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DMir_1912_04!26!001-8 Mortos Na Mesma Familia

DMir_1912_04!26!001-8 Mortos Na Mesma Familia

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>
The Dai
irror
HE MORNING JOURNAL WITH THE SECOND LARGEST NET SALE,
No.
2,654
:.t«^jug^.d.
FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1912
One Halfpenny.
:?r5aiu .ufeiiw^,, >
;fOi.
a* «
:sc
FAMILY
OF
EIGHT,
WHO
WERE
ON THE
TITANIC
BY
CHANCE,' ALL DROWNED
IN
THE DISASTER BECAUSE THERE WERE
NOT
ENOUGH LIFEBOATS.
i
Of the many sad cases of the Titanic disaster, few are more tragic than that ofthe Goodwins, of Kensington, all of whom were drowned. The family consistedof father, mother and six children, and it was only by chance that they were on the, Titanic. They originally intended to sail during Easter week, but waited for theNew York on account of the coal strike. At the last minute, however, they weretransferred to the ill-starred liner. They were on their way to join Mr. Goodwin's brother at Niagara, where they intended to settle. (1) Mr. and Mrs. Goodwin and five of their children. (2) Sidney, the baby, aged eighteen months. (3)Mme. Navratil, of Nice, with her two children, who are believed to be Louisand Lolo, the French boys who were rescued. Mme. Navratil is certain they arehers, because of a number of coincidences she has noted. She is divorced from herhusband, who took the children away.
 
Page
2
'Advertisers' Annouftcemenis.
THE'
DAILY MIRROR
'Advertisers* Aftnouncemenh,
April
26, 1912
The conditions
are
simple,
the
children will find pleasure
in the
fask—and there
are an
unlimited number
of
prizes. Those specially selected
for the
youngsters include
:
FOR
THE
BOYS:
Steam
Engines, Trains, Soldiers,
Magic
Lan
terns,
Carpentry
Tools,
Fretwork
Outfits.
FOR
THE
GIRLS:
Dolls,
Doll's
Houses,
Doll's
Mallcarts,
Doll's
Bedsteads,
Girl's Sewing
Machines, etc.,
etc.
m ADDITION THERE
IS
^SOO
LAtblly
and
thousands
of
other
prizes.
Write to-day
for
furiy illustrated prize
Hat
or
ask
your dealer
for
a
copy.
CLOSING
DAY,
JULY
1st. 1912.
To obtiiin
a
(.(iTid'in,
R
l>ri7,e chosen,HOW
TO
OSTAiN
A
PRIZE.pri^e Bene!
any
of
flie followina, carrlaSo paid,
bv
July
Ist,
J913,
to
Ralmeg
and
Co, Ltd., How,See that voiir -lame and address, Dlaliily written, together Wilh ilie number
In our
prize list
of the
ure enclosi'd
in
tvery paicel,Lids (marked "Made
In
England") taken from
2d.
4d. ]/-and 2/-tins
of
Globe Paste Metal Polifih and from-Jid. tliiR
of
Globin Shoe Polish.
{Lids from
Id.
tins
c/
Globe
or
Qlohin
not
ttcoepted)
SoreW-Caos (afamued
2d. 6d.
l/-
etc.) from
all
siies Globe Liquid Melai Polish.Coupons attached
(o 6d. and i/-
packets Oloba Plate Powder and printedon
Id.
arid
2d.
packets "Golden Palm"liiikinti PowderSpeolal Notice.
In
connection withlast year's prize Bclicme. coupons wereplaced inside the Globe i'asle tine,
and iit-
t;iched
to the
bottom
of
GlobeLiquid cans.
If you
bny
a tin or
can beani;tS
a
counon,
^end
lliocoiip'>n and not
Xhe
Hd or Brrew-cai).Lids
not
bcftrinS
the
words
'
Made
hi
England"
or
screw-taps
not
stamped with
the
price will
not
be
accepted.
Raimes
& Co.
Ltd., Bow,London,E).
Its
perfect digestibility
and
absolutepurity make
it as
valuable
in
summer
as in
winter—a
strength-
maker
for all
people
in all
seasons
TRADE MARK
EMULSION
THE
ONLY FOOD TONIC WITH
A
37
YEARS'
REPUTATION
-^FOR THROAT,
BLOOD
ANp
ALL
NERVE WEAKNESSES
Recommended
by
doctors
everywhere.
A
source
of
strength
to
consumptives
and all
weakened
by illness,
overwork
or
disease.
