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DMir_1912_05_23_001-navio misterioso

DMir_1912_05_23_001-navio misterioso

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TheD
THE MORNl
No.
2,677.
Registered
at the Q.I
as
a
News;
KING
GEO
irror
;#^lTH
THE
SECOND LARGEST
NET
SALE.
URSDAY, MAY 23, 1912
One Halfpenny.
jmVA SOVEREIGN
TO
BABY JUMBO,
"THE
DAILY MIRROR"
',
AT THE
CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW YESTERDAY.
Baby Jumbo,
The
Daily Mirror
elephant,
was
introduced
to the
King
and
Queenyesterday
on the
occasion
of
their Majesties' visit
to the
International Horticul-tural Exhibition
at
Chelsea. Baby Jumbo carried
on his
back
a box
with which
he
collected money
on
behalf
of the
Royal Gardener^' Benevolent Institution,
and the
King, through
his
equerry, graciously contributed
a
sovereign.
The
Queen
was
greatly amused when
she saw
Baby Jumbo,
and
asked many questions about
him.
(1)
A
little girl feeding Baby Jumbo.
(2) A
stroll through
the
grounds,
(3)]
Making friends.—
[Daily Mirror
photographs.)
 
Page
2
'Advertisers* Artnouncemenh,
THE
DAILY MIRROR
'Advertisers'Announcements.
May
23,
19l2
A
LONDON AMUSEMENTS.r»RURY LANE.—TO-NIGHT,
at
8, Arthur Col-
x)
lins prseflts Klaw
and
Erlanger's production
of
GeneralKw Wallace's BEN-HUR. Dramatised
by
William Voune-Matinees. Weds,
and
Sats,,
at
2.
Tels.. 2,BBe
Ger.
A
DELPHI THEATRE, Strand.—Sat. Next,
at
8.
Mr.
GEORGEEDWARDES
new
prodnction,AUTUMNMANCSUVRES.
A
play with music. First Mat.,
fct.,
June
1.
Box-office.
IQ
to
6.
Tels-. 2645.8836 Gerr,
A
LDWYCH. LOOKING FOR TROUBLE.
Every Ki'ening,
at
9.
.Mat., Sats..
3.
NEIL KENYON
and EVA
MOORE,Preceded,
itt
6-30.
by
A
Short Concert.
rOLLO THEATRE.—Every Evening, at 8.15,
THEGLAD EYE. Preceded,
at
8,15,
by
"
The Tatlers."Matinees' Every Wednesday
and
Saturday,
at
3.16.
C
~OMEDY. Ever^Evening,
.it 8.30,
'
THE
BEAR-IJ^ADER'S,
by B. 0,
Carton,Matinee EveryJWediiesday
and
Saturday,
at
2.30.
. .
PRITERiON,-At
9,'
THE NEW' SIN,
by B.
\J
Macdonaia Hastings. Preceded,
at
8.30,
by THE
KISS,
by
George Paston. Matinee, Weds., Sats..
at 3.
D
UKE
OF
YORK'S.—To-day,
.it
2.30 and 8.30.
CHARLESPHOHMANpresents
THE
"MIND
THE
PAINT
"
GIBI,,
hy
ARTHUR PINERO.
Matinee To-tjay
itna fiv^ty Thwrsday
and
Siturday,
at
2.50,
G
AIETY.—EVERY EVENING,
at
8."
A
New
Musical Play,
THE
SUNSHINEGIRL. MATINEE.EVERY
BATUBDAY,
at 3.
Box-office.
10 to 10.
G
ARRICK. ARTHUR BOURCHIER.At
8,46,
PBOPER PETER,
bj
feoncliion HofTe.At
8.20,
Helen Mitr. Matinee, .Wednesdays,
at
2.30._
H
AYMARKET^^S
and
it, by
arrangement withCyril Maude, BUNTY PUH3 THESTRISGS. 2.30
and
8.30.
"
Their Point
of
View.' Mats., •Weds,, Thure,. 8ats;SPECIAL, MATIMEE. -WHIT-MONpAV, ,May,„27.
H
ISMAJESTY'S.
8th
'London SHAKE-8PEAKEFESTIVAL; To-night, To-morrow
and
Sctur-day,
at 8,
TWEEFPHNIGHT, Saturday Matinee,
at 2,
OTHELLO.
_ _ ..
„_„J_
K
INGSWAY.—8.30,
'
EANNY'SFIRSTrT.AV.'
"
BeTnord Shaw
at
his
beKt." Mats., Weds.,
lats.,
 2,30.
SPECIAL MATINEETO-MOBROW,
at 3.
(Last
Mat,}
THE_DOUBL%GAME,Jjy__Maurtce Baring.
, '
TYCEUM,-THEMONK ANDTHEWOMAN.
