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The Eyeopener — February 15, 2012

The Eyeopener — February 15, 2012

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Published by: The Eyeopener on Feb 15, 2012
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05/13/2014

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volume 45 / issue 19February 15, 2012theeyeopener.comSince 1967
Eyeopener
       t       h     e
PHOTO: MOHAMED OMAR
On page3 find out who’sgetting...
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February 15, 2012The Eyeopener
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An increased amount of smart-phones and tablets connected toRyerson’s wireless network hascaused poor internet performanceand a number of connection prob-lems across campus.According to a Feb. 3 servicealert posted online by the Com-puting and Communications Ser-vices (CCS), there were as manyas 14 areas on-campus where stu-dents may have diculty connect-ing to Wi-Fi access points.These areas include: six of theseven oors in the library build-ing, two oors in the George VariEngineering and Computing Cen-tre and ve areas near various lec-ture halls in Kerr Hall South andEast.“In the library building there’sno Wi-Fi there, and if there is, it’sreally slow,” said Prya Chawla, asecond-year medical physics stu-dent.Brian Lesser, director of CCS,says that this problem is a result ofmore and more students bringingelectronic devices to campus andconnecting to the same networksat once.This has resulted in slower ac-cess and connectivity issues.At times, non-laptop devicessuch as tablets, iPods and smart-phones represent 50 per cent ofthe campus’ internet usage.“Over the last two years thenumber of devices connectingto access points have doubled,“he said. “When they are walk-ing around Wi-Fi zones they areconnecting to access points. Ar-eas that used to be OK are [over-whelmed].”While Ryerson’s newer build-ings were designed with this inmind, the older buildings are lack-ing the number of access pointsnecessary to handle such trac.To combat this issue, Lessersays that more access points willneed to be installed in those build-ings and that two additional ac-cess points have already beeninstalled on the rst oor of thelibrary building.However, installing these accesspoints requires network cablesto be installed in the ceilings andCCS is in the process of decidinghow to go about puing them inwithout disturbing classes.“In some areas there’s no quickx, but in other areas there are,”he said. “In a week or two we’llhave a much beer picture of what[we’ll do].”Until then, students will con-tinue to experience problems inconnecting to the internet.“It’s hard to connect to the Wi-Fi and it’s not very strong,” saidShannon Todd, a fourth-year artsand contemporary studies stu-dent. “I always use the internet toget into RAMSS in class.”
3
February 15, 2012The Eyeopener
NEWS
Generosity will not be accepted
A long-standing rule is being enorced at campus restaurants: waiters and waitresses are not allowed to accept tips over 20per cent in order to avoid the 10 per cent the OneCard ofce makes o each tip.
News Eit Clyn Tugen
reports
Sun TV bashes Rye journalism Internet overload
BY Sean TepperaSSociaTe newS ediTorBY reBecca BUrTonnewS ediTor
An editorial on John Miller’s blog, a former Ryerson journalismchair, has escalated into a ght be-tween him and Ezra Levant, SunNews Network host.Now the network is labelling Ry-erson as an enforcer of “left-wingpolitical views.”The personal blog post rst ap-peared on Dec. 30, 2011 whereinMiller described Levant’s Muskokaretreat as a group of ideologicalwarriors set to spread terror on theland — not unlike the Toronto 18.The retreat invites viewers to spenda few days up north with Sun per-sonalities to discuss ideas and at-tend conferences, for a fee.Levant lashed back on his show,The Source, by discrediting Miller’scredentials as a journalist and ask-ing, “how many minds did he poi-son this way?”Levant went on to host anothersegment entitled “Young Brains inChains,” where he invited two for-mer Ryerson journalism students,to push the idea that Ryerson lim-its student thought and forces theirown ideals down their throats.“I saw a tweet from Ezra aboutwhat Miller had said about him. Ithought the comparison was un-derhanded and cheap,” said DerekKreindler, one of the former stu-dents, said about appearing on-air.Kreindler said Ryerson doeshave a predominant political view, but added that the only problem hehad was with the “Critical Issues in Journalism” course as it told themto report on certain communitieswith an eye on empathy.