INSIST
on
Genuine SCOTT'SEmulsion
and 866 the "
Ashman"
trade
mark.
tTv^a Qnn«ml0* Send
(or
free sample bottle—encloserree Qamiilie. 2d. for postal and mention ttils paper.SCOTT
St
BOWNE, Ltd.,10-ll Stonecutter St„London,E.C.L.OM)O.N
AiU
L&J-.MJ^JN
IS.
D
RUIt V
J.A
N].•;r^'"b-NIGlirr
.it
~i'.
ArtfulCollins prosi;nt!! Klaw flnd Krlangor's prodnctioii
of
GenerLil
Lew
*Valini;e's JJEN-HUR. DrLiiimtifed
by
WilliamVoung. BoK-olIicu
operj.
Malinei;s, Weds,
and
Hate,,
2.
A
lJJ-.I.I'lti.—At
8, Mr.
""Gem&e Kdwarde?Mu.'iitai Play,
jn 3
AoM,
THE
QUAKKH GIRL. MissGERTIE MILLAR.
Mr.
JOBSPH COVNK.
Mat.,
Sats.,
2.
POLJ-U llii-;.'\'ilti':.—Kvery Evening,'
-it
iM>,
TIIT'l GLAD I^IVK Prtetded, atti.15,
by
"TheTatlerfl.''Matinee, I'lvery Wednu^d.iy
and
Saturday,
at
2.15.
A
pOMKiJY. Kvery Eveiini/,'
at 8.30,
^
THE
BRAR-LEADEliS,
by R, 0.
Carton.
"
Matinee^ Evi;i-y Wedne-idny anti Saturday,
at
2.3Q.
(M<ITKKT6N.""
•" ".\lRrROTiKRTLORAINE
^
To-night,
at
8.30,
in
MAN
AND SUPERMAN,
by
Bet-
liard 8haw.
Mat.,
tjat.,
2.50,
, L^VST
5
PKRFORHANUEa.
0
AlA"S,-'-8.M,
Mr.
CKORi;]'; KDVVARDKS'
produtUdii, THE COUNT
or
LU.XEMJJOURG MusicalPl^iy. Jiliigli?!. libretto
by
HA.SIL H(JOU Miisie
by
FRAN^LKHAR. M;tl,. Siturdays,
2,30. Tel,,
Gerr.
201.
"IMJKli;
Ot-'
YORK'S.-JCvcry Kveiiing,
at
8.30,
-*-'
CHARLKS
FROiiMAN
ptcw^nf;
THE
"MIND
THE
I'ATNT" OIRI,,
by
AUTHtTR PIKEIU). Matinee EveryThur.^d^iy
and
Saturday,
at
3.30,
nAiK'rY.--j':v]>:Kv ]•:vJ':N"[,^•"G"".^l:~8TAlv^v
y^
Miisii\tl Play, Tliji; SUN'ylllNE GIRL, MATINEBEVERY eATURDAY,
at
2,
Hos-o(lke,
10.lo 10,
/;A"RRI(:K."
ARTi-lURlJOURCllTER^
y^
At
e.'ir,,
JMPllOPEH PKTKR,
by
Monrkton llotre.At
S,20,
HELEN MAI(,._M.lt., W^eds,,
finifi.,
2,30.
rAVMARKl-rr.—At'y,
"by"
ar7anKr-mc!it"'Vi7h
H
Cyril Maude, BUNTV PUI.T.S TTm STRINGS,
At
8 30
"An
0bjs;(:f,
IjoSEon." Mats,, Weds.. Thurs,, Sata.,
2.30.
H
rS""M"A[KSTY"S"."""""
"
""""" ""TO-N-I(;nT,
,11 8,
Sh.ikcspeaie's OTHRf.T.O. Othello, Hulbert
Trw;
IneolAiircnre living; IJeMlewona, riivllis Neilson-Terry!MATINEE, EVEIIY SATUHDAY^nl.
2.
LNX-SWAY.—8,;!0.""FANNY'S FfR"ST""i^LAy?
" Bernard Sbaw
at
hia
bi^t." Mata.. Weds., Sats.,
2.30,T YC]i:;UM—MO.\'"k:
AND
rairW0MAN7~R"c"
-1-^
markable
New
Rojnnntlo Piiiy,
by
Fveilk. Mc^lville.Nitjlitiy,
nt
T.JS. Mnls,,
Wed.
and_8!U^2^t)
Gr-.rt.
7617
K
T.VRIC.