XJ
.-RemaTkable
New
Romantic
Plaj,
hy
Fredk. Melville.Nightly, 7.45.^ Mats.. 2.30, Wed.,
Sat.
,
Gerr.
7617.
TVRICAt
9, THE
FIVEFRANKFORTERS.
XJ
At
8.30.
A
Comedietta.
Mat.,
Weds.,
at
2,36.
>
-jtrEM'.^To-night
at
8.3(1 MRS. DANE'S
DE-
i.1 PENCE.
Sir
Charles Wyndham, Miss Lena Ashwell.MATINEE. .Wednesday next,,at
2130.
PLAYHOUSE.-To-night
at\y
LOVE^AND
-TWHATTHEN
t
by B.
Macdonald Hastings, CYRILMAUDE. MARGERY MAUDE,
At
8.30,
"Before Breakfast." Matinee, Weds,
and
Bats,,
at
2.30.
' ,
P
RINCE'S THEATRE, Shaftesbury-av.„W,C,—
Nkhfy, 7,46 MAT,, Wed.,
»
t.,
2.30. Very RemarkablePlay,
by G,
Carlton Wallac<;,
THE
APPLE
OF
EDKN.
Pro-
duced
by
Walter
and
Fredk. Melville. Genr. 5,983.
Q
UIilEN'S.—Miss Sarah Broolce's Season. EveryEvening,
at
8.20,.THEEASIEST
WAY,
by
EUgenaWaiter. Matinee. Every Sat.,
at
2,16.
Box-omce.
10
o
10.
R
OYALTY. TO-DAY,
at
2.30
and
SSO".
.
Vedrenne
and
Eadie present
MILESTONES:
by
Amold Bennett
and
Edward Knoblaucli,MATINEES, TO-DAY.
and
THURS.
and
SATS.,
at
2.30.VEI>RENNE-J!;ADIE SPECIAL MATINEES:
TEVERY TUESDAY
and
FRIDAY,
at ».
PBTEft'S
CHANCE;
by
EDITHLVTTELTOM.-^ROYALTY.
S
T., TAMES'.—At
8.15
(except to-morrow
and
Sai),
a
new
piay. BELLA DONNA.GEORGEALEXANDER
ami
Mrs. PATRICK CAMPBELL.Matinee Every'Wed. ati^-Sat, (eKcept
May 35),
at 2. •QCALA IHKATKE, .
KINEMACOLOR.
O
-• —
TWICEDAILY, 2.30" and-8,0,WITHOUIt KING
AND
CjtJEENTHRO UGHINDIA.
S
HAFTESBURY.
• PRINCESS~CAFR1CE.
TO-NIGHT,
at
8.
Matinee, Weds.,
at 2.
V
AUDKVILLI'.,
Charles Kenyon presents'NIGHTLY,
at
8.30.
Mats..
Wed..
8at„
3,
RUTHER-FOBp.ANp SON by.K.
G.
Sqwerby.
Tel.,
Gerr. 3.818.
w
HITNEY. STRAND.
Every Evening,
at
8.15. Matinees, SatuTday,
2,IB.
THE JEW OF
PRAGUE,By ALFRED. WIlSON-BARRETT.
W
YNDHAM'S.-At
8.40,
Geri^ki
du
Maurier
and
Co.,
in
JELF'S.
Mat..
Weds,
and
Sats.,
at
3.40.
A LHAMBRA.-Mnriel Ridley
in
'THE
POOL.'.iX DAISIEIRVING, PAULTON
and
DOLEY, LOYAL'SCANINEWONDERS,
etc.
Eves.,
at 8.
H
IPPODROME, LONDON.—Daily,
at 2.30
•and
8^
INSTANTANEOUSSUCCESS
of •'
ARMS
AND
THEGIBt.,." including G
P.
HUNTLEY. MAY DES0U8A,JEANAYLWIN,
and
Stat Co.
Is.
to
£4
4B.
660
Gerr.
P
ALACE (Saison Riisse).—ANNA PAVLOVA,
ANTONNET
and
6R0CK. BARCLAY GAMMON.(Special PAVLOVA MAT. Every WED.,
at
3^1
EVGS.,
8.
-MAT: (reduced prices), SAT,
and
WHITMONDAY,
at
i. _
P
ALLADKJM.—6.20,
9.10;
Mon., Wed.,
Sat..
2,30, .6.20.
9,10. GEO.
MOXART, RUTHVINCENTWILL EVANS. LIANED'EVE. P0LUSK13. CRUIK-SHANK, WHlTCUNLIFFE,
etc.
Prices,
Bs,
to
6d.
pRVSTAL PALACE. CHINA.
\J
James Pain
and
Sons PresentA Wonderful Historical Spectacle.CHINA, CHINA.6PENIKG
DAY, MAY
35th,
1913.