“The journalism professors arereally good,” said Kreindler. “Theydidn’t push it down our throats.”For Kreindler, the political idealsand censoring stemmed more fromhis elective classes.Levant said, “the issue is certain-ly not isolated to Ryerson,” but theychose to focus on the school becauseof Miller’s “bizarre outburst.”Miller, who acted as chair ofthe journalism school from 1986to 1996, has since left Ryerson tocontinue his work as a consultant,writer and expert witness. Levantstill referred to him as the “fathergure of the school,” saying thegeneral culture at Ryerson matchesMiller’s ideas.“It was very unclear to me whatexactly was supposed to be sowrong with the journalism schoolor the university,” said current jour-nalism chair Ivor Shapiro. “It wasmostly innuendo, and vague refer-ences to something or other.”The show used articles from theRyerson Free Press, handpicked bythe former students, highlightingan anti-Israel stance to emphasistheir political point. Kreindler saidhe was unable to correct Levant’sfocus on only one of three campuspapers.Miller posted a web response onFeb. 14 stating that the connection between Levant and the Toronto 18was never intended as a literal com-parison but rather a “virtual one.”Levant said he has not read thisresponse. “I invite any student thatis willing to say that Ryerson is un- biased to come on my show,” saidLevant who isn’t backing down.“He used the word Ryerson a lot.He was trying to get the studentson the show to say that the journal-ism school was lled with left wing bias, but they didn’t say that,” saidShapiro.Students paying by OneCarddon’t need to bother over tippingan excellent waitress, as they arelikely to refuse for fear of beingwrien up.The Ram in the Rye and OakhamCafe’s policy on gratuities is that,regardless of the wishes of the cus-tomer, the maximum tip percent-age that can be applied to a On-eCard is 20 per cent.As an example, when payingfor a Student Loan Special, whichcosts $4.19, you could only tipyour server 84 cents if you wereusing a OneCard.According to Eric Newstadt,general manager of the StudentCentre, this rule is not anythingnew.“It predates me considerably,”said Newstadt, who has been themanager for over two years.The policy was put in place dueto the commission that comes outof the tip and goes to the OneCardoce for every transaction, whichthe Student Centre must then paytheir employee.“When students tip on OneCard,I pay ten per cent of that tip,” saidNewstadt. “It’s a considerable cutto our revenue.”Any restaurant pays a fee whena credit or debit card is used to payfor a meal, but it’s usually any-where between one to three percent.“This rate was set with variousareas on campus to be able to of-fer the OneCard as a method ofpayment for services,” said DarcyFlynn, manager of the OneCard of-ce, in an email. “The 10 per centshould not be considered prot.”According to Flynn, the fee pro-vides support to the OneCard op-erations, specically the transactsystems and POS equipment. John Corallo, director of uni-versity business services, said that“every university charges thisamount.”Newstadt was more skeptical.“The payment processing feefrom the OneCard oce is exuber-antly high,” he said. “I’m paying10 per cent so the university can[fund] other services.”He said the oce is a cash cowin order to fund their businessservices oce, though he clariesthat he is not their accountant anddoesn’t know the exact use of theirprots.“They charge a lot of money sothey can subsidize non-revenue-generating services,” he said.Mathew Harvey, a third-yearengineering student, thinks stu-dents should have the right to tiphowever much they want.“If they want to tip more than 20per cent, they should be allowedto,” he said.Though he doesn’t think he’llhave any problem nishing hismeal plan, Naushadh Ali, a rst-year computer engineering stu-dent, thinks other students mightnd this an inconvenience.“People might tip over 20 percent on their OneCard to get rid ofthe money,” said Ali. “Rather thanhaving a cap on how much theycan tip, it’ll be beer if there wassome way for them to get a refundat the end of the semester.”Newstadt brought up the lackof refund as well, explaining thatpart of the reason for the tip limitis that students would come in andover tip, wanting the server to givethem some of their money back incash.“If I were a student and therewas a sizeable remainder I wouldwant access to that,” he said. “Atthis point the university has tohave a very clear idea of what’sleft in student accounts at the endof the year. They could track aver-ages and give money back to thestudents.”Corallo said reevaluating themeal plans to give money back tostudents is not necessary.He insists that if students followthe posted guidelines in PitmanHall and the International Livingand Learning Centre (ILLC) as towhere their plan should be at theend of each week they will be ableto properly budget their funds.
Screenshot of Sun TV’s The Source.
phoTo: mohamEd omar

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