NlGHfmkD.S^fDie Fie derma
us).'KVKNjNGS,
kt
a.3Q.
Matinee. UKLlS^;__nt
2
30
XTEW.
SWRJLT NKLT.
OF OLD
DRURV:
il .TULIA NEiraON anti FRED TF.RRY. TO-NIGnfdt
8.15. Mat., Wed. and
Siit.,
2.30.
LAST
2
WEEKS
pRINCF
OF
WALK.S.--To.nigh(,
at" 9.
Ms's
J- MARTK TEMFES'I- prodnep,!!
AT
THE
RARN.
At
C.20,
"The
Workhonso W.trd." MatR.. WcclB.
and
S.its.,
2.30
P
R1NCE'.S THEATRE, Shafle'^bury-iiv.,
W C
_ NiKhtW, 7.45. Mats,. Wed., firtt.
2.30.
Very Reniarka'bIaPlay,
by G.
Carlton W:>llace, THE APPLE
OF
KDEN
Pro-
diii'fd
by
Witlter
and
Fredk, Meivllifi. GeiT. 5,983.
'
Q
U]':EN'S.--Mis.'s Snrah Brooke's Season. Kverv,„ n,^'*"'^."*''
'^^
^^^"' '^"P'
EASIKST
WAY,
by
KuEenaWalter, Mfttineo, Evar?
Sat,
at
2.IS.
Cox-Ofllee
10 to lO
'nOYALTY.
" ^ ^
_,TO:NIGHTTKr8.30"i
I*- Vedrcnno
and
Eadio prosflJitJffi^^^^'^^^,;,*'^ Arnold Bennett
and
Edward KnoMaurli.M_ATINEES_, i-HUaSDAVB
and
SATUHDAY.g.
at 2
30
^ED'RKNNE-EADIE Sii^mTMafniei^r» TO-DAY, ftfc
3,
anil lOvory Tuesday
and
FrMavTHEJ)Dn jfAN^OI^b_y Hftr'oId_Br|^^^
QT.
JAMES'. To-nigiit,
at
SJS,
a
new
nlay,^^ BELLA DOI^NA.
^
GEORGE ALEXANDER
and
Mrs. PATRICK CAMPBELLfv.atmce, Kvery Wednesday
and
Baturday,
at 2CCALA THEATRE.
KINEMXCOEOK".
K.-,™ TWIOR DAILY,
2.30
and
8 0.
WITH
OUR
KING
AND
QUEEN THROTIGn INDIA
T6-NK)HT.
Bpowal P(.rtOrmar.cein
aid Of
TITANIC DISASTER FUND.
LONDON
AMUSEMENTS.
17AUDj':VILIJ':.
~
Charles Ktnyon presentsV Nightly,
at
830 Mats., Wed.
and
Sat.,
3.
IlUTHEa-
FORD AND aON,
by K. G.
Soworby.
Tel..
Gerr.
5,315It will
pay you to
carefully consider
our
proposal beforedeciding
who is to
make your
next
Suit. fJow-a-dayaappearance counts
for a
good deal,
And if a man is to
keephis position
and
make
the
moat
of his
opportunities,
he
must
do
justice
to his
appearance
and 'put the
best sideoutwards.'
The
Graves Suit
at
$^l~
is the
greatestpopular priced tailoring success which
the
clothing tradehas tooffer
; for
Style, Quality
and
Value
it
leads
the way,
and
by
taking advantage
of our
wonderfully easy terms,you
may
have your
new
suit delivered
at
once,
and
arrange
the
payment
to
suit your convenience.
Our
remarkable high-grade suit offer
is
backed
up by the
mostperfect
and
up-to-date clothing organisation
in
existence,and complete satisfaction
is
guaranteed
to
every customer.
WE DELIVER your Sult from the material
of
your own choice,stylishly cut, lalloied,
and
caicfuily Diadn exactly
to
your own ineasnies,
W
YNDHAMS.—To-niwlit,
at
8'iO, OiaiAI.D
dn
MAUKIER
and
Oo.
in a
New Comedyp '• JELP'S,"by Jtorace Anno.iley VftKhull. Matineo, Weds., Sata., fl.'lO,
A
LifAMIiKA.—(irand Bnllet, CARMEN,
O.-W.
DIVA AIDA, KAUFMANN'8 BEAUTIFY. EveninBs,
8,
MONDAY NEXT, MISS MAGGIE TEYTE.
H
Un'ODROME (LONDONJ.-Daily,
at 2.30
and
a.