Every Evening
at
,8,30 p.m.
Matinees. Whit Monday,May 27ti),
and
Saturday, 'Juno
let,
at 4
p.m.
"CHINA TOWN^" "CHINA TOWN."Natives
at
Work
and
Play.
-
China Tea-houses, "Restaurants, Pagodas, Theatre,
etc,
IMPERIAL AI-L BED ROPTE. MILITARY BANDS.NOVEL AMUSEMENTDEVICES.BEAUTIFUL GARDENS.
' '
Admission Daily
Is.
Return rail fare
and
admission frommost London
and
Tube stations,
Is.
6d.
M
ASKELYNE
&
DEVAl^T'S^MYSTERlisPSt. George's Hall.—Daily,
at 3 and 8,
MarchionessTownshends sketcli,
"
All
Souls' Eve
";
Tableaux
Fan
tomee; Haunted Window,
etc. Is.
to
Ss.
154S
May.
L
Y
M
P I A.
ROYAL NAVAL AND' MIUTARY TOURNAMENT.Patron—His Most Gracious Ma-jesty
the
King,Twice daily,
at
2.30
and 8
p.m.
May 23r<i
to
June 8tli.OPENING
BY H.M. THE
KINGTO-DAY,
nt
2.30 p.m.
BOX-OFFIOEa
NOW
OPEN.
66.
Victoria-street,
Tel.. No,
5,033
Gerrard.Oiympla (Addison-road
and
Hammersmith-road Entrances)Tel.,
No.
3,583
Kensington
(six
lines),
and
PrincipalBooking Agenfe.Reeeived seats, morning
and
evening, 4s.,
5s,,
7E
6d, and
lOa.
6d.
Boxes,
6 to 8
guineas.Lnnch^
and
Dinners
at
Lyons' Restaurant
at
any
time
T ONDON AERODROME, HENDMTliMv'
JJ
Sat.
(3.301,
Sun, and
Whit Mon, fnoon).
MTV
26
26 27
SECOND LONDONAVIATIONMEETING(Weather permitting). EASY ACCESS,
ed.,
Is.,. Bs,
6d.
BOARD
, RESIDEKCE
TO
LET.
T>0ARD
and
Ixwlging.—Lady offers comfortable apartmentsJ-»
in a
pretty suburb.
30
minutes from town, excellenttrain service from Waterloo, Ludgate Hill
and
Victoria-'terms moderate.—Address
D., 10,
Birdhurst-rd ColliersWood, Merton,
S.W.
DAILY
HAIL
Here
is
the new
tiii
of
BIRDS
-^the
Custard that
is
always
good.
There
is
only
one
quality.—Whether
you
buy
the id.
pkts.,
4d.
or
7^d.
boxes,
or
this
new
large SJd.
tin, you may be
sure
is
the
best Custard.
Its
absolute purity
and
clean
fresh flavor make
it
supreme.
The
Dish
in
Season
i
Gooseberries,
the
first
of
the
fruits,
with
Bird's—
the
really nutritious Custard.
This
Is
the
*<
ENSIGNETTE"
Camera.
It fits your waistcoat pocket. Good Lens and ShutterLoads
ia
Daylight.
See
your Photo Dealer
and
buy one to-day
for
the
"
Mail" Competition.
Full farliculan
and
specimen prints frei from
'.HpUGUTONS
£TD.»
Mmufactimrs,
88-9f,
High
HQtborn. London,
W.C.
•^
Prfce
^^^^^.
"/
^''V
r'/'f.
v/
TRY
IT
BY
APPOINTMENT
TOH.M.
THE
KINO.
MARVELLOUS
PREPARATION
Refreshing
as a
Turkish Bath. Invaluable
for
Toiiet Purposes.Removes Stains
and
Grease Spots from Clothing.Allays the Irritation caused by Mosquito Bites. Restores the Colourto Carpets.Cleans Plate
and
Jewellery. Softens Hard Water.Price Is. per Bottle. Of all Grocers, Chomists, Etc.
SCFtUBB
&
CO., LTD.,
GUILDFORD
STREET,
LONDON,
S.E.
DAY& MARTINS FAMOUS BOOT POLISH
OF
10-POINT SUPERIORITY.
These aro
the ten
distinguishinf! pfiinis
of
Superioriiyin
Day
& Martin's Boot Polish.
1. Economy
in
price
and
ose*
2,
BrJIHaney
of
Polish,
5.
Cleanliness
In Use.
4.
Saves Labour.
5.
Ad&ptabilify
to all
leather.
-
6.
Preservative properties.7t Softens Kard leather.8. Senders leather waterproof.9. Does
not dry up in the tin.
10.
Always rea^y
for
use.
