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DAILY 02.13.12

DAILY 02.13.12

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Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published Feb. 13, 2012.
Print edition of The Stanford Daily, published Feb. 13, 2012.

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FEATURES/3
ONE NIGHTSTAND
Tomorrow 
Partly Cloudy 
5541
Today 
Mostly Cloudy 
5842
SPORTS/5
SISTERS SHINE
Stanford pulls away fromBruins
By MARY HARRISON
STAFF WRITER
The Offices of Undergraduate Ad-mission and Financial Aid are waitingto see what impact two national highereducation initiatives, set forth by Presi-dent Barack Obama in his Jan. 24 Stateof the Union address, will have on theUniversity. University officials inter-viewed by The Daily, however, said theyare confident Stanford is already meet-ing most, if not all, of the recommenda-tions that the government may make.Obama proposed that all collegesbe required to compile a uniform “col-lege scorecard” to provide studentswith information such as the cost of at-tendance, average loan debt, ability torepay student loans and graduationrate. He also proposed changing howfederal financial aid is awarded so thatmore aid would go to schools that ac-tively attempt to keep costs down.Karen Cooper, director of financialaid at Stanford, said that the Universityalready shares much of the informationabout its financial aid program thatwould be included in the proposed col-lege scorecard.“We hope that [prospective stu-dents] know all about our financial aidprogram when they’re applying,”Cooper said.To give students a concrete idea of how much financial aid they can expectto receive from Stanford, the Universi-ty created a financial aid calculator onthe office’s website, which Cooper saidgets more than 10,000 hits per month.“It’s not just about meeting federalexpectations,” said Richard Shaw, deanof Undergraduate Admission. “We’vehad our calculator for a long time be-fore these new federal guidelines wereannounced.”According to Shaw, Stanford hasbeen trying to implement measuressimilar to the President’s plan for quitesome time.“We think we’ve been out ahead of the curve,” he said.“To be honest, we’re one of the mosttransparent universities, and we’ve al-ways been transparent,” Shaw added.The University does not know ex-actly what information will be requiredas part of the scorecard, but both Shawand Cooper said they are optimisticthat Stanford will not have to drastical-ly change its practices.“We don’t know exactly [what thenew requirements will be] . . . we’re ina period of watchful waiting,” Coopersaid.She said she is not concerned aboutthe President’s second proposal to di-rect financial aid to schools that makeconcerted efforts to lower their tuitioncosts.“Stanford is an expensive school,but on the whole because of our gener-ous financial aid, [tuition] is typicallynot a factor in students’ . . . decisions[of whether or not to attend Stanford],”she added.“We think, certainly from our van-tage point, that Stanford is a model inits opportunities given to low-incomestudents,” Shaw said.For the moment, the University iswaiting for the President’s administra-tion to issue concrete guidelines aboutwhat exactly this new program will en-tail.“Even though we have a high tu-ition rate, Stanford is affordable for ourfamilies,” Cooper said. “We’re justwaiting to see what the federal conceptof ‘affordability’ is.
Contact Mary Harrison at mharri- son15@stanford.edu.