MELLA MARS, Kri.ALINB TEIIIUBS and Co.,OROHEaTRA FMMINA,
E,
GAROKNA,
TOM
JACK,
etc,
3s,
to
«1
4B,
6G0 Get,
P
ALACE.—(Saisoti Russc) ANNA RAVEOVA,
ANTONNET
and
GROOK, BARCLAY GAMMON,ARTHUR PRINCE. (Si^ecial Pavlova
M^t.
Every
Wed.,
at
31,
KvKg.
8-
MAT.
(Redureil J'rjm),
SAT-,
at 2,
P
ALLADIUM—fi."2(j; 0."io,"Moii.,Wed,, Sat,, 2.30.
0.20,
S,10,
BEECHAM OPERA
GO,
prcsciitlne
THE
TAIdt;» 6F HOFFMANN. GEO. GRAVES
and
CO., GJCO.ROREV.BTlJ.V MERSON, GLARK and HAMILTON. FRED
EMNJ'^V
;rnd
CO., BERT GILBERT,
pto.
Prices,
6?.
to
6d,
\
t''
\r%l
?'•>
a.1
4
* * «
h
\^
A
t «,
\
=
'vJ*
^
'**
JL
%
and
if
yoii
are in
every respect entirely pleased with
the
eiilt whendelivered
and
tried
on at
horn*,
the
balanto
is
payable
by six
monfliiy paymcnta
of B/- Bnt If
you
aro in any
way
disappointedwlih
the
work,
you arc
under
iio
oHMafioil whatever
to
keepthe eult,
and
vlt
will immcdiateiy return
iho
whole
of
the
motiey paid,IT COSTS NOTHING
to
(est
the sincerity
of
our
offer. Writea Post Ciifd to-day
for
patterns
of
the
Graves
35/-
Suit,
and
you
willreceive
per
return
the
ftnest display
of
materials ever suiimitlcd
at the
price.
Tha
cloths
wa
shall sainple will
be
cuttings ffom
the
lenfllhsnow being made
up,
Incliidiiis TWHRUS. CmcvioTS,
WOUSTKU SEHGEB.PLAID JILACK AND BLUK VICUKAS,
and
a
splendid leading line
in
hardweariiitf YOKKaHiHK SurriNGS. When you coma
to
examine the patternsyou will
be
alnick
by the
fact that although
35/-
is
admittedly
an
economical priccfor
a
good suit,
yet
all
fbe
patterns we snbndt
are
tasteful,superior designs,
&
sueli
as
you notice
in
the most expensive West End suits.
WHEREVER
YOU
LIVE
you may
take adx-antage
ol
our favourable prlceK
and
equitable easy payment ferniB,
and
every readerwlio
is
alive
to bis own
Interests sbould send
a
Post Card immedistely.for
our
unrltailed display
of
suiting! samples
at
3Si-
and
i42/-
postfree
per
return. Everything carriage paid
to all
approved ordei*
(or
Email deposit with order
and
easy monthly payments through
the
postafter goods are received
and
considered quite satisfactory,
Say
-whelfaeVyou prefer LI||bt
or
Dath valtems.
21-
In
tho
S
Cash Discount.PRYSTAL PAT.AC}-;.
Eairy Archipckfto;
'-J
Great Water (Jliut-i:; Ginr;ma)oKrni)h. Kkatin^: Rink,
3
Siisslons. OrBan
etc.
Hsf,..
(Jrimd Itohcniian '•oneort
by
tlin(^P. Orohestral Sy,
at
8.
Return fare ftud aiiinitsion,
Is, 6d.
M
ASKEl'.YNK
'k
"DICVA'NT'S
MY.STERIJ'l'S
-^
Bt Geoi-sea JTalL-Daily,
iit 3 and 8, Mr.
DAVr$OMVANT,
etu.
Performnrieo
on
Fridiiy niRlit will
bO
foe
the benefit
of
Titnnio tufltrcrs. Bpecial altraetloas.T ONDON
AKR"01")K0ME,
imNDON,
N.W.—
Jj 8F.00Nn RPRfNG Mi'Ll'/TlNG, TO-MCllUOW (Sul.l,3 p.m. Fiying Daily (Snnday.s indnded), wcatln:r pcrmittlne.AdmLsfion
6d., Is.. 2s. 6d^
E;i..:y iiei-(!S3 from
all
parts.
_
PERSONAL.
K.