1
-TTifiriTWiiiWiiawr'
~,
!••!
luaOkiMm-'f^
GARDENINO.
packed, carriage paid,
Is.
4d.-G.
F,
Letts,'Nurseryman'.
I59:
Hadleigh. Siilioilt.Oqn GEAND. Bedding Plants,, 2s. Gd.-All hardy stnHiJU
V and now
standing
out in the
open;
6
Geraniums,
6
Calceolarias,
6
Carnations,
15
Zinnias,
15
Asters
15
Stocks12 Chrysanthemums,
.10
Cosmos,
12
Antirrhinums,
20
Taset«s.
10
Coreopsis.
lO
Marguerites,
10
Papaver.
lO
Cynus Blue,
lO
Dahlias,
6
Double Sollyboclta,
12
ClimbingPlants,
15
Helianthus,
15
Schiainthus.
15
Phlox;
now
all
tha above
230
Bedding Plants packed
in
mosg
in a
nicebasket,
and
free
on
rail,
for the Iqw
slim
of
2s.
8d.—Q
S*
Lett-S. Nurseryman,
139,
Hadleigh. Suffolk
Onn
S^™^"tf
Plants.
Z%.
6d.!
m
EocJiety Chmps,
^W
2s. 6d.: 150
Hards Plants. 2B.
6d
Celery Cauliflowers. Sprouts, Cabbage, Onions, Lettuce;
Is. 100
postfree; bargain lists, trial seeds free.—Ligliton
57
KirtonBoston, Linos. •
E
ARLY Prize Chrysanthemums.-^The best
and
earliiMtever Offered;
all
winners; bloom July
to
November*require
no
more attention than
the
common Chrysanthemums;
12
Choice sorts, selected roots,
is.
3d.'
benutilttlhardy, early sorts; bloom from August;
onr
speciality
all
different. sra.nd varieties,
12
selected,
Is.; the two
collecttions,
2s.;
customer Writes: "Those
I had
before werebeauiilwl; this makes
my
third season buying from
you"'
gratis.
4
Clove Scented Carnations; carriage paid.—BangerBros.. Floral Nurseries, Bamsgate.
P
AN8IES, Prize Pansies.—We grow tiie larse priae
pan-
sies,
can win
anywhere; testimonials from exhibitorsdaily;
18, Is.;
gratis,
3
Wine Pansies;
for
beauty
of
colourthese cannot
be
surpassed; also
4
Clove Scented Carnations-'carriage paid.—Banger Bros., Fioral Nurseries, Pegwell
Bay!
Ramsgate.
P
BETTY Rapid Climbers.~5 beautiful Pink MorningGlories,
3
Lovely Yellow Hops,
3
Pure White' Clematis3 Sweet Scented Honeysuckle,
ail
climb well,
in
son
oc
shade
and
increase yearly,
12
roots.
Is.;
sure
to
thrive-gratis,
4
Clove Scentad Carnations, also
8
Wine Pansios-wirriage paid.—Banger Broi.. Floral NHrseries. Pegwetl
Bay,
Eamsgata.
•-•••...•'••
OJ^ OABNATIONa, Clove Scented, Is.—Early fiowering(
^^
Swtiet-Sceuted Cai'iiatioas, selected varieties,
na
giowjtfor market;
we
have
a
large stock
ol
beautiful
and
first-elass assortinent, grand colours; scarlet, rose, pink, crim-.EOn. whit«, etci; lirst early,
12
selected plants, sliowingbloom,
Is.;
second eary,
24, Is.; the
two collections,
Is. 9d.:
carriage paid.—Banger. Bros., Fioral Nurseries, PegwellBay, Aamsgate.
D
AHLIAS,-Prize Bahliag^—This collection unbeaten,
12
Cactus Dahiias,
Is.;
12
Fancy Dahlias,
Is.;
12
BhowDahlias,
la.;
gratis with each collection,
4
Giant HardyMarguerites;
or the
above
3
collecJiiona,
2s. 6d.;
carriagepaid,—Banger Bros., i'^loral Nurseries, Pogweil
Bay,
Hams-gate.
p:i\
QUALITY Bedding Plants,
Is,
6d.—Splendid grown
a^
plants; Fuchsifts, Calceolarias, Geraniums, Asters,BtocSe, iieliotrOpe, Petunias. Ageratums, Lobelia,
Mar--
guerites, carnations, Violas, Zinnias, Pentstemons, Lnpir.s,
etc.,
and
many other kinds; testimonials: Customer writes—
"
Your Qviality Collection beats quantity, easy
"; 50,
selected,
Is. 6d,
(worth .treble); eratis,
6
Oliibbers,
3
ScarletClematis,
3
Scarlet Honeysuckle; carriage paid.—BangerBros,, Floral Nurseries, Pegwell
Bay,
Ramsgate.•pRiZEyplect Cactus Dahlias.—This collection unequalled;A every
one
a
winner
and
true
to
name;
no
better
in
England; half-dozen.
