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After the "Big Bang" by Jesse C. Jones -- Chapter 6 Hope & Miraculous Three-Pound Computer

After the "Big Bang" by Jesse C. Jones -- Chapter 6 Hope & Miraculous Three-Pound Computer

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Published by Sandra Crosnoe
Most of us would probably agree that individuals who are hopeful about the future are not often depressed and are not likely candidates for suicide, but what causes one person to be hopeful, to view his or her glass as half full, while another person sees their glass at the same level as being half empty? What is hope? Where does it come from? If we have it, how can it be sustained? To answer these questions we need to have some idea about how the miraculous three-pound computer, the brain, is involved in determining our disposition. This chapter attempts to answer these questions.
Most of us would probably agree that individuals who are hopeful about the future are not often depressed and are not likely candidates for suicide, but what causes one person to be hopeful, to view his or her glass as half full, while another person sees their glass at the same level as being half empty? What is hope? Where does it come from? If we have it, how can it be sustained? To answer these questions we need to have some idea about how the miraculous three-pound computer, the brain, is involved in determining our disposition. This chapter attempts to answer these questions.

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Published by: Sandra Crosnoe on Feb 14, 2012
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02/10/2014

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6Hope and the Miraculous Three Pound Computer
Most of us would probably agree that individuals who are hopeful aboutthe future are not often depressed and are not likely candidates for suicide,but what causes one person to be hopeful, to view his or her glass as half full, while another person sees their glass at the same level as being half empty? What is hope? Where does it come from? If we have it, how can itbe sustained? To answer these questions we need to have some idea abouthow the miraculous three-pound computer, the brain, is involved indetermining our disposition.Hope is defined in Webster’s New World Dictionary as “a feeling that whatis wanted will happen, desire accompanied by anticipation or expectation”.Someone who has a positive feeling of anticipation and expectation aboutthe future, who feels that what they desire will happen, is not likely tobecome so depressed that they would end their life. The NT definition of hope is similar to Webster’s. In most versions of the Bible the Greek noun
elpis,
which means to anticipate with pleasure, and the Greek verb
elpizo,
which means to expect or confide (trust), are interpreted as
 
hope. Some of the OT Hebrew words that are translated by the English word hope areespecially insightful. These words have meanings of refuge, assurance,
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shelter, something waited for, a cord or attachment, and “fatness”. The useof the word “cord” (attachment) seems especially appropriate since itperfectly fits the description of hope in Hebrews 6:19, where it is identified asan
anchor 
of the soul. Any person whose soul is
anchored 
(attached by acord) to a solid foundation will not drift away on a sea of depression. The bodily location of hope is not discussed in the Bible; however, itseems clear from this biblical verse that hope is attached to, or identifiedwith, the soul. In Chapter 4, it was argued that decisions of the will are madein the soul. Thus, we see that for those who have “
laid hold on the hope set before them
” (Heb. 6:18 GNT), decisions of the will are anchored (bounded)by hope. In a place of refuge we feel safe and secure, not likely candidatesfor depression and suicide. Proverbs 13:12 says that hope deferred makesthe heart sick. This is an apt description of a person who has no hope.1 Thessalonians 5:23 indicates that man consists of three parts: body,soul, and spirit. Most biblical expositors argue that the soul includes ourmind, will, and emotions. A different argument is made in Chapter 4,wherein it was concluded that the mind and emotions are actually locatedwithin the heart, as defined by the Bible. The brain, and its associatedsoftware (the mind), is like a marvelous computer: it sifts, sorts, interprets,and stores information; reacts to impulses and other data input by sendingout messages to various parts of the body; is the seat of our senses andemotions; and has the capability for thinking and learning based on storedand real-time data. In the book entitled: “In His Image”, Philip Yancy and Dr.
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Paul Brand provide an awe-inspiring description of the human brain.“Physiologically, the whole mental process comes down to these ten billioncells spitting irritating chemicals at each other across the synapses or gaps. The web of nerve cells defies description or depiction. One cubic millimeter,the size of a pinpoint, contains one billion connections among cells; a meregram of brain tissue may contain as many as four hundred billion synaptic junctions. As a result, each cell can communicate with every other cell atlightening speed - as if a population far larger than earth’s were linkedtogether so that all inhabitants could talk at once. The brain’s total numberof connections rivals the number of stars and galaxies of the universe”. The adult brain weighs only ~3 pounds, but it receives signals frombillions of nerve cells, which make it by far the most complex and effectivecomputer ever devised. Significant research has been performed in therecent past to miniaturize electronic components so that computers could bereduced in size. As successful as these efforts have been, when compared tothe brain, they appear pitiful, indeed. Scientists have also tried to duplicatecertain functions of the brain for decades with limited success. It isimpossible for man to compete with the Master Designer, and difficult, atbest, to copy Him.We know that millions of computer-like programs and routines arepreprogrammed in our brain: we are “born” with them. This is the softwareof the brain, which we call the “mind”. We see this manifested in manydifferent ways every day, if we bother to look for it. One of the most
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