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Kamalashila Bhavanakrama

Kamalashila Bhavanakrama

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BHfiVANfiKRAMA OF KAMALA⁄ÊLA
Translated by Parmananda Sharma
A.BHAVANAKRAMA-I (sequence of meditation-I)...........................................................................................................2A.1.Great compassion is of primary importance to the Bodhisattva; universality of pain; necessityof compassion....................................................................................................................................................................2A.2.How compassion should be meditated upon..........................................................................................................5A.3.It helps the thought of illumination...........................................................................................................................5A.4.Bodhicitta: thought of Enlightenment........................................................................................................................7A.5.Gnosis and means, prajñ› and up›ya, must be realized jointly......................................................................8A.6.Gnosis and means............................................................................................................................................................9A.7.No contradiction can be discovered in the scriptures........................................................................................13A.8.Aprati˝˛hitanirv›˚a; it can be explained only if there is cooperation of gnosis and means...............14A.9.Prajñ›: Ÿrutamayı, cint›mayı, bh›van›mayı......................................................................................................16A.10.The non-origination of all things is ascertained by a) ›gama and b) yukti.............................................17A.10.A.b, 1 origination is not uncaused................................................................................................................18A.10.B.b, 2 origination is not caused; criticism of God as creator..............................................................18A.10.C.b, 3 a noneternal cause is also illogical..................................................................................................19A.11.Other reasons. Criticism of the notion of matter (and atoms), of immateriality (vijñ›na), of external objects as being distinct from mind........................................................................................................20A.12.Bh›van›maprajñ›....................................................................................................................................................21A.13.⁄amatha............................................................................................................................................................................22A.14.Six defects and eight counteragents.........................................................................................................................25A.15.Dhy›na, etc.......................................................................................................................................................................27A.16.Method of meditation according to Laºk›vat›ra; vic›ra on the dharmas (no object, no subject)etc.........................................................................................................................................................................................29A.17.Meditation on the absolute.........................................................................................................................................31A.18.Definite elimination of kleŸa- and jñeya-›vara˚a.............................................................................................33A.19.Absolute and conventional; pram›rtha and sa˙v¸ti.......................................................................................37A.20.Progress in meditation, yuganaddham›rga........................................................................................................38A.21.Pratipatti...........................................................................................................................................................................40A.22.The stages: (a) adhimukticary›................................................................................................................................41A.23.The ten bhÒmis and the BuddhabhÒmi...................................................................................................................43B.BHfiVANfiKRAMA-II............................................................................................................................................................48D.BHfiVANfiKRAMA-III...........................................................................................................................................................71
 
Bh›van›krama
 by fic›rya KamalaŸıla (tyanslated by Paramananda Sharma)
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A.
 
BHAVANAKRAMA-I (SEQUENCE OF MEDITATION-I)
I shall briefly describe ‘bh›van›krama’
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or the sequence of meditation in accordance with therules of conduct prescribed for an ‘›dikarmika’
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in the Mah›y›na sÒtras.Those desirous of attaining ‘sarvajñat›’
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speedily should, in essence, try to practise these threethings: ‘karu˚›’,
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‘bodhicitta’
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and ‘pratipatti’.
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A.1.
 