8. t<i
Chelmsford.-Do please eeud
;in
address
to
FciateR^stantc, Ilarruwato.£2 REWARD.—loBt
on
Wednciday afternoon,
On
road,motoring between Fnriihftm
and
Guildford, Ijxdy's mauvodressing ooso, marked
F. V.
IT.,
finntiiining
elam
bottlesof
no
value
to
fmdcr,
but
reward would
bo
paid
(Or
returnwith coiitenffl
to
07,
Bumner-street, Bouthwaik.
HB.
EXHIBITIONS.
DAILY MAIL
TDEAL TTOME
TgXniBITlOV,
Daily,
lo
April
30. U-IL
THE
MOST BI'UUTIFUL
AND
INSTRUCTIVJC DISPLAY EVERSEEN
IN
LONDON.
TDEAL tJOME
"gXIIIBmON.
ALYMPIA,
Kensington, W.
AdnitselOn, One Shilling; Obildron Blspence.
MISCELUANBOUS.
C
ORNS banished: acts llko
a
charm; easily applied! prico7d.—Needham's,
297,
Edgware-l-d,
W.
DEAFNESa.—Gcntleman, cured
himself,
v.'l!l send pwtl-culars
of
remedy free.—A. Olifton, 151, Strand, London,DRUNKARDS. Cured nuieklyj secretly: cost triflingjfree.—Carlton Ohemical
Co.. 623
BlrmlnBhain.1?1T8 Cured
by
Trench's Remedy; (Inipla homo Irealmentitwenty-five years' >ne«e6E;
1,000
teBtimoninla
In on*
Tonri pamphlet free.—I'tench's Remedies.
Ltd.,
BflO, BolltHFrederick-^t, l)ui4in.
 
April 26, 1912 THE DAILY MIRROR Page 3
OLYMPIC'S ALL-DAY WAIT FOR FIREMEN
Liner Still Held Up Off RydeBut May Sail To-day.
BOAT TESTS.
One
Collapsible
Out
of the FourTried Found Leaking.
OTMKERS' DEMANDS.
Will Not Sail Unless EighteenLoyal Men Are Dismissed.
The Olympic was still lying off Ryde and unableto proceed on her voyage to New York at an earlyhour this morniny, the difficulty arising out of thefiremen's refusal lo sail not yet having been overcome.At the same time, it is hoped lo get the lineraway at eight o'clock this morning. A hundredfiremen arrived from Portsmouth late last nightand the remainder necessary were expected at2 a.m. from Liverpool.Nearly 300 firemen, trimmers, greasers andothers, it will be recalled, left the liner on Wednesday, live minutes before she was due to sail,alleging as reason for their action that there wereinsufficient seamen on board to man the lifeboats,nd that the collapsible boats were unseaworlhy.A new difficulty arose yesterday. The Seamen'sUnion demanded that the eighteen firemen who remained on board on Wednesday should be dismissed. The White Star Company, however,firmly refused to agree to this.During the day a deputation of firemen proceededin a tug to the Olympic and witnessed tests of theliner's collapsible boats, which decided them to advise the men to return to work as soon as a new
collapsible boat was put on board iii place ot onefound faulty. ^ ,
When the delegates returned to Southampton,however, they found that the men, who had gonehome, said they would not sail in the ship, nomatter what the result of the boat demonstrationmight be, unless those who had remained on theship on Wednesday were taken off.
WILL
SAIL
ON ONE
CONDITION.
<From Our Special Correspondent.)
COWES, April 25.—Mr. Curry, the manager forthe White Star Company at Southampton, afterhis brief visit to Southampton this evening madethe following statement to me ;—"The position is briefly as follows, he said."The imion officials, who came down on thetug together with nine firemen appointed by theother men as delegates, saw the demonstration ofthe boats. , , . ," Four Berthon boats were lowered into thewater, manned, and rowed round entirely to thesatisfaction of the union officials and delegates,with the exception of one boat only, which, afterit had been in the water for two hours, was leaking a little, presumably having been slightlydamaged in the course of being launched.
_
"Arrangements were made with the union officials and the delegates that they would immediately return to Southampton and urge the menwho left the ship yesterday and were standing byfor orders from the union immediately to returnto the ship, provided we put on board one otherboat in the place of the one that had got damaged.This we agreed to do." But on the arrival of the tug at Southampton itwas found that the men "had all gone away, and thatbefore leaving had said that they would not sail inthe ship, no matter what the result of the boatdemonstration might be, unless the men who hadremained on the ship yesterday were taken off.""This the White Star Tine clid not see their wayto comply with.Messrs. Lewis and Cannon, the president andthe secretary of the Seafarers' Union, told methat they were going to try to persuade the mento go to the ship.The men had <!ispersed at 5 p.m., tired out afterpicketing all night and waiting about al.1 flay, andare likely to adhere to their arrangement not tomeet outside the White Star office to-morrow morning before seven o'clock.
