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Homemaking

Homemaking

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Published by Callie
Particular section on sewing for the home.
Particular section on sewing for the home.

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Published by: Callie on Nov 21, 2008
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10/16/2011

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CHAPTER
XV
THE
MAKING
OF
CLOTHINGBY
BEULAH
BLACKMORE
To
the
woman
generally
falls
the
responsibility
of
the
wise
or
unwise
expenditure
of
that
part
of
the
family
income
ap-
portioned
to
clothing.
Whether
she
spends
wisely
depends
on
her
knowledge
of
all
phases
of
the
clothing
problem.
One
of
the
first
questions
that
arises
is
whether
she
shall
buy
ready-made
garments
or
buy
the
materials
and
make
similar
garments
at
home.
The
conditions
surroundingeach
individual
or
family
are
so
different
as
to
make
impossible
an
answer
to
this
question
which
will
suit
all
cases.
Probably
skill,
time,
and
the
limitation
of
one's
purse
are
the
most
influential
factors
in
such
a
choice.
When
selecting
materials
or
garments,
one
should
be
able
to
judge
the
durability,
including
the
quality
of
the
material,
their
suitability
to
the
occasion
for
which
the
garments
areto
be
worn
and
to
the
wearer,
the
becomingness
ofcolor
and
line,
and
the
price
in
relation
to
the
clothing
allowance
from
the
income.
Clothes
have
the
power
to
make
persons
feel
comfortable
and
at
easeor
to
make
them
conspicuous
and
unhappy.
This
does
not
mean
that
the
costume
need
be
new
or
old;
it
means
that
it
should
be
appropriate
and
becoming.
It
means
adapting
the
prevailing
style
toone's
own
type
of
figure
and
personality.
A
person
may
be
just
as
conspicuous
in
an
ultra-fashionable
costume
as
in
one
that
is
very
out-of-date;
but
either
may
be
adapted
to
conform
with
good
taste,
without
a
great
expendi-
ture
of
time
or
money.
To
be
well
dressed
the
woman
who
makes
her
own
garments
must
depend
largely
on
familiarity
with
the
principles
of
design,
a
critical,
discriminating,
and
thoughtful
attitude
toward
cloth-
330
 
THE
MAKING
OF
CLOTHING
331
ing,
common
sense,
skill
in
the
manipulation
of
fabrics,
in
draping,
or
in
cutting
cloth
by
a
pattern,
and
knowledge
of
the
best
equipment
to
be
used.
"
Right
dress
is,
therefore,
that
which
is
fit
for
the
station
in
life,
and
the
work
to
be
done
in
it,
and
which
is
otherwise
graceful,
becoming,
lasting,
healthful
and
easy;
on
occasion
splendid;
always
as
beautiful
as
possible."*
Dictates
of
fashion
too
often
outweigh
one's
good
judgment,
which
in
this
case
should
have
as
a
background
the
principles
of
design.
Clothing
should
interpret
the
personality
of
the
wearer
and
emphasize
pleasing
elements
of
face
or
figure
rather
than
exhibit
the
prevailing
fashion,
which
often
exaggerates
defi-
ciencies
instead
of
concealing
them.
No
costume
can
be
artistic
orpicturesque,
although
it
may
be
considered
fashionable,
if
it
perverts
the
natural
lines
of
the
figure.
In
good
design
it
is
generally
possible
to
emphasize
the
good
points
or
lines
of
the
figure
and
to
make
the
less
de-
sirable
lines
inconspicuous.
This
necessitates
careful
considera-
tion
of
the
silhouette.
Simplicity
insilhouette,
in
line,
in
the
divisionsof
the
costume
made
by
line
or
dark
and
light,
and
in
decoration,
cannot
be
overestimated.
The
search
for
greater
simplicity
and
for
original
detail
are
the
two
principles
followed
by
the
greatest
designers.
Of
equal
importance
with
line
and
the
spaces
formed
by
these
lines
is
the
study
of
color,
texture
an
extremely
subtle
surface
quality
of
a
fabric
often
confused
with
color
and
dark
and
light
values
(pages
45
to
47).
This
is
a
problem
for
each
individ-
ual;
it
can
not
be
studied
too
much.
After
deciding,
then,
on
the
type
of
gown
necessary
for
the
occasion
for
which
it
is
to
be
worn,
the
following
phases
of
costume
design
must
be
considered,
if
the
result
is
to
be
harmonious
and
beautiful:
silhouette;
line,
including
space
division
and
balance;
dark
and
light
spacing;
color;
texture.
It
is
unwise
to
lay
down
hard
and
fast
rulesfor
theuse
of
suitable
color
in
costumes
for
different
types
of
persons,
be-
cause
general
rules
may
have
many
exceptions.
The
following
table,
however,
may
be
suggestive.
*
John
Ruskin.
Arrows
of
the
Chace.
 
332
A
MANUAL
OF
HOME-MAKING
I*
>
llii
11
.95
I*
o
*8
od,
am
1
iS.S
s
01
W.
73
lit
^
-*J
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