Act
3.2 Categories of Response Actions
3.3 Steps in the Remedial Process
4.0 CERCLA’s Liability Provisions
4.2 CERCLA’s Operative Concepts
4.3 EPA’s Enforcement Policy
4.4 Identifying Responsible Parties
4.5 Response Cost Recovery Actions
4.6 CERCLA Section 106 Abatement Actions
4.7 CERCLA Section 106 Administrative Orders
4.8 Defenses to Liability
4.9 Citizen Suit Provisions
4.10 Natural Resources Damages
4.11 Contribution Actions
5.0 Settlements with EPA
5.2 Controlling Authority
5.3 Consent Decrees and Consent Orders
5.4 Major Settlement Issues
6.0 Release Reporting Requirements
7.0 Federal Facilities
8.0 Superfund’s Future
9.0 Research Sources
2.0 NEPA’s Development
2.1 Legislative History
2.2 Policy and Goals
2.3 Council on Environmental Quality
3.0 Requirements for Federal Agencies
3.1 CEQ Regulations
3.2 Relationship to Other Federal Laws
3.3 Functional Equivalency
4.0 Strategic Approaches to NEPA Compliance
4.1 Nonmajor Actions (Categorical Exclusions)
4.2 Formulating the Proposal
4.3 Purpose and Need
4.4 Integrating Long-Range Planning and NEPA
4.6 Environmental Assessments
5.0 EIS Preparation
5.2 Scoping and Early Coordination
5.3 Use of the EA and Applicant’s Information
5.4 Delegation
5.5 Content of EIS
5.6 Commenting and Public Involvement
5.7 Mitigation of Impacts
5.8 Proposals for Legislation
5.9 Cumulative Effects
6.0 NEPA’s Extraterritorial Application
7.0 Environmental Justice
8.0 EPA Review and Comment
9.0 Judicial Review of NEPA
10.0 CEQ Study of NEPA’s Effectiveness
12.0 Adaptive Management
13.0 NEPA and Transportation
13.1 Participating Agencies
13.2 Coordination Plan Required
13.3 Purpose and Need Statement
13.4 Environmental Review Process
13.5 Statute of Limitations on Challenges
13.6 Delegation of Categorical Exclusions
14.0 Proposed CEQ Guidance
14.1 Establishing Categorical Exclusions
14.3 NEPA Mitigation and Monitoring
16.0 Research Sources
2.0 Governing Law
2.1 The Obama Administration and the U.S. Congress
2.2 Air Emissions Law
2.4 Species Protection Law
2.5 Environmental Impact Assessment Law
2.6 State and Regional Climate Change Regimes
2.7 Corporate Securities Law
3.0 Practical Considerations
3.1 Permitting
3.2 Emissions Trading
3.3 Corporate Transactions
3.4 Corporate Governance
4.0 Conclusion
2.0 Activities Subject to TSCA
2.4 Distribute
3.0 The TSCA Inventory
3.1 Initial Compilation of the Inventory
3.2 Inventory Corrections
3.3 Maintaining and Updating the Inventory Database
3.4 Proposed Amendments
3.5 How to Use the Inventory
4.0 New Chemical Review
4.1 PMN Requirements
4.2 Exclusions from PMN Requirements
4.3 Exemptions from PMN Requirements
4.4 Nanotechnology
5.0 Preparing the PMN and Seeing It through EPA
5.1 Manufacturer’s PMN Selection Strategy
12.0 TSCA Inspections and Enforcement
12.3 Settlement Procedures
12.4 Administrative Hearings
12.5 Criminal Liability
12.6 Citizen Actions and Petitions
13.1 Import Regulation: TSCA § 13
13.2 Export Regulation: TSCA § 12
14.1 Recent Reform Models
14.2 Prospects of Passage
15.0 Research Sources
1.0 Background to the Federal Regulation of Pesticides
1.2 Early Efforts at Pesticide Regulations
2.0 Overview of FIFRA and Amendments
2.1 Organization of the Pesticide Program within EPA
2.2 Background to FIFRA and the 1972 FEPCA
2.3 Subsequent FIFRA Amendments: An Overview
3.0 Pesticide Registration
3.1 Definition of Pesticides, Pests, and Devices
3.2 Pesticide Registration Procedures
3.3 Conditional Registration
3.4 Streamlining of Reregistration
3.5 Registration of “Me-Too” Pesticides
3.6 Registration Fees
3.7 Categorical Pesticide Review
3.9 Modifications and Transfers of Registrations
3.11 “Featherbedding” or “Me-Too” Registrants
3.12 Essentiality in Registration
4.0 Control over Pesticide Usage
4.2 Self-Certification of Private Applicators
4.3 Experimental Use Permits
4.4 Two-House Congressional Veto over EPA Regulations