Index 
Features/3 •Opinions/4 •Sports/5 Classifieds/6
Recycle Me
 An Independent Publication
 www.stanforddaily.com
MONDAY Volume 241
February 13, 2012Issue 9
 The Stanford Daily
NEWS BRIEFS
Dancersfundraise,fight AIDS
By MARSHALL WATKINS
DESK EDITOR
More than 500 dancers, moralers and spectatorsgathered at the Arrillaga Alumni Center over theweekend for Stanford’s eighth annual 24-hourDance Marathon.The event raised $60,085.97 a nearly 7.7-percent decline from last year’s total of $65,075.50to combat HIV/AIDS and support internation-al awareness of the disease. As in previous years,dancers pledged to raise a target sum of $192 priorto the event.FACE AIDS, an organization founded in 2005by Stanford students, previously matched fundsraised by Dance Marathon.The event’s 2011 and 2012 fundraising totalsboth constitute significant drops from the 2010high of $178,000, which Philip Tom ’14, DanceMarathon financial director, attributed to FACEAIDS no longer matching Dance Marathon’sfundraising total.Ninety percent of Dance Marathon’s proceedswill go to Partners in Health (PIH), which will usethe funds for a community health workers’ pro-gram in Rwanda. $192 represents the cost of train-ing and paying a community health worker inRwanda for a year.“In lots of places, $50,000 especially inhealthcare — can’t get you that much,” Alex Cole-man ’12, Dance Marathon’s overall director, said.“In some places like Rwanda, it is the differencemaker. It gives mothers the chance to have theirchildren live.”The remaining 10 percent of funds raised willgo to Bay Area Young Positives, a San Francisconon-profit organization dedicated to servingyoung people diagnosed with HIV and raisingawareness of the virus in local communities.Approximately 300 dancers and 200moralers, who support the dancers in three-hourshifts — registered for the event, a turnout similarto last year. While some registrants failed to showup at the event, event organizers commented onparticipants’ enthusiasm and cited particularlystrong turnouts from freshmen and Greek soci-eties.“Those that show up actually stay,” Rachel See-man ’14, Dance Marathon’s campus outreach di-rector, said. “It’s really cool to see the bondingamong the group that stays from 1 p.m. to 1 p.m.”Seeman added that all funds raised go directlyto Dance Marathon’s partners. Dance Marathonwas funded partially through registration fees col-lected from dancers and moralers, but largelythrough ASSU special fees.Kay Williams ’12 emphasized the contributionof freshmen who constituted a majority of dancers — to the event, in particular citing the ef-
UNIVERSITY
Administrators await effects of Obama plans
24-hour dance-a-thonraises over $60,000
UNIVERSITY
Software evaluates apps for plagiarism
By JOSEE SMITH
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
The Office of Undergraduate Admis-sions turned to computer software tocombat application fraud this past fallwhen it began using Turnitin for Admis-sions to check application essays for pla-giarism. Those admitted through restric-tive early action to the Class of 2016 werethe first to have their applications submit-ted to the database, which is already beingused by approximately 100 colleges anduniversities around the country.“It’s really the few that attempt to getaway with this sort of thing [plagiarism]that should be forewarned that it’s not intheir best interest,” Director of Under-graduate Admissions Bob Patterson said.“It’s our expectation they’re going to behonest and open and transparent in theirapplication, and when they sign off thateverything is their work, that has to havemeaning.”Patterson said that while his office hasnot been made aware of any instances of plagiarism from applicants in past years, itwas “concerned there could be.”He added that the University decidedto utilize the software because of reportsin the media about higher levels of plagia-rism in applications.“If we do see that there is plagiarism inan application, we will definitely reach outto the student and ask for the student’sinput, and then we would make decisionsfrom there,” he said.The software compares submitted ad-missions documents with its extensivedatabase of “Internet content, subscrip-tion content and previously submitteddocuments to create a comprehensiveSimilarity Report,” according to the Tur-nitin for Admissions website.This Similarity Report recognizes bothword-for-word and paraphrased textmatches, which are then highlighted andlinked back to the corresponding docu-ments in the database. The Report alsogives the option of building an internaldatabase for all of the institution’s appli-cations, as well as the option of participat-ing and submitting content to the centralTurnitin for Admissions database.Stanford is one of only a dozen univer-sities using Turnitin for undergraduateprograms. Most admission offices cur-rently use the software to assess graduateschool applications.Anna De Cheke Qualls, director of graduate affairs and admissions at JohnsHopkins University, said that her officebegan using the software in Sept. 2011.According to Qualls, the software is im-portant because the University requiresapplicants to give complete disclosure intheir applications. If applicants don’t ex-ercise that full disclosure, they are reject-ed, she said.“Our faculty have a greater ability tofocus on applications, not authentica-tion,” Qualls said. “We try to safeguardour institution and our departments frommaking an inappropriate decision.”The graduate admissions office atJohns Hopkins gives the software to vari-ous departments, which can then individu-ally decide how they wish to use it. Qualls
Please see
DANCE
, page 2
Girls able to rewire brain toprevent depression, study finds
By THE DAILY NEWS STAFF
A study by the Stanford Psychology Department hasshown that girls’ brains can be rewired to not overreact tonegative stimulation, thus preventing at-risk girls from ex-periencing depressive episodes, according to a Thursdaypress release. Negative stimulation can cause increasedheart rate, blood pressure and cortisol production, whichare all factors that can precede a depressive episode.The research team, led by professor Ian Gotlib andfunded by the National Institute of Mental Health, fo-cused on 10- to 14-year-old girls who at-risk for depres-sion because their mothers are depressed or have previ-ously been depressed.The girls underwent functional magnetic resonanceimaging (fMRI) at the Richard M. Lucas Center for Imag-ing, so that the researchers could observe how much bloodflowed to the amygdala region of their brains when theywere shown negative images — for example, a photo of anaccident.The researchers then asked the girls to think aboutpositive experiences in order to attempt to dampen thenegative response, such as going to the beach or playingwith pets.Participants also completed a “dot-probe task” inwhich they were shown one of two pairs of faces: a neutral
Please see
 APPS
, page 2
Fleet feet in the Foothills
ROGER CHEN/The Stanford Daily
Racers embarked on the first annual Stanford Dish Race Sunday. Individuals and dorm groups ran and walked the Dish courseduring the race, sponsored by the Stanford Running Club, which offered prizes for fastest times and highest dorm participation.