Is. 6d.;
dozen,
2s. 6d.;
carriagepaid- notice-wo
ate the
only firm
o(
growers that havetaken
in
the
district
ol
Eamsgate
4
first prizes
4
years
in
succession,-Banger Bros., Flofal Nurseries, Pegwell
Bay,
ARTIFICIAL
TEETH,
L
ADV
Reida Medical
Aid
Scty., Ltd.—Gag, 2.I.Tattiflcial
teeth
at
hospital prices; payable weekly
if
desired.—Callor write, Sec,, Miss Gordon,
524,
OKford-et. Marble Arch.
T
EETH—Sets from
One
Guinea; recommended
by
"Truth"; pamphlet free.—Goodraan's (Ltd.l,
2,
Lud-
gate-hill. E.C.,
and
365, Iligh-st, Stratford,
E.
rpHEArtificial Teeth
Aid
Society. Ltd.—Painloa? extrac-JL tions,
2s.;
teeth
at
hospital prices,
by
weekly payments—The-EightHon. Lord Ualdon, Hon, Sec., l59,Oxlord-st,W.
AVIARIES.
rlANARl|;8, parrots,.bUdgeirigare; bast, ehenpeetf list fteo;
\-i
aviaries, cag«, appliances,—Eudd, Bird Specialist,Norwich,Kl^^^l
fs,
^'
-
'•^"H,.,
..•'•*••••
^
*i....
II
>\-'k
1As Daymar Boot Pulish
is
superior,
so are
Dayraar Metal Polish, Dnymar Floor I'olish,Daymar Grate Polish. Dayinar li'tirniturc I'olish,Daymar Knife Powder,
and
Dnymar PlatePowder.
Try
them—you will
use
no
other
if
you
try
//
your dealer
has not a
m-pply
of
Daymar.Polisliei
in
slock
he
can
obtain
the
same from
any
6}
the
large wholesalers,
or
direct from
t)ay
and
Martin,
Ltd.,
Borough
Road,
S.E.
VALUE
]/consisting
of
1
TIN OF
DAYMAR BOOTPOLISH.1 PACKET
OF
DAYMAH PLATE POWDER.1
TIN OF
DAYMAH METAL POLISH.1
TIN OF
DAYMAB FLOOR POLISH,
To everyone inserting
a
private emailadverlisement
of not
less space than2 lines
in "
Tlie Evening News"
on
Any
Day
This Week.
For Full Patliculars
see
to-(iay9
"EVENING
NEWS."
 
May 23, 1912THE DAILY MIRROR Page 3
HOW "THE DAILY MIRROR" RELIEVED STARVING ST. KILDA
Natives' Outburst of Gratitudefor Tug of Mercy.
PARLIAMENT'S GIFT.
Islanders Send Length of Tweed toSir Thomas Lipton.
DOCTOR'S REPORT.
Minister Who Lived on Bread andButter for Three Months.
TLOUE AND HOT WATER
(From Our Special Correspondent.)
OBAN,
May 32.-~I bring a message from the tinydistant island of St. Kilda to
The Daily Mirror
in London, It is
brief,
but eloquent of a simplepeople's deep-felt g^ratefulness.Mile
taingf.
A thousands thanks from thebottom of our hearts to " The Daily Mirror."Only a few days ago the inhabitants of St. Kildawere on the point of starvation. To-day they arerelieved of all anxiety.It has been a jnighty race against time to reachEurope's last outpost in the west before it wastoo late.
The 'Daily Mirror
relief tug Victor is one ofthe fastest tugs in the kurgdom, and the skipper,Ro'bert Paterson, is famous in Scottish shippingcircles for his ability. But ail his skill was neededto bring the tug through the mountainous seas.Captain Paterson and his crew, fully realised theurgency of our mission, and needed no bidding tostrain every ounce out of the tug.'And, at last, after twenty-nine hours of tossingaild heaving, we reached the " Island of Tears,"as St. Kilda is called in. Gaelic.ISLANDERS' DELIGHT.The islanders have alinost uncanny vision, andthe tug was sighted miles away. As soon as wearrived a boat filled with natives came to meet us,and when I shouted out that I had come with foodsupplies their delight knew no bounds.. There were frantic shouts of " Bhiur, bhiur!"{Food, food !), and when'I stepped in the boatold men and young pressed my hand^ slappedmy back and almost suffocated me with their embraces in their Celtic paroxysms of thanks.News of the islanders' pitiful, condition hadreached the Admiralty—thanks to the Press—withthe-result that the cruiser Achilles came in justbefore us, . : ,She only had orders, howeveTcto §ive absolute-necessities, and, although her captain was verykind, when we arrived we found no sugar, milk,butter or flour,Happily, the Victor was well equipped, withevery conceivable necessity from cocoa to pipesand tobacco, and on landing our little relief partyreceived an ovation.Men and women burst into tears, while DonaldFerguson, an octogenarian islander, burst put intoimprovised poetry in Gaelic which I was assuredwas as beautiful in its sentiment as it was musrcalto the ear.Donald does not know English, but he is neverso happy as when he can look at the pictures in
Ths Daily Mirror,
which are.his sole link withwhat he calls the great shadow land of theSas^nachs-
ONLY BREAD AND BUTTER TO EAT.
