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DMir_1912_04_19_001-botes

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THB
monni^a jmitmAh
WITH
THE SECOND LA»OE^ NET SALE.
No.2,648.April 19, 1912One^Hal^eniiy.
WHY WERE THERE ONLY TWENTYPEOPLE ON BOARD THE ILL,FOR 2,207TITANIC ?
Somethmg ijoust be done by the Board of Trade to insist upon a larger number oflifeboats being provided for giant Hners. Only tweiity lifeboats were supplied byMessrs. Harland and Wolff for tbe Titanic, and even twenty, according to theRight Hon. A. M. Carlisle, the man who, as g^eral i^anager to the company, wasresDfinsible for the b^ildijig, was jNwar lc.ex<:«?s t>f the nbmber reouired to tomplyWith the Board of Trade regulatwms.
^^M mips ^m
bigger f Was always infavour of increasing the lifeboat accommodation,** said Mr. Carlisle, " yet it re-mains the same for a ship of ^,0<00 tons as for one of 10,000." The photograph showsthe lifeboats on board the Titanic. It was taken while the giant liner was inQueenstown Harbour on Thursday of last week, in sight of land for the last time."f wo boats, or even three if necessary, may be swung as easily as one on this type ofdavit, it will be seen that there is only one in the photograph.
 
Page
2
THE DAILY MTKRORApril
19, 1912
Gommander's Suicide After Grim Strirggle
^ith
Revolverin Library-
Survivors' Appalling Indictment of the Equipment of the "World'sLargest Liner/'
BEATH-EOLL
TOW
TOUCHES MEAELY
1,
.>i
(
MQ"a,''T«T<f1
B^
m
Wii'WA'W.W^fp
m
TE-ij
The Garp:ithia
has
brought back
its
terrible freight
of
living
and
dead.Dead
men can
tell
no
tales—but
the
living have written
an
indictment
of
mismanagement
at sea
that will thrill
the
world.A committee
of the
Titanic's survivors
met on
board
and
wrote down
the
truth
as
they
saw
it—how
the
Titanic went down,
and why; how so few
people were saved,
and
why;
and how, in the
hour
of his
agony Captain Smith, commander
of the
world'slargest
and
most luxurious liner, shot himself dead
on the
bridge
of his
sinking ship.Two continents wept when
the
Titanic went down.
But the
sinking, terrible
as
it
was and
horrifying,
is as
nothing
to the
charge which those responsible must face.The world will know
why
nearly
1600
people died—the world willfind
out who is to
blame.
OF THE
CATASTEOPHJH
NEW VORK, Agsril
18
(lO.lO p.m.>.—The following' sta-tomcnt, iasued
by a.
committeeOf
the
auyvivlns
passengrers,
has
been f^ivento
tho
Cross;—WOi
the
undersisfnod aurvivin^ passen-
s^ors Off the
Tttanlc,
in
order
to
torostallany 9Gnisa.tionci.l
and
exneg;^ ratedetatemonte, deem
it
our
tiwty
to
sive
to
tho Press
a..
statement
of the
factawhich h.ave oomo
to our
knowledge)a.nd which
VMO
believe
to bo
trues—On Sunday, April
114., at
abc^^i 11.40,on
a
cold, starlit nififht,
the
ship stri>>r-.isS&n iceberg; vwnich
na.u
ooen
irofiortaa
to
the bridjB'e
by the
look-out, bufnot earlyenous^h
to
avoid colliaion.Steps were taJten
xo
ascertain
the
damagio
and
sava
the
passencfors
and
the ship.Orders w«re ifiyen
to put en
lifobeite,the boats'.wer'e lowered,
and the
usualdistress elKoals were sent
out by
wireless -teleerraphy
and
rockets wct'e firedat intervals.Fortunately,
a
vvircioss message
was
.'ficeived
by the
OarpathJa about midnight.
She
sirrived
on the
scene
of the
disaster ^bout
4- a.m.
an
Monday.Th© oWcers
and
ct-ew
of the Car-
SKfithla.
had
Saeers preparing;
ail'
ni^ht
for
thS
fCoecMC Wfork SSB313
for the COm-
fos'S
©? th«
survswofs- These •m/ere'j'ecoiwod
on.
boafd vwith
the
sMiief touch"
in^
vis,r&
sand EciissSneas, sj'a'iairv stttenliionbeiRi^
^ivon
to
sill, irrespoctiwe
of
cfsies.P«s.s0eirtgCOi-9, offlcera sj.ntJ creiM griadlj?grawe
up
theia- atato-i-ooms, clothlnsT
and
comforts
for our
bcneflt.