Please see
BRIEFS
, page 2
 Admissions Office uses Turnitin database on early admit essays
 
2
N
Monday, February 13, 2012
 The Stanford Daily
and happy face pair or a neutraland sad face pair. A dot appearedon the computer screen, which theparticipant then clicked. Afterclicking, she was led from the neg-ative toward the more positiveimage in order to train the brainto not overreact to negative stim-uli, according to the press release.Days after the experiments,the girls returned to the StanfordMood and Anxiety DisordersLaboratory to undergo an in-duced stress test so that the re-searchers could measure anychange in physiological reaction.Thus far, the researchers havefound that girls react less to stressfollowing the experiments.
 — Alice Phillips
Researchers findViagra may curerare pediatriclymphatic disease
By THE DAILY NEWS STAFF
Researchers at the StanfordSchool of Medicine and LucilePackard Children’s Hospital mayhave discovered a surprising curefor a rare lymphatic condition inchildren, according to a School of Medicine press release. The silde-nafil drug, commonly known asViagra, has shown potential tocure these malformations and isthe subject of a new clinical trial atthe School of Medicine andPackard Children’s Hospital.Lymphangiomas “are over-growths of the one-way lymphchannels that return extra fluidfrom our tissues to the blood-stream,” read the School of Medi-cine press release. “Rarely, in in-fants and children, these channelsgrow abnormally large and causedeformity and death.”While lymphangiomas aremainly cosmetic, the risk that thelymphangiomas could interferewith organs such as the heart,lungs and throats necessitatesmedical action. Physicians no-ticed five months ago that silde-nafil, which was being used as ablood pressure medication, alsohad surprising affects on lymphat-ic malformations.“There has been no medicaltreatment for lymphangiomas;now all of the sudden there maybe one,” Al Lane, a physician in-vestigating the correlation, said inthe press release. While the func-tion of the drug in treating derma-tological illness is still unknown,Lane said he suspects that it mighthelp to drain the channels of thelymphatic system.While Viagra is most common-ly used to treat erectile dysfunc-tion, previous use of the drug totreat pulmonary hypertension inchildren reveals possible side ef-fects, including nausea, headachesand, in a few rare cases, sponta-neous erections.As of yet, the research teamhas treated three cases of lym-phangioma, which have been doc-umented and published in theNew England Journal of Medi-cine. Before they start routinelytreating patients, however, the re-searchers will need to secureproper U.S. Food and Drug Ad-ministration approval through aplacebo-controlled trial.
 — Jordan Shapiro
Inter-dorm waterconservationcompetition kicksoff 
By THE DAILY NEWS STAFF
Florence Moore (FloMo) resi-dence halls kicked off StanfordWater Wars, an inter-dorm waterconservation competition, Sun-day. Each hall’s water consump-tion will be measured from Feb.12 to March 12 through anAquacue Barnacle, a water man-agement product that claims torecord the amount of water usedwith at least 99.5 percent accura-cy.The over 450 undergraduatesliving in FloMo will participate inthe month-long event, sponsoredby Stanford’s Green LivingCouncil (GLC), Student Housingand the Silicon Valley companyAquacue. A similar competitionat the University of California-Merced showed promising re-sults; students reduced their waterconsumption by 14 percent andsaved 89,000 gallons of wateroverall.The winning residence hall inFloMo will receive $1,000 in prizemoney.The GLC, founded in 2007, se-lected Aquacue’s products as thebasis of this year’s competition inorder to bring a more modern,technical approach to conserva-tion on campus, according to aGLC press release. Students willhave access throughout themonth to real-time data coveringthe water use in their dorms. Si-multaneously, the GLC will hostmultiple events to educate theresidents about daily conserva-tion techniques and the impor-tance of water conservation.The seven residence halls,which were specifically selectedbecause FloMo dorms have sepa-rate water lines, will compete insix groups to determine whichdorm can save the most water percapita. Paloma and Mirlo resi-dents will compete together dueto the fact that they share a watermeter.FloMo Water Wars is part oneof a two-part Stanford Conserva-tion Cup hosted by the GLC. Parttwo will be an electricity conser-vation effort running March 2 toMarch 23.