Mr, Maclean, minister, friend and adviser ofall St. Kildians, gave me some touching instancesof privations during the last few months. Even atthe Manse the diet since the beginning of Marchhas consisted of nothing but tea, bread and butter.—three-times a day for three months.In the village the position was even worse.
_
Formore than a month whole families have been livingon hot water and a handful of flour. Mothers havehad to tell children at four or five o'clock in theafternoon, " Go to bed, for I have no food to giveyou." . 'I was assured by the iriothers that the childrenhave been as good as gold, realising that.there wasnothing to do "but wait.It was a pathetic scene when Christina Mac-donaldj a beautiful baby girl nearly twelve monthsold, with wistful "blue eyes, golden hair, and red,pouting lips, was given by her mother her first cupof milk for a month from our provisions.Christina enjoyed the meal, but took it as amatter of course. But her mother
WAS
dioking withgratitude, and overwhelmed me with her blessings.CHEERED SIR THOMAS LIPTON.I explained to Mr. Maclean that
The DailyMirror
had only been able to achieve its missionof mercy through the generosity of Sir ThortiasLipton, siipplemerited by the kind contributions ofMessrs. Spiers-and Pond, Mr. Eugen Sandow, themanager of the Hotel Cecil, and Sir Joseph Lyons,I showed them Sir Thomas I.ipton's photograph,and, after they had cheered it, the women, all ofwhom wore picturesque gipsy shawls, pressed thephotograph to their hearts by way of thanks.Mr. Maclean took me over the island and gaveme some idea of the extent of the distress.It would be difficult to conceive a more lonely or i' awe-inspiring spot. It is nothing more than arugged rock five miles in circumference, out ofwhich it seems absolutely impossible to wrest aliving.Practically nothing will, grow there, there ishardly any fishing, arid if it ivere not for a fewsheep which supply the islanders with a wonderful
woo!
for the famous St. Kilda tweeds th(;re- wouldbe no industry at all.Life is in its most primitive form, and the islandis one of the few remaining places where all busirness is transacted by barter and where^money isvalueless excepting once or twice a year."NOBODY WANTS HER."Unfortunately, St. Kilda is like the unlovedspinster-^nohody wants her. The island lie's onno route, and, with the, exception of an occasional trawler seeking-^belter from ..the wildAtlantic, the only visits received are from themail-boat, due eight times a year.Its last visit is in August, and there is a complete silence until the end of April.When, as in this year, the mail boat fails tocome,
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the. islanders are at, their wifs' ends fororovisions.I became overwhelmed by the haunting melancholy of the lonely island, and asked several menwhy it was that they did not leave the barren soilfor some more profitable place. In every instancethe answer was to this effect:—" How can I leave the dear island of my binth?I would rather die than, be away from the island,-'So great, however has been hunger and hardship or recent years that several of the younger menhave gone to Glasgow and elsewhere in order toseek employment, and life becomes all the harderfor the women left behind,LONG WAIT FOR LOVE LETTERS.Marian Macqueen, a beautiful girl of nineteen,blushingly explained to me how hard it is for awoman when she has to wait seven months for aletter from her lover.It is not that they fear that the lover's heart willstray—for St, Kilda men will only marry women oftheir island, , ,But. the long northern nights, when it is quitelight after ten, stir the Celtic imagination, and thewomen while, knitting just think and think andthink, and their great eyes sadden as they look farout over the ocean waste,There are eighty-one persons on the island,and there have seldom been more or less, becausewhenever a man dies a baby is born to replacehim, and when an old lady dies, there is a girlbaby. This happens about once a year, for theannual birth^'and death rate are as follow:—Birth-rate 1Death-rate 1Annual increase 0One year recently it happened that an odd boybaby was bornand.noold gentleman went outof the world to make way for him. That is whythere is one more male on th« island than thereare females. ,Ap.art froui the joy of the people at the sightof good, solid food to last them for many weeks.there was joy in the rocky islet when we disclosedto them-^rare treasure—a packet of
Daily Mirrors
for every day since last October.I ex|ilained the Titanic disaster photographs to anold man named Macdonald, and the men reverentlytook off their hats, saying, " Poor men, and thewives left behind to cry in sorrow,"
They hung over every picture, and the ministerwas worried out ofshis life by.people who wantedtranslations of the descriptions underneath.AH the island's old-age pensioners have receivednothiiig for nine -months, the money being at Aberdeen Post Office.While' the women of St. Kilda do all the hard•manual work, such as carrying peat from the precipitous, hillside, sheep shearing, and digging, themen do the weaving and make dresses for thewomen.The result is that the garments, though the^ maybe corntortable, are decidedly unas.sthetic, the islanddressmakers not troubling about such trifles as fit orfashion,The islanders have a Parliament, each familysending one representative. The Parliament meetsoutside Donald Ferguson's house, and decides onihe next d^'s work and similar matters.Be.fore I , left I was approached by JohnMcDoriald, the precentor, who, speaking beforeParliament, asked.me to,accept a suit length ofSt, Kilda tweed to give to Sir Thomas Lipton.It was all they had, he said, but it wouLd showthat their hearts were full of gratitude. There wasa public presentation of the cloth, which I promisedto hand to Sir Thonias,.They also gave me a letter of thanks in Gaelicto
The Daily Mirror.
