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Table Of Contents

Hinayana and Mahayana
Practicing the Paramitas
Self-Attachment
Death
Generosity with Characteristics
Generosity with Characteristics and Intention
The Sickness of Poverty
Giving Without Characteristics
The Gift of Wealth
The Gift of the Dharma
The Gift of Fearlessness
The Buddhist Precepts
Three Kinds of Patience
Patience with Those Who Would Harm Us
Patience with Regard to the Environment
Patient Endurance of Dharmas
Contemplating Emptiness
Worldly and World-Transcending Patience
Vows and Aspirations
Diligence that is like Armor
Virtuous Diligence
Compassionate Diligence
Practicing the Three Types of Diligence
First Dhyana Level
Second Dhyana Level
Third Dhyana Level
The Seven Expedient Means
Basics Aspects of Dhyana Practice
The Fourth Dhyana Level
Fifth Dhyana Level
Ways of Looking at Prajna
General Prajna and Specific Prajna
Suchness Prajna and Illumination Prajna
Worldly Prajna and Non-Worldly Prajna
Three Kinds of Prajna
Five Kinds of Prajna
Methods of Practicing Prajna
Subjective and Objective Contemplation
Direct Contemplation
Absolute Contemplation
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The Six Paramitas - The Bodhisattva Perfections -

The Six Paramitas - The Bodhisattva Perfections -

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Published by lambda8
In Buddhism, the pāramitās refer to the perfection or culmination of certain virtues. In Buddhism, these virtues are cultivated as a way of purification, purifying karma and helping the aspirant to live an unobstructed life, while reaching the goal of enlightenment.
It should be noted that in established Theravāda tradition the pāramīs are not regarded as a discipline peculiar to candidates for Buddhahood alone but as practices which must be fulfilled by all aspirants to enlightenment and deliverance, whether as Buddhas, paccekabuddhas, or disciples. What distinguishes the supreme bodhisattva from aspirants in the other two vehicles is the degree to which the pāramīs must be cultivated and the length of time they must be pursued. But the qualities themselves are universal requisites for deliverance, which all must fulfill to at least a minimal degree to merit the fruits of the liberating path.
(Wikipedia 2013)
In Buddhism, the pāramitās refer to the perfection or culmination of certain virtues. In Buddhism, these virtues are cultivated as a way of purification, purifying karma and helping the aspirant to live an unobstructed life, while reaching the goal of enlightenment.
It should be noted that in established Theravāda tradition the pāramīs are not regarded as a discipline peculiar to candidates for Buddhahood alone but as practices which must be fulfilled by all aspirants to enlightenment and deliverance, whether as Buddhas, paccekabuddhas, or disciples. What distinguishes the supreme bodhisattva from aspirants in the other two vehicles is the degree to which the pāramīs must be cultivated and the length of time they must be pursued. But the qualities themselves are universal requisites for deliverance, which all must fulfill to at least a minimal degree to merit the fruits of the liberating path.
(Wikipedia 2013)

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Published by: lambda8 on Feb 07, 2012
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03/18/2013

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