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After the "Big Bang" by Jesse C. Jones -- Chapter 3 The Fall

After the "Big Bang" by Jesse C. Jones -- Chapter 3 The Fall

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Published by Sandra Crosnoe
This chapter describes the fallout from the act of disobedience on the part of Adam and Eve while in the Garden of Eden. The purpose of God in placing the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil, and the Tree of Life, in the Garden are discussed, as well as the probable mind-set of both Adam and Eve when they disobeyed God and ate of the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil. The means by which the death that entered Adam’s body was passed on to all his descendants is also proposed.
This chapter describes the fallout from the act of disobedience on the part of Adam and Eve while in the Garden of Eden. The purpose of God in placing the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil, and the Tree of Life, in the Garden are discussed, as well as the probable mind-set of both Adam and Eve when they disobeyed God and ate of the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil. The means by which the death that entered Adam’s body was passed on to all his descendants is also proposed.

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Published by: Sandra Crosnoe on Feb 14, 2012
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02/10/2014

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3 The Fall
“And out of the ground made the Lord God to growevery tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food; the tree of life also in the midst of the gardenand the tree of knowledge of good and evil.” 
Genesis 2:9
Introduction
God created Adam in His own image: spirit, soul, and body. Adam wastotally innocent: he had no knowledge of the meaning of good or evil. Themeaning of the words “
good 
” and “
evil
” in Genesis 2:9 is difficult toascertain, although many biblical expositors seem to feel that these wordsrefer to moral good and evil. There is some justification for this point-of-viewfrom such scriptures as Deuteronomy 1:19, in which Jewish children aredescribed as having no knowledge of good and evil, due to their tender ageand moral innocence. The actions of Adam and Eve after they disobeyedGod also imply moral guilt. Possibly, a more complete definition of good andevil is that given in Galatians 5:19-23:
Now the works of the flesh aremanifest, which are these; adultery, fornication, uncleanness, lasciviousness,Idolatry, witchcraft, hatred [enmities], variance [strife], emulations[jealousies], wrath, strife [factions], seditions [divisions], heresies, envyings,murders, drunkenness, revellings, and such like: of the which I tell youbefore, as I have also told you in times past, that they which do such thingsshall not inherit the kingdom of God. But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy,
43
 
 peace, longsuffering, gentleness [kindness], goodness, faith [faithfulness],meekness, temperance: against such there is no law.” 
 This passage of scripture describes the characteristics of a person “walking” in the Spirit, andtaking control over the lust of the flesh, and it gives us God’s definition of 
good 
” (spiritual fruit) compared to “
evil
” (works of the flesh). The argumentagainst applying this interpretation of good and evil to Genesis 2:9 is the factthat it comes from the NT, and applies to Christians who have the Holy Spirit,and can choose to follow the Spirit’s guidance, or succumb to lusts of theflesh. Although Adam did not have the Holy Spirit as do NT believers into Jesus Christ, he did have direct contact with God in the Garden, before thefall. We know that God does not change (Mal. 3:6), so we sense that God’sultimate purpose in this regard was for Adam to develop a Galatians 5:19-23knowledge of good and evil. The question is, How could He best bring thisabout?
The Act of Disobedience
In their “Commentary on the OT” Keil and Delitzsch suggest that God’sintent in placing the tree of life and the tree of knowledge of good and evil inthe Garden of Eden was to train Adam to be obedient, and to transform hisearthly nature to the spiritual essence necessary for eternal life. This soundsremarkably like the purpose of sanctification described in the NT: believersinto Christ present their bodies a living sacrifice to God through obedience,renew their minds through guidance of the Holy Spirit, and becomeconformed to the image of Jesus Christ in preparation for eternal life.
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Sanctification is the path to holiness a believer must follow until he joins Godin eternity. It seems evident that this was God’s plan in the Garden as well:to bring Adam to holiness through knowledge and spiritual maturity providedby God’s guidance. But Adam didn’t wait: he took on knowledge of evil thathe was not prepared to deal with. When God’s original plan for Adam failedHe was ready with Plan B: to lead men into holiness by sending a Savior toatone for man’s sin, and a Comforter to guide them into spiritual knowledge.God named the two trees in the midst of the Garden the tree of knowledge of good and evil, and the tree of life (Ge. 2:9). Names in the OThad great significance: eating the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good andevil allowed evil to enter Adam’s heart (mind). Adam was created with freewill: he was free to choose between right and wrong without influence fromany preconceived knowledge or memories. He seemingly acted based on hisassessment of the instant situation, he was totally innocent: he had neither asin nor a godly nature. He had no previous exposure to spiritual decision-making, and thus, he had no preconceived bias toward either “right” or“wrong”. After he chose to disobey God’s command things changed: hecame under the influence of what is identified as the Adamic (or sin) nature.Adam could have followed God’s plan, and refrained from eating of the treeof knowledge of good and evil. In this case he would have remained free tochoose as he saw fit, but teachable by God, somewhat like the NT believerwho is gradually conformed to the image of Jesus Christ by the renewing of his mind (Ro. 12:2). Sadly, Adam was drawn by his wife to disobey God’s
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