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What is “Marriage”?

What is “Marriage”?

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Published by A.J. MacDonald, Jr.
Definition of MARRIAGE
1
a (1) : the state of being united to a person of the opposite sex as husband or wife in a consensual and contractual relationship recognized by law (2) : the state of being united to a person of the same sex in a relationship like that of a traditional marriage

b : the mutual relation of married persons : wedlock

c : the institution whereby individuals are joined in a marriage
2
: an act of marrying or the rite by which the married status is effected; especially : the wedding ceremony and attendant festivities or formalities
3
: an intimate or close union

Source: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/marriage

“Facts about the history of Saint Valentine's Day is still shrouded in mystery. Many Christians believe that Saint Valentine was a priest in Rome during the third century and helped young couples to get married secretly despite being outlawed by Emperor Claudius. When Claudius discovered Valentine's actions, the emperor ordered his execution. Moreover, many people believe his execution was ordered for helping Christians escape the Roman prisons where they were brutally beaten.” (Source here.) 

History of Marriage
The word marriage may be taken to denote the action, contract, formality, or ceremony by which the conjugal union is formed or the union itself as an enduring condition. In this article we deal for the most part with marriage as a condition, and with its moral and social aspects. It is usually defined as the legitimate union between husband and wife. "Legitimate" indicates the...
Definition of MARRIAGE
1
a (1) : the state of being united to a person of the opposite sex as husband or wife in a consensual and contractual relationship recognized by law (2) : the state of being united to a person of the same sex in a relationship like that of a traditional marriage

b : the mutual relation of married persons : wedlock

c : the institution whereby individuals are joined in a marriage
2
: an act of marrying or the rite by which the married status is effected; especially : the wedding ceremony and attendant festivities or formalities
3
: an intimate or close union

Source: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/marriage

“Facts about the history of Saint Valentine's Day is still shrouded in mystery. Many Christians believe that Saint Valentine was a priest in Rome during the third century and helped young couples to get married secretly despite being outlawed by Emperor Claudius. When Claudius discovered Valentine's actions, the emperor ordered his execution. Moreover, many people believe his execution was ordered for helping Christians escape the Roman prisons where they were brutally beaten.” (Source here.) 

History of Marriage
The word marriage may be taken to denote the action, contract, formality, or ceremony by which the conjugal union is formed or the union itself as an enduring condition. In this article we deal for the most part with marriage as a condition, and with its moral and social aspects. It is usually defined as the legitimate union between husband and wife. "Legitimate" indicates the...

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Categories:Types, Research, Law
Published by: A.J. MacDonald, Jr. on Feb 14, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/13/2014

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mar
·
riage
 
noun
 
ˈ
mer-ij,
ˈ
ma-rij\ 
Definition of MARRIAGE
1a
(1)
:
the state of being united to a person of theopposite sex as husband or wife in a consensual andcontractual relationship recognized by law (2)
:
thestate of being united to a person of the same sex in arelationship like that of a traditional marriage <same-sex
marriage
>
b
 
:
the mutualrelationof marriedpersons
:
 
wedlock
c
 
:
2:
an act of marryingor the rite by which the married status iseffected;
especially 
 
:
the wedding ceremony and attendant festivities orformalities
3:
an intimate or close union <the
marriage
of painting and poetry — J. T. Shawcross>
Source:http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/marriage
“Facts about the hi story of 
aint Valentin e's Day 
is stil l shrouded in mystery. Many Christians believe that 
Saint Valentine was a priest in Rome during the third century and 
 
helped 
 
young couples to get married secretly despite being outlawed 
 
by Emperor Claudius 
.
When Claudius discovered Valentine's actions, the emperor ordered his execution 
. Moreover, many people believe his execution was ordered for helping Christians escape the Roman prisons where they were brutally beaten.” 
(Source
here 
.)
 