 — Jordan Shapiro
BRIEFS
Continued from front page
IAN GARCIA-DOTY/The Stanford Daily
 A student rode a bike in the Florence Moore courtyard to power a blender during the Green Living Council’skickoff event for Water Wars 2012. The FloMo dorms will compete to reduce their water usage for a month.
said that while her office has heardof anecdotal instances of the soft-ware’s use, including text matchesin applications, the office needsmore data about how the plagia-rism-checking software is beingused in individual departments todetermine its functionality.Andrew Ainslie, senior associ-ate dean at UCLA’s AndersonSchool of Management, said thatwhile faculty members have usedthe software in classrooms formany years at the graduateschool, it has only recently beenmade available for admissionsuse.“Initially we used it to see whatsorts of results it would get for us,”Ainslie said. “It seemed like agreat source of information aboutpeople who are plagiarizing, and itis able to verify the plagiarism.”Ainslie noted that the softwarelinks to places from where plagia-rism is detected, such as when theapplication shares a quote withanother document on the Inter-net.“It seems like a very useful toolto ensure that the people we allowinto the program are the rightkind of people . . . It is a prettymajor offense to pass off some-one’s intellectual property as yourown,” Ainslie said.“We think it is important thatstudents are honest in their appli-cations,” Patterson said. “We justwant to make sure we are doingeverything that we can.”
Contact Josee Smith at jsmith11@stanford.edu.
 APPS
Continued from front page
forts of the freshman “MoraleCommittee” in mobilizing agroup of participants that theevent’s upperclassmen organizersfind it harder to reach.Differences from previousDance Marathons included theintroduction of a contemplationroom, which featured materialson AIDS awareness and an“AIDS quilt.” The quilt includedsections provided by members of the Stanford community whohave had friends or family die of the disease.Nineteen student groups from Dv8 to the Stanford Band— as well as University adminis-trators such as Dean of Freshmanand Undergraduate AdvisingJulie Lythcott-Haims ’89, sup-ported and entertained dancersthroughout the night. Dancerswere provided with snacks andmeals, as well as the presence of paramedics in the case of anymedical issue.
Code Jam
Elsewhere in the Alumni Cen-ter, approximately 30 hackersgathered for a 24-hour Code Jamheld at the same time as DanceMarathon. The Code Jam sharesresources and charity partnerswith Dance Marathon.The event, now in its fourthyear and organized by Code theChange, tasks participating hack-ers with programming for a num-ber of non-profit organizations,with an emphasis on projects eas-ily accomplishable within the 24-hour time frame. Coding tasksrange from web development andweb applications to specializedprojects such as a collaborationwith a Ugandan university onagricultural tracking.Sam King ’12, Code Jam’s di-rector, acknowledged that thisyear’s turnout was significantlylower than last year’s high of 65participants, but attributed thedrop to Code the Change’s deci-sion to put on two events perquarter.King approximated that thescheduling change would lead toa tripling in overall participantnumbers without much addition-al cost or planning and the abilityto scale the event to other schools.“The reason we decided tostep it up is that there was such acompelling demand for computerscientists who wanted to use theirskills for social change — andalso from non-profits who need-ed technical help,” King said.In addition to raising around$10,000 from corporate partners,King pointed to the scarce natureof computer scientists — and themarket price of their work — asevidence of the value added byevents such as the Code Jam. Headded that such events bring is-sues of social justice to computerscience.“Computer scientists needsomeone to show them the con-nection with social change,” Kingsaid. “We need to get rid of thestereotypes and show people thatit’s about making the world a bet-ter place.”
Contact Marshall Watkins at mt-watkins@stanford.edu.