All
honour
to
thsi^..The e»^lmh Beard
of
Trade passensfers'oeirtiflca.te
on
boaird
the
Titanic allOMredfor
a,
total
of
approximAtely 3,S00.The same cortiilcate called
for
lifeboataccomniodation
for
approximately
9S0
in
the
fotlowins; boats:—Fourteen largulifeboats,
two
smaller boats, four
C0t-
lapsible boats. Life preservers wereacce^sibio
In
a|>f>arontly euffloient
nu^f
bor
for aH on
board,
the
U-pttyp^t^ijii^i^
number
of
passeniserB carried
at the
time
of the
colHssion wwasi
First class
330
Second dass
320
Third class
: 7Sp
Total
1,400
Otncers and-erew
940
Total 2,340Of
the
foreKoinig about
the
foilfnwinenuntber were rescued
by the Car-
pathiai—First class
216
Second class
125
Third class
200
Offlcors
4
Seamen
, 38
Stewards
ss
Firemen
yi
Crew
210
Total. <about}
7TB
The number saved
wa«
about
SO per
cent,
of the
rnaximum ca,pacity
of -ihi
Dfeboata.The boats
at all
tlmeB
to be
properlyeciuipped with provisiortB, water, Uunpsicompasses, lisb^,'etc. Ufe'-^viiiic boatdrills .should-
be
made frequent
and
thoroughly carried
oiti/ anti
omcercshould
be
armed
at
boat drill.
.
A arreator reduction
in
epeed
In fot
and-ice,
as the
damstg'e
if a
CDllistonactually occurs
Is
liable'to
be
less.We *'9el,it
our
duty
to
call
the
attention
tif the
public toWhat
vwe
considertjio inadequate supply
of
life-savingappliances provided foir modern
pas-
QensS^r
aieamah'ips
and
recommendthat immodJate steps
be
talcen
to
compel passeng^er steamers
to
carry sul^.-cient boats
to
accommodate
the
maximum numbet"
of
pso^i&
carrie
don
Tfie following- facts wwere olsserwodand Bhoul
dbe
considre'ed
in
thia cosi"nection;—In addition
io the
fnsufil-
Cipnc^
of
lifeboats, raf^s,
etc.,
therewas
a
lack
of
trained seajnen
to man
the same) stokers,'stev^ards,
etc., are
not efficient boat handlers.There wore
not
enough officers
carry
out tho
omersency ordere
oii
the
bHdite
and to
superintend
the
launching:
And
control
of th^.
lifeboats
and
at*'
aliiacince
of
searchlliehtB.The Board
at
Trade rules allow
for
entirehr
t«b
nt^jiv jp&pp!e.{n
^acb
boftt^ta pfMHii^t^n'Mitf Mwne
tt).
Km
propertir.IWuMfl«m'
CAPTAIN SMITH.
HEAKT-BROKEN MESSAGE
TO
BE
REAVED FROM
THE
WIDOWOF
THE
CAPTAIN.
The following meesaare vuas posted.outside
tho
White Star offices
at
Southampton yesterdasf afternoon.It
is
sighed
by Mrs.
Smith,
the
widovuof Captain
E.
J.
Smith, R.N.R.,
of the
Titanici—"To
my
poor fellow-sufferers."
My
heart overflowre with grrief
for
you
all, and ia
laden with sorrow thatyou
are
vireigh^d down with this terribleburden thai
has
been thrust upon
us.
"
May God be
with
us and
oon^fort
us
alli "Yours
in
deep sympathy,
" ELEANOR SMITH."
On
the
Titanic
the
boat deck wfasabout 78ft. above wrater,
and
consequently
the
passonsrers «vere requiredtp embark before lowrerina;
of the
boate, thu» ondanjscrine
the
Operationand preventing; thi& taklnif
of the
maMi-mum. number
th»
bo&ts would hold,In coftciusipn
we
au^gevt
that
an
inter national
conforon&ei
«houid
p^
c^led,
.and ye
ref-Qmmend
the
PK«BM^»
af
idbn^ical iva.we pii-ovIdln&
for-
![>-«safexy
of ail at sea.
We .urge
th? U.S.
aoyernmon;t
fe
iMike
the.
Initiative
as
soon
as
possible.-Reutor.The statement,is slwied by/Mr. SamuelOoidenbor^. ohftplrmaii^of
the
l^^uuienac«rs'Committee,
and
twenty-five others..—Reuter.
