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Course Assignment Romain Vuattoux

Course Assignment Romain Vuattoux

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Published by Tim Nabholz
In this paper the author puts in perspective the size and scale of the challenges Shanghai is starting to face with its aging population, and demonstrates that it is an unprecedented phenomenon in terms of speed and scale for a developing country. The paper looks at mobility and differentiates the term from just transport to include the concept of accessibility. This paper looks at how Shanghai can improve mobility and accessibility for its transport with a focus on the physical challenges in planning that need to be considered for elderly. Barriers to both mobility and accessibility are identified. Results show that both an interdisciplinary approach and good land use planning must combine to break these barriers.

Since this paper was written, it has come to the author's attention that the WHO published a report on Age friendly cities which adds to the analysis of this paper. This report available at:

http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2007/9789241547307_eng.pdf
In this paper the author puts in perspective the size and scale of the challenges Shanghai is starting to face with its aging population, and demonstrates that it is an unprecedented phenomenon in terms of speed and scale for a developing country. The paper looks at mobility and differentiates the term from just transport to include the concept of accessibility. This paper looks at how Shanghai can improve mobility and accessibility for its transport with a focus on the physical challenges in planning that need to be considered for elderly. Barriers to both mobility and accessibility are identified. Results show that both an interdisciplinary approach and good land use planning must combine to break these barriers.

Since this paper was written, it has come to the author's attention that the WHO published a report on Age friendly cities which adds to the analysis of this paper. This report available at:

http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2007/9789241547307_eng.pdf

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: Tim Nabholz on Feb 09, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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03/04/2012

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Student: Romain VUATTOUX
 
Tutor: Dr. Peter Parker
Sustainable Urban Development BY604E 30 credits:Course Assignment
 
Thinking beyond mobility, bringing accessibility totransportation planning for a rapidly aging population inShanghai
 
Malmo University
 
Autumn 2011
 
Sustainable Urban Management Programme
 
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ABSTRACT:
 
This paper puts in perspective the size and scale of the challenges Shanghai is starting to face with itsaging population, and demonstrates that it is an unprecedented phenomenon in terms of speed and scale for a developing country. It looks at mobility and differentiates the term from merely signifying“transport” to include the concept of accessibility. This paper looks at how Shanghai can improvemobility and accessibility for its transport with a focus on the physical challenges in planning that need to be considered for elderly. Barriers to both mobility and accessibility are identified. Results show that both an interdisciplinary approach and good land use planning must combine to break these barriers.
Keywords:
 
Shanghai, aging population, elderly, transportation, mobility and accessibility
 
NOTE:
Since this paper was written, it has come to the author’s attention that the WHOpublished a report on Age Friendly Cities which adds to the analysis of this paper. Thisreport is available via the WHO website or here:http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2007/9789241547307_eng.pdf 
 
Picture by Romain Vuattoux (August 2008)
 
 
3
INTRODUCTION:
 With a rapidly aging population, many cities around the world will have to betransformed to meet the demands of their aging inhabitants (Beard and Petitot, 2010).Sustainable urban development needs to consider everyone if it wishes to havepositive social outcomes (Dempsey et al., 2009). A growing group of the population,often not considered in developing countries, is the elderly, and this group is growingparticularly fast in Shanghai. Many aspects of the city used by the elderly will have tobe rethought, including transportation what is meant by:
mobility
. In urban planning,this term is often used as a synonym for “transportation”.
 Mobility
often considers theneed of young segments of the population as transport systems are commonly plannedto support the active population in the economy. Shanghai’s government is developingthe transportation system in view of improving
mobility
on those terms. However this
mobility
planning often lacks consideration for the ease of access to the transportationsystem, herein:
accessibility.
Questions need to be raised concerning the
accessibility
 of the transportation system for the elderly. Urban planners will need to consider
accessibility
as an integral part of 
mobility.
As China starts to face a large structuralchange in its population, and Shanghai, arguably its most modern city, is often seen asthe precursor for all changes that take place in the country, displaying trends for futurechanges and leading the way with solutions. By the 2030s, China will see itspopulation decline, and beside the country side being emptied from on-goingrural-urban migration, much of these structural changes will begin to occur in citieslike Shanghai where the majority of working immigrants will have settled and wherefertility rates have already dropped massively as people delay childbearing. The scaleand speed at which this demographic change is taking place is unprecedented inhuman history. It is a challenge to the scale of Shanghai, but which will also be facedin other rapidly developing countries. Even if changes are happening much faster thanseen before, Shanghai has the advantage of not being the first city in the world to gothrough this transition and so it can observe and learn from other cities, especially indeveloped countries where the transition started earlier. Furthermore, Shanghai is stillbenefiting from an influx of young workers from rural areas, but this will eventuallyslow down. Unless we argue for a Chinese exceptionalism where all old people wouldreturn to the country side, it is very clear that a rapidly aging population will affectShanghai and considering the size of the city, the impact of these changes will beenormous.
Problem:
Few studies have been published on the upcoming changes to the urbanpopulation structure in China. Most studies on the topic of aging demographic datesback to the 1970s and 1980s in Western countries. In China, research on the topicfocuses on the causes for the decline in children per household or the consequencesthis decline has on the economy, but aging has often been disregarded as aconsequence. Much of the research also focuses on the rural aging population, thehealth and pension implications for policy-making related to old age. Few studieslook at the consequences an aging population will have on urban development. Fewarticles have been published on how the built environment affects
mobility
and

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