Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
1Activity
P. 1
Intellectual Property Policies for the Twenty-First Century: The Japanese Experience in Wealth Creation

Intellectual Property Policies for the Twenty-First Century: The Japanese Experience in Wealth Creation

Ratings: (0)|Views: 42 |Likes:
As Sony co-founder Masaru Ibuka remarked upon being awarded the
Japanese Order of Culture, “Inventions are the fount of culture. They are essential
to any culture’s development. There have been many significant inventions
throughout the course of history - among them the ancient inventions of the water
clock and paper-making, the invention of the printing press in the Middle Ages
and, more recently, Edison’s phonograph and the steam engine, which powered
the industrial revolution. All of these inventions have had a profound impact on
the course of human civilization and sparked great cultural development.”
Sakichi Toyoda, widely acknowledged as one of Japan’s top ten inventors of all
time for his invention of the world’s best automatic looms, was very offended by
American policies to exclude Japanese in the early decades of the 20th century.
Commenting on these anti-Japanese policies, he said ruefully, “What have the
Japanese contributed to the building of modern civilization? The Chinese invented
the compass, but the Japanese have invented nothing. That is why the Americans
see Japan only as a copycat nation.” Believing that Japan had to produce outstanding
inventions, to demonstrate to the United States that the Japanese also
possessed very capable intellects, he donated large sums of money to the Japan
Institute of Invention and Innovation to promote the invention of efficient storage
batteries. Indeed, it was his belief that inventing useful technologies and
obtaining good patents contributed to the advance of civilization – and that
patents are thus the foundation of civilization.
As Sony co-founder Masaru Ibuka remarked upon being awarded the
Japanese Order of Culture, “Inventions are the fount of culture. They are essential
to any culture’s development. There have been many significant inventions
throughout the course of history - among them the ancient inventions of the water
clock and paper-making, the invention of the printing press in the Middle Ages
and, more recently, Edison’s phonograph and the steam engine, which powered
the industrial revolution. All of these inventions have had a profound impact on
the course of human civilization and sparked great cultural development.”
Sakichi Toyoda, widely acknowledged as one of Japan’s top ten inventors of all
time for his invention of the world’s best automatic looms, was very offended by
American policies to exclude Japanese in the early decades of the 20th century.
Commenting on these anti-Japanese policies, he said ruefully, “What have the
Japanese contributed to the building of modern civilization? The Chinese invented
the compass, but the Japanese have invented nothing. That is why the Americans
see Japan only as a copycat nation.” Believing that Japan had to produce outstanding
inventions, to demonstrate to the United States that the Japanese also
possessed very capable intellects, he donated large sums of money to the Japan
Institute of Invention and Innovation to promote the invention of efficient storage
batteries. Indeed, it was his belief that inventing useful technologies and
obtaining good patents contributed to the advance of civilization – and that
patents are thus the foundation of civilization.

More info:

Categories:Business/Law
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/16/2012

pdf

text

original

 
P
OLICY
A
DVISORY
C
OMMISSIONOF THE
W
ORLD
I
NTELLECTUAL
P
ROPERTY
O
RGANIZATION
Hisamitsu Arai
Intellectual Property Policiesfor the Twenty-First Century:
The Japanese Experience in Wealth Creation
 
Intellectual PropertyPolicies for theTwenty-First Century:
The Japanese Experiencein Wealth Creation
Hisamitsu Arai
December, 1999

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download