€APTAIN iSMITH^S SUl<)Ii>E
NEW YORK, April IS.—The survivors statethat
the
captain
of the
Titanic shot himselfon
the
bridgie.M^W YORK, April
IS <11
p.m.).'.~lt
is as
serted
by one
passenger
of the
Carpathjathat Captain Smith committed suicide
on
She bridge
of the
TitE^nio before
she
wentdovtfn
and th^t 1;he
chief enj^ineer
amo
committed suicide.Italians vifere shot dea.d
in
the^trus:sle
for
fiiig to this circum's^rttial accoMiit
of the
capt^n*©
end tho
revolver
was
^.rrested from
his
hands
in the
library,
but h©
brok&
awa^ to th©
bridgreand Shot himseH *»»i*ough
the
-tou'fh.—Reiser.
LANDING
13
LIFE«OATS:
NEW YOSK,
April
18 (10
p'm.).—The first survivors began
.to
leave
the
ship
at 9.35, , / .
" Ttic delBy indobkiiig
was due to the
necessityof-'takiag'off "the^'Titanic's, .thirteen' Hfeboa'ts.-^Eeuter.
A desicrlptioni'of the-splendid response
t<i^^^<Th» D^iy^ali5«"»appttai on-i^ct^^ttrf
of
th^'.T1tof£i«'^euf^^^m«tppeara
on
-p^jfit^
8\ ' '
Indescribable Sufferings" Aftef
NEW YORK,
April 38.~^-MJss Andrews,
an
clden^iady, interviewed
by the
Exchange representatiTC,said that
the
crash occurred
at
11,35
p.m. on
Suada^
mghf.
The women
and
children
got off in tie
HfcboatB
a^
12
45 a.m. The
Titanic sank
at 2 a.m. and the
Cat*
pathia picked
up the
boats
at 8.30 a.m.
"Many wOTOcn
arc
in:iane,"
she
added.
"Mrs,
Aitor
is
aboard.
We
didn't know until daybrepikwiiether
wc
would
be
rescued.
We
wme
in
oppnijuats ciglit hours
aid Ihe
suffering
oi
all \¥as in
describable."N"i:w
YORK,
April
18.
—MisH Eonnell,
ai
\<>ung.stown,,Ohio, said
the
Titanic
was
ploughsing through icefields when
the
collision occurred,A large proportion
of tbe
passengers were asleep.The bottom
bow
drove into
the
iceberg, aiidthe lower plates were torn asunder.Large volumes
of
water rushed
in
with irresistible force,
and the
liner began
to
sink rapidlyby
the bow. The
Titanic seemed
to
slide acrossthe
top of the
berg.The passengers hurriedly seized theix clothing,and immediately
the
lifeboats were made ready.As
the
liner continued
to
gradually recede inti^the trough
of the sea the
passengers marchedtowards
the
stem.HYMN
AS
SHIP WENT
DOV/Ti.
The orchestra belonging
to the
first cabinassembled
on
deck
as the
iiner
was
going dowaand played ."Nearer
my God to
Thee."In some
of the
boats women were shrieking
for
their husbands, others were weeping,
but
manybravely took
a
turn with
the
oars.—Exchange,.
" By
thut time most
of the
lifeboats were somedistance away,
and
only
a
faint sound
of the
stratni
of
the
hymn could
be
heard.
As we
pulled awayfrorn
the
ship
we
noticed that
she was
'lipg*abcked,' showing thai
she was
already breakingin
two.-
•'She.was
not
telescoped,
the
force
of the
impactbeing sustained
on the
keel more than
the
bows."We were
in the
small boats
for
more tban fouihours before
we
were rescued
by the
Carpathia.—Exchange.
KILLED
BY
BLOCKS
OF ICE.
NKW YOHK,
April 18.—Mr.
C. H.
Stenjfel,
a
first-class passenger, said that when
the
Titanicstruck
the
iceberg
the
impact
was
terrific,
and
great blocks
of ice
were thrown
on the
deck,killing
a
number
of
people.
The
stern
of the
vessel,TOite^in Ithc
air,
and-people
ran
shrieking•frbin-'their"berths, b'glowr
' . •'/•
••"Wtiinferi •"li.nd/'childi^en', some
'of the .
formejhysterical, "having^v been
i
rapidly separated
'
froiilifausbands,
,
bitjithefs
Sjid. fathers, ,vi;ere .^'quickly-.placed-ih.bdafs'/b'y t"he' sailors, who,.like .theirj)fEccrs,\ .were heard
to
;lhreaten ineii that .they.Wip.uld sh6,ot-
if
male passengers attenipted'tb'get
mio
th^'boai^.aliead of^th^ women.'Indeed,
it was
said'that shots were actuallyheard.
'.'.,..
Mr.-Stengel added thtitamtmberof nien thregrt^ernselyes into
the sea
when' they
saw
that thereVras
no
cjiaffce
of
their reaching
the
boats."
"
Hdi#they died,"
he
observed,
"I do not
know."-^Exchange,
'WHO WERE LOST
AND ARE
FOUND.