GREAT COMPASSION IS OF PRIMARY IMPORTANCE TO THEBODHISATTVA; UNIVERSALITY OF PAIN; NECESSITY OF COMPASSION 
Knowing that ‘karu˚›’ is the basic root of all dharma practices of Lord Buddha’s teachings, itshould be contemplated or meditated upon at the very outset. As has been said infirya-dharma-sangeti:“So the bodhisattva mah›sattva firya AvalokiteŸvara said this to Lord Buddha, ‘O Lord! a bodhisattva should not receive instruction in various dharmas. If he thoroughly practises asingle dharma with devotion, all other dharmas will be his. Now, what is that singledharma? It is ‘mah›-karu˚›’. Through ‘mah›-karu˚›’ all other Buddha dharmas
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are in thepalm of a bodhisattva’s hand, O Lord! just as where-so-ever a ‘chakravartin’ ruler’schakra-jewel moves, there do his mighty armies, so also, O Lord! where-so-ever a bodhisattva’s ‘mah›karu˚›’ goes, thither do all Buddha dharmas follow. O Lord! just as allother senses function so long as life-breath stays so also as long as mah›karu˚› stays allother dharmas for the bodhisattvas are generated’.” -It has been said in firy›k˝aya-mati-nirde˝a: 
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Bh›van›krama – ‘bh›van›’ is meditation; it consists of visualisation and contemplation of a resolve, anobject or an idea and strictly meditating on it in accordance with vows undertaken; the sequence of meditational process. For example, ‘maitrı’, ‘karu˚›’, ‘mudit›’ and ‘upekŸa’ are the four exalted states of the mind. Also called ‘brahma-vih›ra’ the ‘bh›van›’ of these four leads the practitioner to ‘samyaka’pratipatti or true realisation, his mental defilements having evaporated.
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‘›dikarmika’ – a novice initiate who wishes to pursue the bodhisattva path, of the four-fold tantraquadrangle in Mah›y›na-kriya-tantra, carya-tantra, yoga-tantra and anuttar-tantra – kriy›tantra’sstandard text is Adikarma-pradeep which deals with the rules of initiation and subsequent conduct asprescribed for an ›dikarmik bodhisattva’
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sarvajñat› – the knowledge of the true nature of all phenomena, that is, ‘ni¯svabh›vat›’.
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karu˚› – compassion.
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bodhicitta – enlightened mind.
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pratipatti – perception, comprehension.
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dharma¯ – disciplines, instructions, practices.
 
Bh›van›krama
 by fic›rya KamalaŸıla (tyanslated by Paramananda Sharma)
3“moreover, O bhadanta,
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Sh›radavati’s son! the bodhisattvas’ ‘mah›karu˚›’ isinexhaustible. And, how is it so? Because, it is ‘purvangam›’,
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O bhadanta Sh›radavati’sson! just as breathing in and breathing out is the ‘purvagami’
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or precursor of life-breath,so also in Mah›y›na, a bodhisattva ‘s ‘m›hakaru˚›’ is a pre-requisite for the collection of ‘punya’ or merit”.Also, in the firya-gay›Ÿir˝a:“O MañjuŸrı! What is the beginning of the conduct of bodhisattvas and what theiradhi˝th›na?
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” “MañjuŸrı replied ‘O Deva-putra! the beginning of a bodhisattva’s conduct is‘m›h›karu˚›’ and its adhi˝th›na the beings.”By it, i.e. ‘mah›karu˚›’, inspired the bodhisattvas, with
<14>
little concern for themselves,work assiduously for collecting merit through long, arduous periods of time with the sole objectof others’ well-being. So it has been said in firya-Ÿraddhbal›dh›na:“For the well-being of sattvas through ‘mah›karu˚›’, there is no joy which a bodhisattvadoes not renounce.”In this manner, by engaging himself in the most difficult situations and by collecting(sambh›ra)
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merit quickly, he attains ‘sarvajñat›’. Therefore, the root of all Buddha-dharmas is‘mah›karu˚›’.” It was through holding on to ‘mah›karu˚›’ that Lord Buddha, after attaining‘sarvajñat›’, continued to work for the whole world. The Lord’s ‘mah›karu˚›’ is thus the veryreason for the Lord not entering ‘nirv›˚a’.It, i.e. ‘mah›karu˚›’, is (born from and) augmented by constantly reflecting in the mind overthe sufferings of beings. All ‘sattvas’ are suffering from the three-fold pain
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of du¯khasrampant in the three worlds’,
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– (reflecting) like this one should fix one’s thought on all beings.The Lord has described how hell-beings continue to suffer for long periods from such tortures asfire-burning; so also ‘pretas’,
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through suffering from du¯kha-fire with extreme hunger andthirst, get emaciated in body and suffer terribly for a hundred years even; such as these have 
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bhadanta – an honorific for a realised monk.
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pÒrvangam› – that which goes ahead of a thing; precursor, fore-runner.
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as at 9 above.
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adhiŸth›na – object of contemplation, focal idea to reflect on.
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sambh›ra – accumulation, collection.
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trividha du¯kha – three-fold suffering of body, mind and speech.
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traidh›tuka – beings living in the three worlds of humans, gods and hell dwellers, the earth, the heavens,the hells.
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pretas – disembodied spirits, ‘preta-loka’ is one of the six realms of existence after death.

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