5.0 Removal of Pesticides from the Market
5.2 Suspension
5.3 Misbranding and Stop-Sale Orders
5.4 International Effect of EPA Cancellations
5.5 Disposal and Recall
5.6 Compensation for Canceled Pesticides
5.7 Balancing Test in FIFRA
5.8 Requirements of Consultation by EPA with USDA
5.9 Economic Impact on Agriculture Statement
5.10 Scientific Advisory Committees
6.0 Administrative and Judicial Review
6.1 Scope of the Administrator’s Flexibility
6.2 Standing for Registration, Appeals, and Subpoenas
6.3 Judicial Appeals
6.4 The Role of Public Hearings
7.0 Role of States and Localities
7.1 Intrastate Registrations
7.2 Greater State Authority
7.3 Federal Preemption and State Authority
8.0 Litigation Issues
8.2 Labels in Theory and Practice
8.3 Fraudulent Registrations
8.4 Coming Litigation
10.0 Amendments to FIFRA
10.1 Need for FIFRA Renewal
10.2 Hogtie the EPA: 1975 Amendments to FIFRA
10.4 Two-House Veto: 1980 Amendments to FIFRA
10.5 FIFRA Lite: 1988 Amendments to FIFRA
10.6 Minor Pesticide Uses: 1990 Amendments to FIFRA
10.7 Bye-Bye Delaney: 1996 Amendments to FIFRA
10.8 Fees and Timetables: 2003 PRIA Amendments to FIFRA
11.0 Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA) of 1996
11.1 Regulatory Dilemma under the Delaney Clause
11.2 Demise of Delaney
11.3 Public Health Pesticides
11.4 Infants and Children
11.6 Other Provisions of FQPA
12.0 Pesticide Regulation under Other Federal Statutes
12.1 Pesticides under FDCA
12.2 Clean Air Act of 1970 and Its Progeny
12.3 Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972
12.4 Solid Waste Disposal Acts
12.5 Occupational Safety and Health Act
12.6 Federal Hazardous Substances Act
12.7 Federal Pesticide Monitoring Programs
12.8 National Environmental Policy Act
13.1 The Promise and Fear of Biotechnology
13.2 The Initial Controversy over Regulating Biotechnology
13.3 “Frankenfood” Enforcement
2.0 Federal Pollution Prevention Strategy
2.1 Background
2.0 Legislative Framework
2.1 Purpose of the Act
2.2 Coverage of the Act
2.3 Exemptions from the Act
2.4 Mine Safety and Health Administration
2.5 Telecommuting and Home Workplaces
3.0 Scope of OSHA Standards
3.1 Areas Covered by the OSHA Standards
3.2 Overview of Standards
3.3 Overview of Health Standards
3.4 Overview of Safety Standards
4.0 Standard Setting
4.1 Consensus Standards: Section 6(a)
4.2 Standards Completion and Deletion Processes
4.3 Permanent Standards: Section 6(b)
4.4 Emergency Temporary Standards
4.5 General Duty Clause, 5(a)(1)
4.6 Feasibility and the Balancing Debate
4.7 Struggling for Standards: Popcorn Lungs and Cranes
5.0 Variances
5.1 Temporary Variances
5.2 Permanent Variances
6.0 Compliance and Inspections
6.1 Field Structure
6.2 Role of Inspections
6.3 Training and Competence of Inspectors
6.4 Citations, Fines, and Penalties
6.5 OSHA Citation and Penalty Patterns
6.6 Communicating and Enforcing Company Rules
6.7 Warrantless Inspections: The Barlow Case
7.0 Recordkeeping
7.1 Accident Reports
7.2 Monitoring and Medical Records
7.3 Hazard Communication
7.4 Access to Records
7.5 Programmatic Standards
8.0 Refusal to Work and Whistle-Blowing
8.1 Refusal to Work
8.2 Protection of Whistle-Blowing
9.0 Federal and State Employees
9.1 Federal Agencies
9.2 State Employees
10.0 State OSHA Programs
12.0 Overlapping Jurisdiction
13.1 OSHRC Appeal Process
13.2 Limitations of the Commission
15.0 Hazard Communication Regulation
15.1 Reason for the Regulation
15.2 Scope and Components
15.3 Hazard Evaluation
15.5 Federal Preemption Controversy
16.0 Ergonomics Issues
16.2 Scope of the Problem
16.3 Scope of the Standard
2.0 Legal Relevance of Environmental Management Systems
2.2 EMSs, Enforcement Discretion, and Penalty Mitigation
2.3 EMS and Regulatory Initiatives
2.4 The Broader Context
2.5 International Considerations
3.0 Environmental Management Systems
Index
P. 1
Environmental Law Handbook