NEW YOHK,
April 18.^Dr. Henry
W:
Frauen-thal
and his
wife, who-had previously .beefe'^¥e.Ported ]os_t, came 'ashore' from theCarpathia.^'Exchange.'^
THEY DIED TOGETHER.
NEW YORK,
April 18.—Mr.
and .Mrs.
IsidofStraus were drowned together,
Mrs.
Straus
re
fusing
to
leave
her
husband's side.According
to the
dcscriplioii': given
by
feijow-passengcvs,
the
noted
New
York inillionaire
and
his wife went
to
their deaths together, standing
arm
in
ami on the
first cabin deck
of the
Titanic,
Mr.
Straus quietly
and
tenderly reassuring
his
wifeso
far as he
codid.As
the
lifelxjats were receding from
the
sceneof
the
disaster
Ihe
couple were observed standingstiH calmly awaiting their inevitable fate,
CARPATHIA ARRIVES
-IN A
STORM
NEW YORK,
Thi!rsday.--It
is a
wild night out*side
the
harbour
and
there
is a
heavy
fog
over thfib'ay.Rain
is
falling
and
there
is
lightning
at
interrala,Despite heavy weather,
the
Csirpathia maintaineda limite'd speed
of
thirteen knots
per
hour.When
,she
pgtsscd
the
quaraiitine station doctomwent abgardi—Exfharige.liatei',"-^Darlc^es5 arid' heaW rain ^,dclay_p(J-^
^*
>:^arpflielint6'th^ dock' 6f>thc Can>athia,;'\^rhich:.i*ii5*4'cc?em0iished.
ieiy'-'^vly^,.
 
April
19, 1912
-rm.
MiM^a
Page
3
TftAGEDT
OF
ABSENT
NAMES.
*• John
SmitK
Carpenter/*
and
What
It
Means.
WOMEN'S VieiL
FOROF
DEAE
MOBE SUKYITORS
LISTS.
Two further lists
of
survivors
of the
Titanic weremad« public last night—one
a
short list imclassifiedissued
ia N«w
York
by the
Cunard CompEusy
and
the other
a
list
of
some
130 add
names
o(
third-class passengers
or
crew sent
by
wireless frojoNew Yori
to the
ofSces
of the
White Star Line.
'
The
list
of
steerage iiassengen
is yet far
fromcomplete,
but at
best
the
deaih-roll
in the
thirdelass
can
hardly
be
less than 450—450 names missing from
the
list.The griia record
is all the
sadder
and
more moving bccaiue
ol the
circumsUnces
ia
wluch
the
Bftjority
of
them went
out.
They were emigrants,
and on
auch
a
boat
as
the Titanic,
the
best' class
of
emigrants. Theyhad left
the old
life behiad with
ol! its
troublesafld impos^biiities
and
dxaggine-down hopeless-new; they
had
cast this slough
off, and
weregoing forth,
full
of
hope once more,
to a new
existence where everything would
be
begun
all
over again.And then
tc be
caught like rats
in a
trap!
And
60
way
out.
On the
horizon, life
and
high hopes
-
facing them,
the
agony
of a
long-drawn-out
and
horrible death.
.
"John Smith, carpenter," among
the
names
of
mjsaing does
not
convey much
in
glancing downthe list.
But
"John Smith missing
"
means
a
wholeworld
of
tragedy Bomewhcre.Somehow
or
other, things
had
gone wrong
in
England; somehow
he was not the
success
he
felthe Ought
to
have been.So
tor the sum of
£S
Is.—-the price
of a
third-class cabin
on the
Titanic—John Smith purchasedthe chance
of
another start
in
life,Then
one
night, when almost
in
touch with
the
promised land, John Smith found himself
in the
middle
of a
huddled group
of
distraught fpllow-Gieatures. taced with
a
death which
was
certain,but whicn
was not
swift.
SOME
OF
THOSE SAVED.
The foUowing list, with many names mutilated
by
wireless transmission,
is
that sent from
New
Yorkby Reuter yesterdaj",
and at
night added
to aad
corrected
by the
White Star Company,
who re
ceived apparently
a
similar
]ist
from
New
York
via
Southampton:
—-
THIRD CLASS PASSEHOERS
OR
CREW.Mar; Hsrgevy,HftQwiEuQ Marllcarl.Ada a AturEon.Rosft Abbott.AJUese? Abeitepi.
AdiatBon
(I)
PiJlj AkMk».I>A Aksaks,Bad^'^urft Aloua.Edca Anderson.UftEikjuiv AiEim.Betxftft AEUantl.
UnUin
AstlftDd.Pelj«; AstlftBd,lilHan AstlBJitl.Biner Barisoa.Sml^ BatmuLMarl* So'cketeom.