FEELING AGAINST COUAPSIBIES.
The feeling against collapsible boats here is verystrong. All kinds of seamen have told me they aredifficult to open, and, indeed, that it is impossiblefor any but seamen thoroughly practised to getthem open at all in bad weather."The material sticks," said a harbour look-outman to me, " and I remember a test when thirtyof us could not haul the boat apart in half an hour,and had to get tackles to pull it open. And whenat last it was got into shape the canvas split allalong one side." Sharp rock or a piece of ice would cut thecanvas like a knife, and they are always liable tooverturn till an evenly distributed dead weight ofpassengers is in them."
DELEGATES TEST THE COLLAPSIBLES
Mr. Lewis, president of the Seafarers' Union,described the visit of the firemen's delegates tothe Olympic as follows;—"The firemen of the Olympic met at seventhis morning. About eight o'clock Mr, Blake,the superintendent engineer of the White StarCompany, said the company were agreeable to aninspection of the Olympic's lifeboats if the menwould appoint a deputation."Nine men, together with Mr. Cannon, secretary of the union, and
myself,
proceeded in a'tugto the Olympic. We were not received on board,but Captain Haddock intimated that he was waiting instructions from Liverpool."Just after two o'clock the captain sent formyself and Cannon, and agreed to the delegatesinspecting any four collapsible boats they caredto select." We picked four out and they were toweredinto the water. After the^v had remained in thesea three hours we again inspected them." We found that three of them were seaworthy.The other had a hole in the bottom and was foundto be leaking badly."At this point Mr. Cannon intervened and saidthe footboards were awash, and the outer andinner skins had swollen with water.Mr. Lewis, proceeding, said that the attentionof Commander Clarke was drawn to the boat'scondition. Some of the sailors and the delegatesd^ecided that it was unseaworthy, and he and Mr.Cannon fold the captain they were prepared lorecommend the men to return to work, subject tothe unseaworlhy boat being replaced.
ONLY
ONE
GRUiMBLERI
(From Our Special Correspondent.)
ONBOARD
THE OLVMPtc, April 25.—The passengers on board are taking the situation verycalmly and philosophically. They laugh and jokeabout it, and appear to be bent on making the bestof a bad job.They spend a lot of time in the gymnasium,ridmg horses and indulging in physical drill. Eldermembers are going in lor breathing exercises.There aie no newspapers on board.'fhe delay, however, is having serious consequences in many cases.One American passenger said to me : " If I donot make Minneapolis by Sunday week I shall lose^10,000."A lady and gentlemen who are on their honeymoon trip had made arrangements for a big housereception when they got back to the States, butall their arrangements have been upset, and thereception will have to be cancelled,ihe only grumbli^r on board is a passenger whospends most of his time walking up and down theneck in a state of furious indignation. He keepstrying to speak to the captain, and failing that hasto be content with promenading the deck, complaining of the delay and railing at fate.He has been advised by friendly passenget^ toaddress his complaints to the Firemen's Union!
SENATOR SMITH'S CAREER.
Senator William Alden Smith, who is conriuctingthe Titanic Senatorial Inquiry, was born at Pow-agiac, Mich,, in 1859—and is therefore fifty-threeyears of age.He has had a meteoric career, having started lifeas a newsboy and messenger in the employ ofthe Western Union Telegraph office. He had, asthe American phrase goes, a '"common school"education.Studying law in his spare time, Mr, Smith wasadmitted to the Bar in 1883 and since that timehas been practising at Grana Kapids, Michigan.After taking an active part in public affairs, hewas elected United States Senator (Republican) inJanuary, 1907, for the term 1907-1^13,(Photograph on page 9,)
SEIVATOR SMITH ANI) HIS COMMITTEE.
TO-DAY S "WEATHER.
Our special weather lorei::a.st lor to-day is ; Light ormoderate north-eaatecly ijroeKOs; fine geiiorally, teassiiTiiiy than ol late in many plat'os; rathor warm.Lightiiig-up timu, 8.12 p.m, High-water at LondonBrMye, 9.13 a.m.
LONDON OUSBRVATIONS.