Environmental Law Handbook

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1,258|Likes:
Published by RowmanLittlefield

The environmental field and its regulations have evolved significantly since Congress passed the first environmental law in 1970, and the Environmental Law Handbook, published just three years later, has been indispensable to students and professionals ever since. The authors provide clear and accessible explanations, expert legal insight into new and evolving regulations, and reliable compliance and management guidance.

The Environmental Law Handbook continues to provide individuals across the country-professionals, professors, and students-with a comprehensive, up-to-date, and easy-to-read look at the major environmental, health, and safety laws affecting U.S. businesses and organizations. Because it is written by the country's leading environmental law firms, you receive the best, most reliable guidance anywhere.

Both professional environmental managers and students aspiring to careers in environmental management should keep the Environmental Law Handbook within arm's reach for thoughtful answers to regulatory questions like:

- How do I ensure compliance with the regulations?
- How do the latest environmental developments impact my operations?
- How do we keep our operations efficient and our community safe?

This handbook begins with chapters on the fundamentals of environmental law and on issues of enforcement and liability. It then dives headfirst into the major laws, examining their history, scope, and requirements with a chapter devoted to each.

The 21st edition of this well-known handbook has been thoroughly updated, with major changes to chapters on the Clean Air Act and the Oil Pollution Act, and a rewritten chapter on the Safe Drinking Water Act. This edition also includes a brand new chapter on Climate Change and Environmental Law. This is an essential reference for environmental students and professionals, and anyone who wants the most up-to-date information available on environmental laws.

The environmental field and its regulations have evolved significantly since Congress passed the first environmental law in 1970, and the Environmental Law Handbook, published just three years later, has been indispensable to students and professionals ever since. The authors provide clear and accessible explanations, expert legal insight into new and evolving regulations, and reliable compliance and management guidance.

The Environmental Law Handbook continues to provide individuals across the country-professionals, professors, and students-with a comprehensive, up-to-date, and easy-to-read look at the major environmental, health, and safety laws affecting U.S. businesses and organizations. Because it is written by the country's leading environmental law firms, you receive the best, most reliable guidance anywhere.

Both professional environmental managers and students aspiring to careers in environmental management should keep the Environmental Law Handbook within arm's reach for thoughtful answers to regulatory questions like:

- How do I ensure compliance with the regulations?
- How do the latest environmental developments impact my operations?
- How do we keep our operations efficient and our community safe?

This handbook begins with chapters on the fundamentals of environmental law and on issues of enforcement and liability. It then dives headfirst into the major laws, examining their history, scope, and requirements with a chapter devoted to each.

The 21st edition of this well-known handbook has been thoroughly updated, with major changes to chapters on the Clean Air Act and the Oil Pollution Act, and a rewritten chapter on the Safe Drinking Water Act. This edition also includes a brand new chapter on Climate Change and Environmental Law. This is an essential reference for environmental students and professionals, and anyone who wants the most up-to-date information available on environmental laws.

More info:

Publish date: 2011
Added to Scribd: Feb 07, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9781605907260
List Price: $109.99 Buy Now

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Buy the full version from:Amazon
See more
See less

06/24/2015

1085

9781605907260

$109.99

USD

You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 44 to 785 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 829 to 911 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 979 to 1039 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 1083 to 1085 are not shown in this preview.

Activity (29)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
ksbbs liked this
UnderstandableMe liked this
muazeemK liked this
Fatah Soomro liked this
Son Hoang Dinh liked this
antonija86 liked this
Adjust Firdaus liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->