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Published by Daisy

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Published by: Daisy on Nov 18, 2008
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12/01/2010

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 where its mouth is, by holding what it’s calling a“National Ad Slam” contest for the most creativeeffort to expel advertisers and commercialismfrom schools during the 2001-2002 school year.Students, teachers, parents, school boardofficials and concerned community members areencouraged to create an action plan to de-com-mercialize their school. The $5,000 first prize will be awarded directly to the school. Forschools agreeing to forgo seemingly lucrativecontracts with companies peddling soft drinks,candy and advertising, “the prize is a form of compensatory relief,” says Ruskin.Perhaps. However, the true costs of enter-ing into such agreements often go unnoticed.For example, in exchange for a $670,000 con-tract with Pepsi, Montgomery Blair HighSchool in suburban Maryland was required tobreak a state law requiring that vendingmachines be turned off during school hours.Montgomery Blair principal Phillip Gainous
By Eric Brown 
T
he average American school in 2002 hasbecome a high-tech, spiffed-up version of a Marrakesh bazaar
 you just can’t turn your head without someone trying to sell yousomething. Or sell your kids something, to be alittle more precise.Soda and candy machines in school lunch-rooms are commonplace, millions of children areforced to watch television commercials for junk food and violent Hollywood films via ChannelOne’s in-school television network, sports uni-forms are covered with logos, text books arefilled with brand names and school curriculainclude corporate-sponsored “lessons” about theenvironmental benefits of the oil industry, thetimber industry, the nuclear energy industry, andthe pesticide industry, just to name a few.So what’s a concerned citizen to do aboutprotecting children from the impact of advertis-ing and marketing in our schools? Toss out themarketers, says Gary Ruskin, executive director of the non-profit Commercial Alert. Ruskin’s groupis putting itsmoney 
No.19,SPRING 2002
$3
 A quarterly report on consumption, quality of life and the environment
Published by the Center for a New American Dream
Reading,Writing and ...Retail?
Schools Get Low Marks for Allowing Consumer Culture in the Classroom
Page 3
Letter fromBetsy Taylor
Page 4
What’s Happeningat the Center
Page 5
In Praise of Unsung Heroes
Page 8
Tracking theGlimmer of Hope
Page 10
Bad,Good andTruly Ridiculous
Page 12
Book Reviews &Recommendations
Page 13
Fun Box:Springtime 101
Page 14
Step by Step:Take a CAFE Break
Page 15
Orwell’s Corner
Page 16
Please Help UsSpread the Word
continued on page 2 

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