UUit.
Boklia.H^iiue Boklia.Eogone
Boklla.
M«rie Boklia.Bridget Bndlej-,
BOM
Brtdgat.D«niel BacMeyEHen Osrr.Bojram C^sem.
Swit
Ooielll.John CJiatleea.aahn ChoonBon.KsUe GonnoltrMinoia CooU>.Hewiiio (tonto.WiROonto.l*. M. Oribb.Bineea Ottbalnk^
F,
D.
Dalj.
Oh»Tles Dftb.Theodore DemoedCTmoucler
!),
HaigaT«t Devangy,DalU DiatKidel mn.Agoea Do?t {or
Dic'i}.
IKKW
CII.
Eldergick.
Noola BlisBa.MtE, Bttidean
and
two ciU-,,drOT.Margatat Harriann.sirora Hanwdkan.Ooolt
Tieimig.Ching
Jlip,Jn5«3
Jap.
8. Jofeim.SeJone Joabur?,Floretioe Kasorny,Eoil[or:-ni Kirone.jlnii4 SCoiilHjltal,30Eep!i KriKPsno.
Aitm
IrtidRaas,Kriatof Madsan,Bertha, Malliede!!.
(Ha-
Eeana Manman.JavJo Maiia,Ber£h& MjaiAB.Kati* McOaiEbj.Thoiiiu McCoramcV.Delin McDcrmott.Mor^ Slcuovern,Annie McGowau.Job a Mclitifto.Bmest MtjKoyAlice MoKoyMaggie Msriigan.
AD0a
Metaemock.Q. JD Messarowk.Amin* MissuinjOHft,Albert Moss.Ua^os Uonbatak.Halin Idonb&ivk,Oitota Moabarclf.Kri}«)iiaa Mttlain.K*tie Mnliin.Maggie 'Miupby.Nora Mncpb?.Hobia SeJcet.Mary Heket.Berthu Halson.Catto NeUon.'HeknlDa
O,
Nelton.
John
Ktckarea.Samueia Nnbnlftket.
~
Nyheb.KicoJa Omdali.Norn O Leary,Arthur Oflac,Helena On^len,Andetson Oeplnmd.Scnrly OcmsOD.Osterins Pntoii.Hobesa P^tos.Krncst Parsons.BeBott Ptoard.Anna B«ibott.Narasy Kotb.Jan Helio>:biiit.
-
Asel Shiae.Hose flibeipome.Agnea SibBlrftmn.Beatrice ainde,ealta flmjtJ>&.Anna ^osa,Amy SfcanieyJulio Slrfodee.Fitnas" Siibiiiaket.Ncoln Sulioi,Johnii Bntwhnaa,Efeonorali Tatl.WillJ-wi 'rfints&vt.JletiviB a'orkiils.
V. ArfiOiiin,
Kllen Wicks.Hi ine Yssburg.jtnnna YoviseflMajci^o
yoascf.
H. ManMS Usefa.
IPianp
Zena.To
you,
perhaps, each name
is Qn!y_ a
name.But
to
somebody—some relative, some friend, somesweetheart—the printing
of a
name
is the
gladdestnews
in all the
world.
NAMES FROM
NEW
YORK.
NEW VOBK,
"April
I8, 5
p.m.—The followingloiter
Bst of
fittrvivOrs from
the
Titanic
has
been}Siraed
bj( the
Cunard Company:
,
Fiasr.
CLASS.—MIS.
G.
Thome,
Mrs. and MJ^s
CfUXH^on
SECOND
CiASS."-Caroline Deystrom, Mary
Jet-
jrao; Aooa Hamlin
and
child (probably AmiaHamatinen
and her
infant son),-Marian KanlonIprobably Mra. KontarJ, Bertha
I^t,
Daisy Bright
ip^Hhiy
Urn
Dagmar Beight), Mildred Brown,
Waiting
All
Night
at the
White Star Offices
for
Names
of
Titanic's
Saved.
Still they waited yesterday—the wives, i^others,aisteis, daughters
of the men who
went down withthe Titanic.It
was the
fourth
day of
burdensome suspense
to
anguished hearts.