DANCE
Continued from front page
We need to get ridof the stereotypesand show peoplethat it’s aboutmaking the worlda better place.
— SAM KING,
Code Jam director 
 
By NEHAN CHATOOR
T
he doors of the Arrillaga AlumniCenter flew open, revealing hallsbedecked with red and white bal-loons and walls flanked by ban-ners sporting FACE AIDS in-signia.The students, dressed in eccentric cos-tumes such as tutus and Stanford capes in ablend of flamboyant colors, trickled into aroom thumping with electronic music.While a huge number of students went upto the check-in desk for Dance Marathon, agood number went down the other end of thehall where Code Jam, informally referred toas the “Hackathon,” was being held.Code Jam is a campus-wide event open tothose with coding experience. Coders volun-teer to help out with a number of program-ming projects for various nonprofit organiza-tions.Sam King ’12, Code Jam’s director, notedthat a lack of “techie” involvement in DanceMarathon inspired the event in the firstplace.“There were not a lot of computer scien-tists participating in Dance Marathon, andthat was probably because they wanted amore tangible way of using their skills, so westarted within Dance Marathon as the DanceMarathon Code Jam,” King said.“The collaboration worked really well be-cause we bring a more direct service compo-nent to Dance Marathon, and DanceMarathon brings a lot of energy to ourevent,” he added.The purpose of Code the Change’s CodeJam is to allow computer scientists to workwith non-profits in a beneficial — andunique — way. Code the Change helps stu-dents accomplish this in two ways: by aidingthe nonprofits with their social change initia-tives and by raising funds for FACE AIDS —an organization dedicated to increasingawareness about HIV/AIDS.This year’s Code Jam coded for a numberof organizations founded to improve the livesof others, much like FACE AIDS does for theHIV/AIDS community. For instance, a teamof four worked on developing a web-basedapplication for Nilsby, a non-profit that facili-tates a support system for families with spe-cial-needs children, while another team of three coders volunteered to code for Support-ing Initiatives to Redistribute Unused Medi-cine (SIRUM), an organization that helps re-duce the supply chain gap between hospitalswith extraneous unused medicines and freeclinics that lack such supplies.Palo Alto Mayor Yiaway Yeh and thecity’s IT team were present at the event andcollaborated with Stanford students to de-velop a program which lists the streets of Palo Alto, their conditions and the construc-tion work the city has been doing on certainstreets, along with an explanation of why thiswork is needed.Both the energetic atmosphere of DanceMarathon and the inspiring causes forwhich these students were coding — encour-aged the coders during the entire 24 hours of intense “hacking.”According to Elliot Lui’13, leader of theNilsby project group, the event “[was] ex-hausting, but [we were] proud of what wewere doing.”Despite the reputation many computerscience majors have of being adept at stayingup late and pulling all-nighters, the organizersput effort toward ensuring a good, and nottoo stressful, time for the participants.Angad Singh ’14, project director of Codethe Change, noted that participants couldtake occasional naps during the 24 hours andwere kept well-fed with an array of snacks,chips, juice and Gatorade. In order to staypumped, the hackers took breaks to partici-pate in Dance Marathon, dancing to get theirblood flowing and keep their energy up forcoding.The coders’ enthusiasm and effort certain-ly did not go unnoticed outside of the Stan-ford bubble.“It is an incredible selection of students,and their willingness to share their skills withall these community organizations, includingthe city of Palo Alto, is inspiring,” Yeh said.“All of these organizations clearly have aneed for skills to be applied in a way that hasa lot of social benefit and the students’ contri-bution of their skills is completely incredible.”
Contact Nehan Chatoor at nchatoor@stan- ford.edu.