Holborn Clcoiis, City,6 p,m.: Barometiir. 30.16in., unsteady; temperature,59(Iug,; wind, N,E,, light; weather, fine nnd sunny.Sea passages will be smooth to moderata.
Outvoted by Colleagues Annoyedby His Methods.
SHORTENING INQUIRY.
Mr. Marconi on Messages
to
Operators
to Keep
Silence.
PICKED LP BY WARSHIP.
" Short cut " metJiods are to be adopted by the
U.S.
Senate Commission inquiring into theTitanic disaster.Each member of the Commission, it is announced, will separately examine batches of tlieTitanic crew in private, and decide how many ofthem it wiii be necessary to require to give evidence in public before the whole Commission.The two witnesses yesterday, Mr. Marconi andMr, Cottam, the wireless operator of the Car-pathia, indicated why information as
_
to thedisaster was not forthcoming until the Cunarderdocked in New York.
SENATOR SMITH OVERRULED.
WASHINGTON,
April 2o,—The internal dissensionwhich has been brewing for some time in theSenate's Committee became evident to-day.From the first several members of the Committeehave lelt that the chairman. Senator Smith, hadbeen engineering the business
ot
the Committeewithout consultation with the other members.Some of tlie members resented his plan of holdingall the forty principal witnesses at Wa'shington untiithe cross-examination of all had been completed.Trouble has been particularly aroused by the holding of the Titanic's crew.Mr. Ismay has repeatedly requested to be allowedto conclude his evidence and to depart for England.Mr. Franklin has also asked for permission toreturn to New York, if only for a few days.Senator Smith stood out againstthe.serequests.
Senators Bitrton and Bourne have indicated their
disapproval of the chairman's methods frequentlyby breaking into his cross-examination.These members now intend that the hearing ofthe Titanic's officers and crew shall be taken atthe earliest possible moment, so as to permit oftheir return to England.Thi.s concession foUoweii Senator Smith's defeaton a vote on the question of keeping (QuartermasterHilchens. The Committee overruled SenatorSmith, and released the qaartermaster.
"SHORT CUT" METHODS.
At the end of the session it was formally an-ncnmced that it had been decided to adopt "short.cut " methods to conclude tlie hearing of eyi<lence.Just before the adjournment Senator Smith roseand said : " Some rumours have reached me that there isfriction and lack of harmony among the membersof the sub-committee. 1 have the concurrence olmy associates in saying that that statement is abso-Uitely untrue. Fersoaally, I have never heard ofthe slightest friction."After the adjournment of (he committee, SenatorNewlands, in an interview, explained the committee's decision.'" We have determineil," he said, " to hear themembers of the crew of the Titanic, and becauseot the large numbers ot these men we will proceedwith the hearing without the attendanie of thepublic. Each member of the cimimittcc will examine his quota of these men."—Renter's Special
MR MARCONI GIVES EVIDENCE.
WASIHN'GTON,
April 25.—The Senatorial inquiryinto ihe Titanic disaster was resumed to-day. Mr.Marconi was the first witness.He was questioned (says a Renter's special telegram) regarding a message sent from New York
An old-fa.shioned brooch and a. pin which have been forwarded by
a.
lady forsate on behalf of "The DailyMali"TIta-nic Fund,
lo the wireless operators on the Carpathia, askingthem to hold the news when they reached port for'' four figures.""Yes," said Mr. Marconi, " tnat message wassent by Mr, Sammis (chief engineer of the Marconi system). 1 knew nothing about it until afterwards. It wasn't sent until she had passed Sandy-Hook and was nearing port.Senator Smith : How far can tlie station at CapeRace maintain communication with a vessel?^Between four and hve hundred miles in the day, andconsiderably over 1,000 miles at night.There is no alarm signal on (he instruments nowto attract attention .'--No, but I may possibly devise
one,
Unless the operator sat constantly with the receiver on his head he would not get a signal. Ifwireless was to be <if service to others in distressships shoulii.havc operators i ontiniiously on duty.Operators' pay in i'.ngland averageil from 17s.to 50s. a week, with board and lodging,Asked if he had any commuiucalion with Capeliace on Sunday or any day up to the arrival ofthe Carpathia, Mr. Marconi made the followingstatement
:
" I had no direct communication. I telephonedmy office fre(juenlly on both days, and urged thatevery means should be tried to get information," I learned between 7.30 and 8 o'clock on Monday evening that the Titanic had sunk and ofthe resciics made by the Carpalhia, and asked forfurther information." I was told by my operator that it would prob-ably be impossible lo gel any, as the Carjiathiawas extremely busy with messages from thecaptain and the passengers on board.CONGRATULATED MH,
BIIIDE.