Translated, the letterreads:— .Dear Editor,—A thousand thanks for yourgreat kindness to the lonely St. Kildians intheir distress for the want of provisions. Yourhelp reached us unexpectedly, and left us morethan thankful for it. Could you see thoselonely people at this moment dividing the"spoil, I am sure you would not consider yourkind efforts thrown away.—I am, yours faithfully, D.
MACLEAN.
United Free Church Manse, St. Kilda.May 21, 1912.A HEALTHY COMMUNITY.One of the most
-
appreciated members of, theparty was Dr, Taylor, who was in great requestby the islanders. His report
xi
as follow^
:
"According to the account of the minister, theinhabitants are a healthy community. Inlantilemortality at one time was extremely heavy owingto the frequency of the tetanus neonatorum germ,the infection being fatal in the first week of life,This mortality is now reduced to zero," The birth and death rates are very constant,working out at one each yearly. Tuberculosis is unknown, and there is only one case of seriousillness, and that partly the result of old age. Iexpected to find strong evidence of the degeneracywhich necessarily occurs when people intermarryfor generations. :"The signs, however, are not markedly
m
evidence. Here and there I found it obvious in thecases of younger men, but the average woman iswell set up-and healthy, and by no means lacking in attractiveness." It does not appear that Kiidians are distinguished for extreme longevity."PRAYERS FOR EDITOR.The minister told me the interesting fact thatas men and women are practically equafin numbercourtship is unknown. If a couple cannot agree
thej'
have no other choice.
'1
he islanders, however, are very peaceful, fighting being unknown. Half the men are non-drinkersand non-smokers. They are still very superstitious,and one woman, talking about prehistoric remainsknown as " Fairies' House," told me she had seenfairies, who told her we were coming.On leaving we shook hands with every inhabitant and they all vowed to pray for the Editor
olThe Daily Mirror
and Sir T, Lipton for the restof 'their lives.With the summer a boat will call regularly, but
The Daily Mirror
gifts will make 1912 a wonderfulyear. Steps will be taken, however, to preventthe recurrence of starvatioii.St. Kilda is the chief island, and the only inhabited one, of a rocky group lying far out in theAtlantic, forty miles west of the north-west extremity of North Uist.It is the most ,lonely, the most remote and oneof the most remarkable spots in Great Britain,It was on Saturday that a trawler which arrivedat Aberdeen told hov^ she had touched at St. Kildaand learned of its inhabitants', desperate plight.The natives were reduced to a mere handful offlour, and had been "living" for sonie time onbirds' eggs.TO-DAY'S "WEATHER.Out special weather forecast lor to-drty Is : Variableto weaterlj breezes; cloudy afc first, with thunder andiieavy showers; fine latei; normal temperature.LiglitinB-up time; 6.34 p.m. High-water at LoiulonBridge: 7-9 p.m.LONUON OBsattVATiONs.—Uolborn Circus, Citj8 p.m.; barometer, 39.60io., unsteady; temperature58dag.; wind. S.W., justy; weather, fine to showery. 'S»a pa39!(ges will ba smooth.
SUFFRAGETTE LEADERS SENT
TO
GAOL
FOR
NINE MONTHS.
Mr. a.nd Mrs. Pethick Lawrence and Mra. Pankhurat were found guilty at the OldBailey-yeaterday of conspiracy and inciting others to commit dama'se. Theywere sentenced to nine months* Imprisonment in the second divis'ion. " MayGod defend us, as our cause is justl" exclaimed Mrs. Lawrence on being sentenced, 0) Mr. and Mrs. Pethtck Lawrence. (2) Mrs. Pankhurst.~(<' Daily Mirror "photographs.)