By NICOLE KOFMAN
F
or a full 24 hours, from 1 p.m. on Sat-urday, Feb. 11 to 1 p.m. on Sunday,Feb. 12, the Arrillaga Alumni Cen-ter pulsated with energy and enthu-siasm as Stanford’s eighth annualDance Marathon rocked campus all day —and all night — long.After spending months fundraising forFACE AIDS, a student-led nonprofit com-mitted to fighting HIV/AIDS, hundreds of students took a literal stand for the cause andpledged to stay on their feet for at least a por-tion of the event, if not all 24 hours.Walking into the building for my shift, Igot a preview of the event’s energy from thewelcome crew’s attitudes during registration.Their bright smiles matched their neon attireas they signed in dancers, handing outnametags and purple “Dancer” T-shirts tothe participants.Inside the dance room, the enthusiasm wascontagious. Throbbing speakers flanked alarge stage, sending dance music boomingthroughout the room. The beams from color-ful disco lights spun across the floor andclimbed the walls, spotlighting the cardinal redballoons and banners made by dorms acrosscampus to cheer on the dancers.Opposite the stage hung an enormousDance Marathon calendar, showcasing thedifferent holidays throughout the year thatmade up the marathon’s theme, “Seasons of Love.” Every three hours, the “season”would change and dancers would receive abracelet to signify the amount of time theyhad been dancing.The dancers’ attire reflected their highenergy. Neon tank tops, glitter spandex, pinktutus, short shorts, knee-high socks and color-ful caps abounded. Several dancers whostayed for the entire event even broughtenough clothes to put together different rallyoutfits throughout the 24 hours.During the first hour, I had the chancewitness a piece of the camaraderie and com-munity that would only continue to developduring the following 23 hours. When Shaki-ra’s “Waka Waka” filled the room, one at atime we came together to learn the dance. Bythe time the song ended, at least half of thedancers were moving in sync, coordinatingour shimmies and claps with one another andthrowing our heads back at once.As a Dance Marathon tradition, everyyear the organizers choreograph a dance to aselected song for the dancers to perform atevery “season change” — that is, every threehours. This year, participants came togetherto learn a dance to Wham!’s “Wake Me UpBefore You Go Go.” Some dancers were soengaged with the dance that they continuedto groove even after they were permitted tosit down after the marathon event ended.Though the choreographed dances werecertainly a highlight, several other momentsfrom the 24 hours offered breaks from theconstant movement. Talented studentgroups provided entertainment throughoutthe event, with not an hour going by withoutsome sort of encouraging performance. Acappella groups, dance troupes and studentbands all graced the stage with their pres-ence, and the Leland Stanford Junior Uni-versity Marching Band (LSJUMB) made asurprise performance to get the marathonersthrough their last hour. Some student groupsprovided dance lessons for participants, in-cluding Los Salseros and Swing Time. Anoth-er popular event was “yoga raving,” a relax-ing and reenergizing yoga session completewith singing and a massage train.For those who needed a break from theloud music and endless dancing, board andvideo games from Jenga to Boggle to SuperSmash Bros. to Wii Sports were on hand. Forthose dedicated students who could not af-ford to give up 24 hours without studying forupcoming midterms, the event offered tablestall enough for student to do schoolworkwithout breaking their promise to stay stand-ing. These tall tables doubled as pillows forsome dancers during the wee hours of themorning.While I expected there to be a significantdifference in the levels of energy in the roombetween 1 p.m. on Saturday and 1 p.m. onSunday, I was amazed to see that the dancersseemed to have just as much, if not more, en-ergy during their last hour of marathon-ingthan during their first.“The Reveal,” the point at which theevent organizers shared how much moneythe dancers raised, took place in the last 15minutes of the marathon. Holding up onedigit at a time, they dramatically disclosedthat their fundraising efforts had brought in agrand total of $60,085.97 — to be donated toPartners in Health, a nonprofit organizationthat aims to deliver health and social justiceto the world’s poorest communities, and BayArea Young Positives, a nonprofit that pro-vides support for young people with HIV.To celebrate this feat, the dancers tookpart in one more morale-dance before danc-ing to the last song, “The Final Countdown.”At exactly 1 p.m., the dancers simultaneous-ly collapsed to the floor for the first time in 24hours, only to pop back up a few secondslater to continue dancing — this time in cele-bration.While the dancing had come to an end,the event proved to be the best one-nightstand of the year.
Contact Nicole Kofman at nkofman@stan- ford.edu.
 The Stanford Daily
Monday, February 13, 2012
N
3
F
EATURES
ROGER CHEN/The Stanford Daily
Students across campus came together this weekend to participate in the eighth annual Dance Marathon, a 24-hour fundraiser.
 
DANCE
A
FRESHMAN
SDAYOF
 
A
FRESHMAN
SDAYOF
I was amazed tosee that thedancers seemedto have just as much, if not more, energyduring their lasthour.
ROGER CHEN/The Stanford Daily
In conjunction with Dance Marathon, Code the Change hosted Code Jam, a 24-hour event during which students coded for nonprofits.

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