To
those
who
waited
and
vratched
for the
remaining names
of the
saved
it
was'the most dreadful
day of tdl. For the
newsmight arrive
at any
minnte.Just b^ore
iO
p.m.
a
further
Uat was
posted
-ap,
and there was
aa
almost iraniic rush,on.the part
trf
the
sad
crowd inside, to gather
the
latest tidings.One woman -who
had
several rela^ns
cm
boardthe Titanic T»as completely overcome with emotmnwhen
she
discovered that" the names
of
loved oneswere misMng irom thedist.Since
the
first sinister news
of the
disaster
to
the Titanic shoc&^d
the
world
on
Monday
mom-
b|[,
hundreds andthousands
of
men. women
and
children haTc waited, half
jn
hope, half
in
fear,for
a
name,
for the
word
or two
making 311
the
difference between life
and
death
to
them.Day 4f ter
day
they have crowded
the
ofikres
of
the White Star Line, anxiously scaj^oing
the
typedlists
on the
notice-boards, questioning
the
quiet-spoken officials.Yesterday
the
inquiries
and
visitors were
not
S
uite
so
nameious
as
previously,
but all day
longlere
was a,
steady stream
of
grave-faced
men
and sad-eyed women seeking
for
newsSome
or the men and
women
had
been
up all
night
in
London, snatching what sleep they couldin
the
offices
in
Cockspur-sEreet.WOHJUI'S rWO-BAIfS* WAIT.One woman
had not
left
the
building, except
for
a
few
short intervals
to
snatch some food,
for two
whole days.
But
yesterday morning, assured thatno news could
be
c:ipected
for
some hours-and thatidie would
be
instantly informed
by
telegraph whenany
did
come,
she
urft
the
office
and
went sadlyhome.Another, young
to
know such tragedy,
was a
youth sistecn
or so,
whose father ivas engaged
on
the liner.
He has
haunted
the
building since Monday.
and
could
no
longer keep his. feelings
and
feats
to
himself.
"
Tell
me," he
said,
to a
clerk,
"
tell
me all you
know.
If my
father
is
dead, don't hide
it
from
me.
I can
bear
the
news;
I
know
he is
drowned.You Can't shock
m« any
more than
I
have beenshocked,"In
a
comer, sitting silently with
a
friend,
was a
woman, dressed
in
deep mourning, whose eyes
had
such deep, black hollows uiider them that
at
firstsight
it
almost looked
as if
they
had
been bmised.ALWAYS
IN
TEABSOnce
on
eiderly lady groped
her way
from
the
notice board, where
she had not
foimd
the
nameshe
was
yearning
to
read.
She
went
to the
counterand began
to ask if
there
was any
news
of her son.
But Before
she
could properly frame
her
question great gulping tears choked
her, and she
turnedaway,
her
question unasked—but answered
for all
that.And
so, for
hour after hour, things went
on, the
same familiar, grief-slacken figures coming
in
again
and
aeain, scannmg
the
typed Lists
of
passengers saved,
and
departing.Ahvays there
was no
fresh news.Resignation-^a sort
of
deadened bowing
to a
cruel fate—was
the
keynote
of the
scene.
The
waiting ones
had
become hardened; they
had
passed through
the
erst anguish
of
fierce despair,and
the
ache
in
their souls
was
perhaps lesspoignantly wrenching.
?
Some—the more hopeful ones'—still expressedthe sort
of
half-hearted conviction that some
of
the Titanic's passengers
"
must have
been
pickedup
by
other vessels'' than
the
Carpathia.But
the
tone
in
which they spoke showed thatthey
did not
really believe
Jt in
their innermosthearts.Generally hope deferred seemed
to
have madethe heart sick—and there were many sick, achinghearts
in
Cockspur-street
all day
yesterday.
WAITING
FOR ?
IFrovn
Our
Ovun Correspondeflt.)SOTJTHAMFTOS, April 18-—Ther« were furtherheartrending; scenes here to-night, when, shortlybrfore midnight,
the
mayor appealiiig crowd
01
ed
to the
wait-wives
and
olher relatives
of the
Titanic's crew
who had
been anxiously scanaingthe lists
of
survivors—firsj posted
at 7
p,m.~togo home
and
rest.There
was
little likelihood, continued
the
mayor,
of
further news
for
some hours, owing
to
atmospherical difficulties
in the
western ocean,Slowly
and
sadly
the
crowd then dispersed,
and
many woiAen were
led
away sobbing bitterly.It
was
exactly
7
p.m. when
the
first large sheetof names
of
survivors
on the
Caipathia was affixedto
the
hoard outside
the
White Star offices here.There were abottt 40O persons present then,
but
soon
a
huge crowd
had
gathered.The names were wtittwi just
as
rwreived, withoutany explanation whether Ihey were third-class passengers
or
crew. Most
of the
thirty names
in the
first list were foreign
and
were
not
recognised
by
anyone
in the
crowd.Mr. Cnrrie,
the
Southampton manager
of the
Wi^C Star, said
the
names were also oeing sentstraight
to the
London offices
for
distribution."We
are
getting
the
names very slowly,"
be
said,
" for the
atmospheric conditions
are bad, and
it will
be
hoars before
we ^
them
ail.
