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CIA Chief name Kabul

CIA Chief name Kabul

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Identity of CIA-chief exposed
Identity of CIA-chief exposed

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Published by: censored31 on Feb 14, 2012
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SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED
United States Department of State
and the
Broadcasting Board of Governors
Office of Inspector General
Report of Inspection
Embassy Kabul,
Afghanistan
Report Number ISP-I-06-13A, January 2006
I
MPORTANT
N
OTICE
This report is intended solely for the official use of the Department of State or theBroadcasting Board of Governors, or any agency or organization receiving a copydirectly from the Office of Inspector General. No secondary distribution may bemade, in whole or in part, outside the Department of State or the BroadcastingBoard of Governors, by them or by other agencies or organizations, without priorauthorization by the Inspector General. Public availability of the document willbe determined by the Inspector General under the U.S. Code, 5 U.S.C. 552.Improper disclosure of this report may result in criminal, civil, or administrativepenalties.
SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED
 
 
SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED
TABLE OF CONTENTS
EY 
J
UDGMENTS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
C
ONTEXT
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
E
XECUTIVE
D
IRECTION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
P
OLICY AND
P
ROGRAM
I
MPLEMENTATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Political and Economic Sections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
 Afghanistan Reconstruction Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Provincial Reconstruction Teams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Public Affairs and Public Diplomacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Consular Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
ESOURCE
M
 ANAGEMENT
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Facilities and Real Property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
U.S. Agency for International Development Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
General Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Human Resources and Staffing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
International Cooperative Administrative Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Financial Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Medical Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Equal Employment Opportunity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Embassy Protective Detail. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Q
UALITYOF
L
IFE
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
M
 ANAGEMENT
C
ONTROLS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
I
NFORMATION
M
 ANAGEMENT AND
I
NFORMATION
S
ECURITY 
. . . . . . . . . . 55
F
ORMAL
ECOMMENDATIONS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
I
NFORMAL
ECOMMENDATIONS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
P
RINCIPAL
O
FFICIALS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
 A
BBREVIATIONS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED
 
 
SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED
KEY JUDGMENTS
In a nominally post-conflict environment, Embassy Kabul has major responsibility for nation building. The scope and duration of the task will requiresignificant human and financial resources. The Department must work toattract and assign qualified staff and to provide expanded office and housing facilities well into the future.
 The inspectors’ rightsizing review at Embassy Kabul produced a conflicting result. For a bilateral embassy in a poor and undeveloped third-world country of 29 million people, the embassy is too large. Contrarily, for a missioncharged with leading U.S. efforts to rebuild a shattered nation, conducting active counterterrorism and counternarcotics programs, and promoting democracy, the embassy may be too small.
 Afghanistan was the source of almost 90 percent of the global production of raw opium in 2004. Inevitably, counternarcotics issues will vie withcounterterrorism and counterinsurgency on the U.S. government’s policy agenda. Meshing these critical objectives is not easy or automatic.
Embassy Kabul is taking commendable steps to wean the host governmentfrom over-dependence on the U.S. government for policy guidance and policy decisions.
Embassy Kabul is staffed by energetic, capable employees who work tirelessly to accomplish their work. All assigned Americans are volunteers, afactor that enhances
esprit de corps 
.
 The U.S. mission in Afghanistan is bereft of institutional memory. This is, by far, the most serious impediment to good executive direction. Essentially theentire American staff turns over each summer, there is rarely any overlap, andsome officers assigned to Kabul are inexperienced in the responsibilitiesassigned to them. The embassy has proposed imaginative ways to amelioratethese problems. The out-of-country leave policy, a benefit provided by the Afghanistan service recognition package, exacerbates staffing problems.
 Almost all Afghan employees were hired after the embassy reopened in 2002.Overburdened Americans have little time to train, mentor, and evaluate thelocally employed staff. Supervision will be even more problematic whensome American officers move into the new chancery while their local employees work in temporary offices scattered across the compound.
OIG Report No. ISP-I-06-13A, Inspection of Embassy Kabul, Afghanistan, January 2006
SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED
1
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