Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Buy Now $23.99
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
3Activity

Table Of Contents

INFANTICIDE IN WORLD HISTORY
INFANTICIDE IN CHINA
ASUBJECT OR ASENSIBILITY?
CAUSES AND FORMS OF INFANTICIDE
Female Infanticide in Nineteenth-Century China
BUDDHISM AND DAOISM IN POPULAR MORALITY LITERATURE
CONFUCIANISM IN POPULAR MORALITY LITERATURE
POPULAR BROADSHEETS AND NEWSPAPERS
EARLY OFFICIALEFFORTS TO COMBAT INFANTICIDE
Official and Literati Efforts to Combat Infanticide
EARLY QING LITERATI EFFORTS TO ASSIST ABANDONED CHILDREN
LITERATI FOUNDLING HOSPICES
CONFUCIAN ARGUMENTS AGAINST FEMALE INFANTICIDE
NINETEENTH-CENTURY INFANT PROTECTION SOCIETIES
DENIALIN HISTORY
Infanticide Deniers
PROTESTANT MISSIONARY INFANTICIDE DENIERS
KNOWLEDGEABLE PROTESTANT MISSIONARY OBSERVERS
INFANTICIDE DENIERS IN EUROPE
The European Cult of Chinese Children
THE HOLY CHILDHOOD AND THE CULT OF THE CHILD
CREATING AFOREIGN ISLAND IN CHINA
THE JESUIT RESPONSE TO INFANTICIDE DENIERS
Female Infanticide in Modern China
Conclusion
Bibliography
Notes
Index
About the Author
P. 1
Drowning Girls in China: Female Infanticide in China since 1650

Drowning Girls in China: Female Infanticide in China since 1650

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1,447|Likes:
Published by RowmanLittlefield
This groundbreaking book offers the first full analysis of the long-neglected and controversial subject of female infanticide in China. Although infanticide and child abandonment were worldwide phenomena from antiquity down to the nineteenth century when massive numbers of children were still being abandoned in Europe, China was unique in targeting girls almost exclusively. Yet despite its persistence for two thousand years, little has been published on a practice that is deeply sensitive within China and little understood by outsiders.

Drawing on little-known Chinese documents and illustrations, noted historian D. E. Mungello describes the causes and continuation of female infanticide since 1650 despite efforts by Confucian moralists, Buddhist teachings, government officials, and even imperial edicts to stop the practice. The arrival of Christian missionaries led to foreign involvement as well, with Catholic priests baptizing abandoned and dying infants in Nanjing and Beijing beginning in the early 1600s. Mission efforts peaked in the nineteenth century when the European-based Society of the Holy Childhood urged Catholic children to contribute their pennies to help neglected children in China. However, most of the infant victims were drowned at birth in the privacy of their homes, thereby escaping the scrutiny of the law and the public.

Mungello brings this secretive practice to light with a nuanced and balanced analysis of the cultural, economic, and social causes of early infanticide and its contemporary manifestation in sex-selected abortion as a result of the government's one-child policy. Presenting female infanticide as a human rather than a distinctly Chinese problem, he estimates the tragic loss of girls in the millions.
This groundbreaking book offers the first full analysis of the long-neglected and controversial subject of female infanticide in China. Although infanticide and child abandonment were worldwide phenomena from antiquity down to the nineteenth century when massive numbers of children were still being abandoned in Europe, China was unique in targeting girls almost exclusively. Yet despite its persistence for two thousand years, little has been published on a practice that is deeply sensitive within China and little understood by outsiders.

Drawing on little-known Chinese documents and illustrations, noted historian D. E. Mungello describes the causes and continuation of female infanticide since 1650 despite efforts by Confucian moralists, Buddhist teachings, government officials, and even imperial edicts to stop the practice. The arrival of Christian missionaries led to foreign involvement as well, with Catholic priests baptizing abandoned and dying infants in Nanjing and Beijing beginning in the early 1600s. Mission efforts peaked in the nineteenth century when the European-based Society of the Holy Childhood urged Catholic children to contribute their pennies to help neglected children in China. However, most of the infant victims were drowned at birth in the privacy of their homes, thereby escaping the scrutiny of the law and the public.

Mungello brings this secretive practice to light with a nuanced and balanced analysis of the cultural, economic, and social causes of early infanticide and its contemporary manifestation in sex-selected abortion as a result of the government's one-child policy. Presenting female infanticide as a human rather than a distinctly Chinese problem, he estimates the tragic loss of girls in the millions.

More info:

Publish date: 2008
Added to Scribd: Feb 07, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780742557321
List Price: $23.99 Buy Now

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
See more
See less

07/16/2014

186

9780742557321

$23.99

USD

You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 8 to 37 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 45 to 114 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 128 to 131 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 139 to 186 are not shown in this preview.

Activity (3)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
nmrs liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->