"As each name
is
received
we
have
to
send
a
telegram
to the
passenger's home
in
Italy, Scandinavia, France,
or
wherever
It may be.
CaOWD WATCHES
IN
SILENCE.Police formed
a
cordon
in
front
of the
boardto keep back
the
crowd, which rapidly grew
to
an enormous size
as the
news that
the
names werebeing announced spread through
the
town.
The
dead silence
of the
waiting throng
was
most
im
pressive.One little private message
by
wireless
was
posted after
the
first list: "Jimmy,—Please callat
9S,
Millbrook-road
for
information aboutPatsy."In Sontbamptoi^
the
home
of
many
of the
TitonJc's crew,
the
tragedy
is too
deep
for
tears,One widow,
Mrs.
Preston,
of ^,
Mjllbank-strect, told me'that
her son,
Thomas CharlesPreston, aged twenty-two,
who was a
coal trimmer
on the
Titanie,
was the
main support
of
herself
and her
four younger children.
She has
no means
of
livelihood,
lor she can no
longerwork
at the
washtub,
and her
second
son is an
errand
boy,
earning only
a few
shillings
a
week,
iO&T
A
CHANCE.
"
There
is
just
a
chance that
Tom may be
in
a
boat,"
She
said,
*' for
when
the "ten are
giyen boat Stations they generally have
one of
each class
in a
boat."
Mrs.
May, of 75,
York-Btrcet, told
mc she had
both
her
husband and eldest son
on the
Titanic
as
firemen,"I have seven other younger children,'
she
said, "besides
my son
Arthur. _ Hiswife
and
litt!«
son, two
months
old,
also live
wjh u> so
there
are ten of us
here.
God
help JS
!"
The White Star Line announce that they
are
prepared
to
relieve .temporary needs
of
.relativesof
the
crew
at
Southampton
And
settle legai
pay-
raenfs
as
soon
as
possible.All announcements
as
received
are
posted
in
Mack
ink on
sheets
of
white ipaper
a
yard squareand
in
letters three inches «ieep,
so
that namescan easily
be
read.
CORRECTING
THE
LISTS.
The following Gorrectitons were niade yesterdayafternoon
to the
official list,
of
survivors postedat
the
West
End
branch
of the
White Star Lme:FlKST
CjJiSS.
—Mr.
H. O.
Chambers;
the
Countess
of
Rothes* maid.
SECOND
CLASS.—Miss
Margery Collyer.Names hitherto undecipherable were given
as
:
SECOHD
CI^SS.—Mr.
Marshall, M iss Nellie
Walcroft, Miss Florence Ware.It
is
presumed that
the
names ChandamSon,Olivia, Renaga, Eaaelt, Sogesser, Sercpca
and
Thor
arc
those
of
i«aids,
and
Leseeur
and
Stef-
fanson valets.The following corrections
are
also made
: "
ReadKimberley
as
Kimball Panhart
as
Anbert, Riger-son
as
Uyerson,
Mr. anJ
Mrs. "Ward
as
Miss AnnaWard,
and
Mrs. Washington
as
Mrs. Washingt-mDodge."Miss Francateili, whose name appeared amongthe first-class passengers,
is
stated
to be
Lady DuffGordon's maid.In view
of Mr.
Buxton's statement concerningthe seventeen years' lethargy
of
the Board of .Tradeand
its
awakening
!ast
year, some facts about
the
tonnage
of
modern passenger vessels make
in
teresting reading.Investigation
of
Lloyd's Register reveals
the
existence
of
some fifty-eight B.ritish liners
of
morethan 10,000 tons. Including
the
Titanic these
may
be divided
as
follows
:
OVER 40.000 tona.Tltanlo.
!
Uljwpk.OVEH 30,000 TONS.Mauretania.
I
l.usitanfa.OVKH 20,000 l-ONS.Adriatic.
1
Cedrio.Baltic.
I
Ccllic.OVER 16,000 TONS.Ofl.vinia.
I
Carrnania.Ft a neon a.
I
LaiMnta.Wiai foiiTtcen iiaere over 125QO tora,
and
nbfrnttTCentr-four vessels
of
10,00!)
to
12,500 tons.All
tn&
aiiOve vessels untlei- OKtetin^Ciovornrnont rogulEitiori^ ctivry
the
earr
o
tninimum lifcbaei.t a.ccomniodation,The glaring blunder
of
departmental somnolencebecomes eveo more startliiigjy apparent when
wc
come
to
boat aecommodation figures,
of
which sliefoHovifing' examples {quoteri from Lloj'd'i. li.st)
-.nc
eloquent:—AtHOftunodatit)!!
for I
ifebcnts
](!^i
'iit-ant'S S,r>a7 l,lGaAdrhitic
-
3KRo
1,033
MauletaniH a,S72
97Q
OfiiJiia
,
i,2si
ova
^
The
report
of Sir
Normao Hiils' comniitlec
or
lifeboats, which
was
pablishL-d
by Mr.'