" On boarding the Car])alhia after she dockedI went directly ti> the wireless room and con-gratulatcdMr. Uride on what he had done."Mr.
C
oltam, liie Car|iat Ida's operator, wasnot there. He telejdioncd me later, and askedwhether he might give out a rcjiorl of ihe wreck.I told him he might under the circumstances." There is an ironclad rule of the companyprohibiting operators from acting as reporters."This is probably why no reports of the disaster were forthcoming from the Carpathia on herway to New York."Mr, Marconi denied sending a message askingMr. Coltam to meet him and Mr. Samniis ai anhotel and telling him to kt:e|) his month shut.Senator Smith then proceeded lo read the following wireless messages j)icked uii by ihe UnitedStates baltleship Florida:™8.(2 p.m.—Oporatur Cdtimthia. Say, old mnn, Marconi Ciiliipany takiiia goixl
ciirv
yiai kiii^p niouth shut.It's fixed yon gtt good monny du best i^tcar.8.30 p.m.---0[itratrirs Oatpiilliia, Titaaii; arraiigoilyour exolusivi! story dollara tiiur flKmca, Mari^onlHKroBiiig 6ay notliiiiK iiiitii SI^B me. Where aio yoii
now;—.1.
M. Sammis,9 p.m.- I'rom H^a fiatu to Cntpa'hia. (lo StrandHotol Wi-3t lath-strtict SCO IWan-oiii " f\"9.30 p,m,—Sea Guto
U>
Carpithia. PiTion:il tfl operntocCarpaliiia.
Met-t
Mari'oiii and SiUiiinis S02, West 14th-stroet koiip mouth phut.—Signed IMarconi." I never authorised those messages," said Mr.Marconi, "but 1 consented to the operators receiving money."Mr, iStarconi did not think that the privilege hegave Mr. Cottam had anything lo do with hisfailure lo get information, depriving the public ofdetails.Mr, Marconi repeateilly insisted that he did notsuppress details of the disaster. The C'arpathia'soperator had told him that no message was everreceived from the warship Chester ;isking for information for Mr. Taft, If it had been he wouldcertainly have answered it," When f told the operator to take something forthe story 1 nieant that the newspaper reporter.*would be so interested in wliat he had to say thatwithout ills iKdding back any general information,they would be willing to [liiy iiim for his personalexperiences."
lTANiC'S WIRELESS CALL.
Mr. Cotlam. the operalor on ihe Carpathia, recalled, repe.i.^ted the slatemenls made by him inNew York regarding the Titanic's signals.The first message from the Titanic was " Comeat once, have siruck a berg. This Cf.bl)." Heassisted the Titanic ""to communicate with othershii)s, the Til aide oi)eralor saying that escapingsteam on boani was iiueifering with hisTnstru-nients. He tohl how he got into touch with theOlympic, Calilornian, Hcllig Olav, IJaltic, MountTcniplc, and others.Did you know that the message was from theI'resident?—No. It was only signed by the commander of tlie (.'hester. He asked once aboutMajor Unit.Is there any rivalry or enmity between Marconioperators and those of olhei systems ?—There issome [eeling.Did any feeling exist between the operators onthe Titanic and the one on the I''rankliirlj wiio didn{)t reply |)romplly lo the Titanic's C.
Q.
D.?-
No,
sir. I wouhl have .u\svvered the operator ofthe Frankfurt in the satne wa;- thai the Titanicdid, " ii-cep out, you fool," if it had been myplace to when (he F'rankfinl answered theTitanic's C.(^.D, call. When there are only tviohours between Ide and dealh Iwcniy ininuies is along time. I don't know wlial else but a tool tocall a man who is so foolish as to interfere withother communicalion ii\ answer lo thi-
('.Q.Y).
andask "What's the matter? " twenty ndniites later.The commiliee adjourned sliorlly alter fouro'clock until to-morrow,—Rcuter.
CAUFQRNIAN'S CAPTAIN SUMMONED
WASHINT.TON,
April 25.—The captain and wireless operator ()l the liner C.'alifornian, which is dueto sail from Boston on Saturday, have been summoned lo appear before the Tilanic Committee.—Reuter,
Other news of the Titanic disaster andthe Women's Relief Fund on pag^e 4. .

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