History of Marriage
The word
marriage
may be taken to denote the action, contract, formality, orceremonyby which the conjugal union is formed or the union itself as anenduring condition. In this article we deal for the most part with marriage asa condition, and with its moral and social aspects. It is usually defined as thelegitimate union between husband and wife. "Legitimate" indicates the
What is “Marriage”? 
 
sanction of some kind of law, natural, evangelical, or civil, while the phrase,"husband and wife", implies mutualrightsof sexual intercourse, life incommon, and an enduring union. The last two characters distinguishmarriage, respectively, fromconcubinageand fornication. The definition,however, is broad enough to comprehend polygamous and polyandrousunions when they are permitted by thecivil law; for in such relationshipsthere are as many marriages as there areindividualsof the numericallylarger sex. Whether promiscuity, the condition in which all the men of agroup maintain relations and live indiscriminately with all thewomen, can beproperly called marriage, may well bedoubted. In such a relationcohabitation and domestic life are devoid of that exclusiveness which iscommonly associated with theideaof conjugal union.
The theory of primitive promiscuity
All authorities agree that during historical times promiscuity has been eithernon-existent or confined to a few small groups. Did it prevail to any extentduring the prehistoric period of the race? Writing between 1860 and 1890, aconsiderable number of anthropologists, such as Bachofen, Morgan,McLennan, Lubbock, and Giraud-Teulon, maintained that this was the originalrelationship between the sexes among practically all peoples. So rapidly didthe theory win favour that in 1891 it was, according to Westermarck,"treated by many writers as a demonstratedtruth" (History of HumanMarriage, p. 51). It appealed strongly to those believers in organic evolutionwho assumed that the social customs of primitive man, including sexrelations, must have differed but slightly from the corresponding usagesamong the brutes. It has been eagerly adopted by the Marxian Socialists, onaccount of its agreement with their theories of primitive commonproperty and of economicdeterminism. According to the latter hypothesis, all othersocial institutions are, and have ever been, determined by the underlyingeconomicinstitutions; hence intheoriginal condition of commonproperty, wives and husbands must likewisehave been held in common (see Engles,"The Origin of the Family, Private Property, and the State", tr. from German,Chicago, 1902). Indeed, the vogue which the theory of promiscuity for atime enjoyed seems to have been due far more to a priori considerations of the kind just mentioned, and to the wish tobelievein it, than to positiveevidence.About the only direct testimony in its favour is found in the fragmentarystatements of some ancientwriters, suchas Herodotus and Strabo,concerning a few unimportant peoples, and in the accounts of some moderntravellers regarding some uncivilizedtribes of the present day. Neither of 
What is “Marriage”? 
 
these classes of testimony clearly shows that the peoples to which they referpractised promiscuity, and both are entirely too few to justify thegeneralization that all peoples lived originally in the conditions which theydescribe. As for the indirect evidence in favour of the theory, consisting of inferences from such social customs as the tracing of kinship through themother, religious prostitution, unrestrained sexual intercourse previous tomarriageamong some savage peoples, and primitive community of goods,none of these conditions can beprovedto have been universal at any stageof human development, and every one of them can be explained more easilyand more naturally on other grounds than on the assumption of promiscuity.We may say that the positive arguments in favour of the theory of primitivepromiscuity seem insufficient to give it any degree of probability, while thebiological,economic,psychological, andhistorical arguments brought against it by many recentwriters, e.g. Westermarck (op. cit., iv-vi) seemto render it unworthy of serious consideration. The attitude of contemporaryscholars isthus described by Howard: "The researches of several recent writers, notablythose of Starcke and Westermarck, confirming in part and further developingthe earlier conclusions of Darwin and Spencer, have established a probabilitythat marriage or pairing between one man and onewoman, though theunion be often transitory and the rule frequently violated, is the typical formof sexual union from the infancy of thehuman race" (History of MatrimonialInstitutions, I, pp. 90, 91).
Polyandry and polygamy
One deviation from the typical form of secular union which, however, is alsocalled marriage, is polyandry, the union of several husbands with one wife. Ithas been practised at various times by a considerable number of people ortribes. It existed among the ancient Britons, the primitiveArabs, theinhabitants of theCanary Islands, the Aborigines of America, theHottentots, the inhabitants of India,Ceylon,Thibet,Malabar, and New Zealand. In the great majority of these instances polyandry was the exceptional form of conjugal union. Monogamy and evenpolygamywere much more prevalent.The greater number of the polyandrous unions seem to have been of thekind called fraternal; that is the husbands in each conjugal group were allbrothers. Frequently, if not generally, the first husband enjoyed conjugal anddomesticrightssuperior to the others, was, in fact, the chief husband. Theothers were husbands only in a secondary and limited sense. Both thesecircumstances show that even in the comparatively few cases in whichpolyandry existed it was softened in the direction of monogamy; for the wifebelonged not to several entirely independent men, but to a group united bythe closest ties of blood; she was married to onefamilyrather than to one
What is “Marriage”? 

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