WOMEN
SHOUT 'SHAME'AT OLD BAILEY.
Nine Months in Second Divisionfor Suffragette Leaders.
APPEAL TO JUDGE.
Sentences of nine months' imprisonment in thosecond division were passed at the Old Bailey yesterday on Mr, and Mrs, Pethick Lawrence and
Mrs,
Pankhurst, the suffragette leaders, whose sixdays' trial on charges of conspiracy and incitementto break windows concluded with a verdict ofGuilty.Mr, Pethick Lawrence and Mrs. Pankhurst wereordered to pay the costs of the prosecution, ,Directly Mr. Justice Coleridge, in calm, judicialtones, had sentenced the defendants a wave ofpent-up passion swept the court. Women leapt totheir feet and hurled the words " Shame, shame!"at the Judge and jury.Then, when the chorus of anger had died down,•women began to file past the front of the dock, eachstopping to shake the defendants by the hand andto speak words of encouragement to them.It was the first reception tliat sentenced prisonershave ever held from the Old Bailey dock,, With smiling faces, Mrs, Pethick Lawrence and
Mrs.
Pankhufst descended to the cells, and as theywent tJie women in the gallery rose as one andshouted triumphant " Hurrahs! "Handkerchiefs were waveil, the cheers were renewed, and the cry " Kee)) the Hag Hying!" wasrepeated again and again. No attempt^ to stopthis demonstration was attempted, Mr, Keir Hardiawarmly grasped Mr. Pethick I^awrence's hand.
MRS.
PANKHURST PROTIiSTS.
Indignant protests by Mrs. Pankhurst interruptedthe Attorney-General's last words to the jury.It was Open to the defendants, he pointed out, tohave called every one of the women whom the prosecution said had been incited, and who, unfortunately for themselves, had been sentenced to termsof imprisonment.Then, he adde'd: Have you any doubt that if ithad been possible, even by straining t!ie .truth—" I object, my Lord," cried Mrs. Pankhurst,sharply. The judge inquired in soft tones thenature of the objection, and the Attorney-Generalsuggested that Mrs. Pankhurst did not understandhim.With great warmth she cried ; " Describe yourGovernment's methods towards us."STBAINING THE THLTH." Oh, Mrs. Pankhurst!" replied the Attorney-General, who proceeded to amplify his first statement.But again she protested, and the Attorney-General to soothe her said that if she thought it wasan offence to say straining the truth, he would notsay it." It is politicians who strain the truth," declared Mrs. Pankhurst excitedly, and with thisremark the incident ended,Concluding a two hours' speech, the Attorney-General said that they had heard much about thewrongs from which women were said to be sufferingat the hands of men, but the jury must rememberthat in moments of danger the balance was not allon the side of"man,
MOVING APPEAL
TO
JUDGE.
In announcing the jury's verdict of guilty, th«foreman added: "We desire to express the hopethatj takihg into consideration the undoubted puremotives which underlie the agitation which has ledto this trouble, you wil! be induced to exercise theulmost clemency and leniency."Before his Lordshin passed sentence the defeiV- -dants addressed his Lordship at considerable length,
Mrs.
Pethick Lawrence, in her closing speech, raising both hands and saying, " May God defend us,as our cause is just! "
Mrs.
Pankhurst was a pathetic figure as she clung'to the edge of the dock and pleaded to be treatedas a first-class misdemeanant."We do not seek to escape punishment," said
Mrs.
Lawrence. "It is not imprisonment wemind. It is bad enough to be shut out from theglory of the sun and the beauty of the earth." To be cut off from one's friends and to beseparated from one's husband is the very essence ofbitterness. But we do not comnkin. It is yartof the price that has to bepaid for the emancipation of women." But the question of our status is another matteraltogether. It is a question that touches ourhonour and the honour of the great movement ofwhich we are the representatives."In delivering judgment Mr, Justice Coleridgesaid : The law would sanction a sentence of twoyears' imprisonment with hard labour,If in the course of this case he had observedany contrition for, or disavowal of, the acts theyhad committed, or any hope that they would avoid.a repetition of them in the.future, he should feelvery much prevailed upon by the arguments thatthey had addressed to him."As you have openly admittei^, that you meanto continue breaking the law. to make you first-class misdemeanants would only be to put intoyour hands fresh capacities of executing tliat purpose," his Ixirdship concluded. _ ,
SECOND DIVISION PRIVILEGES.
While the second division has not all the luxuryof the first division, it is well removed from therigours of the third,Second-division prisoners do no compulsory workwith the exception of cleaning their celis.^ Theyenjoy an improved dietary, do not mix with theordinary prisoners, and are allowed many mor«facilities for communicating with their friends.

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