Button Is.'.tnight,
was
sent
to the
Board
ol
Trade LASTJtJLY.They recommend that
the
number
of
boats
lo
be placed under d.avitsfor vesscls.of 10,000 tons
and
upwards
be
sixteen,
and
that additional boats shouldbe readily available
as
follows: —ExtraVea*«l8. Llfelioata12,000
to
20,000 tons
2
ZOOOO
bo
35,000 tons
, 4
36,000
to
a5,O0O tons
,,....
e
Orrtsc
45,000 tons
.,, 8
Had these recommendations been provisionallyadopted
the
Titanic's boats, could have ^ccommo'dated
1,486
persons—a iwssible saving
of at
least^00 nK)I$ lives.Miss Moore.
Mr.
piBKwotMlU MUttS-ftatvituA dacreo
waa
gi^^htttd yastarday
to Mrs.
EHi«B[« SterwK>o« wfw»
mim0A
a
dtolu- Some 8,(Kl() bags
of
letters
and
800 parcels have
Xtan
of her
marriaere
wit^
Mr.
Percy Biswoott. Mlea Carrie MOore,
tha
welt*
.. . . .. -
known actrecs,
and
Mlati
Ivy
Salviit were mentioned durtn^
the
6<ns«.
EmiN,
SACBiriCE
TO
BED
TAPE.
Recommendations
for
Life-S.vingHung
Up
Since Last
July.
FULL INQUIRY
TO
BE
MADE
"There must
be
a.
fuH
inquiry inlo
the
toss
of
the Titanic,
The
disaster creates
a new
situationwhich will need
to be
most carefully considered."So said
Mr.
Buxton, President
of the
Board
of
Trade,
in the
House
of
Commons yesterday afternoon,
in the
course
of a
lengthy statement
on the
regulations governing passenger ships. Board
of
Trade regulations required
on a
ship
of
10,000 tonsand upwards accommodation
for
AGO
The
life-/Saving appliances
an the
Titanic were
as
follows :
Accommodating,16 boats
on
davits
9^
Additional boats
and
rafts
- 1"^
4S
life-buoys,
and
3,560 life-belts.Thus there
was
accommodation
for 1,108
persojjain boats
and
raits, with 3,8E» floating apphances.The certified maximum
of
passengers
and
crewwas 3,500,
and the
actual number when
the
vesselleft, 2,208.Mr. Buxton explained that
the
rules now
in
forcewere originally drawn
up in 1890 and
revised
in
1894. The
highest provision
was for
vessels
of
10,000 tons
and
upwards. (N.B.—There
are
nearlyfifty Britiiih liners
of
over '10,000 tons
»p to the
now building Gigantic
of
54,000 tons.)Mr, Euxtdn went
on to say
that
in
view
of the
increased size
of
modern vesselsThe
B<tara
of
Trade only last year
eug-
jsasted
a
rovl»ion
of
these ruieo,
and re
ferred
to the
Advisory Oommittoo
on
merchant tBhippins
the
tiuestlon
of the
revl^onof
the
rules
and any
particular provision
to
be
tneuit)
in the
case
of
oteamera
of
largeafxe.After considering this report, together with
the
views
of the
expert adviser^
the
Board
of
Tradewere
not
satisfied that
the
increased provision
re
commended
by the
Committee
was
adequate,
and
referred
the
matter back
to the
Committee
for
further examination.
"
Only last year,"
are the
Minister's words. Only
^
few
months wasted while thousands
of
lives
are
hazarded every
day
!
And now.
apparently,
1,500
Jives sacrificed
to
Governmental RED
TAPE.
BACING ACBOSS ATLANTIC.
"
1 wish
the
House
to
understand quite clearlv,"said
Mr,
BuxtoRj
"
that
up to the
present
it has
never been
the
intention
of the
Board
of
Traderegulation^,
and so far as 1
know
it has not
beensupported
by any
responsible expert authority, thatevery vessel, however large
ana
well equipped
as
regards water-tight compattmcnts, should neces-3J»riIy carry lifebofits adequate
to
accommodateail
on
board.It
had
always been considered
by
expert
au
thorities thai
the
subdivision into watertight
com-
partments should
be
taken into accoimt in_ considering
the
minimum number
of
boats required.Racing iicioss
the
Atlantic
for a
time record
he
could
do
nothing
to
discourage.
LIVES THROWN AWAY
BY
DELAY
i
gpae dowtt with
the
Titanic, said
the
Postmaster-I General last night.

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