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Statewide Seismic Needs Assessment report

Statewide Seismic Needs Assessment report

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Published by: Statesman Journal on Feb 26, 2012
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03/08/2012

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State of OregonDepartment of Geology and Mineral IndustriesVicki S. McConnell, State Geologist
Open-File Report O-07-02
STATEWIDE SEISMIC NEEDS ASSESSMENT: IMPLEMENTATION OFOREGON 2005 SENATE BILL 2 RELATING TO PUBLIC SAFETY,EARTHQUAKES, AND SEISMIC REHABILITATIONOF PUBLIC BUILDINGS
 
REPORT TO THE SEVENTY-FOURTH OREGON LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY
 
By Don Lewis
1
 
2007
1
Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries, 800 NE Oregon St., Suite 965, Portland, Oregon 97232.
 
 
 ii
 
Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Open-File Report O-07-02Published in conformance with ORS 516.030For copies of this publication or other information about Oregon’s geology and natural resources, contact:Nature of the Northwest Information Center800 NE Oregon Street #5Portland, Oregon 97232(503) 872-2750http://www.naturenw.org or these DOGAMI field offices:Baker City Field Office510 Campbell St.Baker City, OR 97814-3442Telephone (541) 523-3133Fax (541) 523-5992Grants Pass Field Office5375 Monument DriveGrants Pass, OR 97526Telephone (541) 476-2496Fax (541) 474-3158For additional information:Administrative Offices800 NE Oregon Street, Suite 965Portland, OR 97232Telephone (971) 673-1555Fax (971) 673-1562http://www.oregongeology.com http://egov.oregon.gov/DOGAMI/  
 
 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Open-File Report O-07-02 Statewide Seismic Needs Assessment iii
Districts Schools*Buildings*
Educational Facilities:
K-12 Public School Districts & Education Service Districts 170 1101 2185Community College Districts 17 179 184
Sum Education 187 1280 2369 
Emergency Facilities:
City Districts (Police and Fire Departments) 143 327Rural Fire Protection Districts 191 440County Sheriff Offices 34 73Oregon State Police 1 26Port of Portland 1 1Acute Care Hospitals 58 116
Sum Emergency 428 983 
SUM ALL:
3352 
 
*
There are 179 community college buildings and 184 “building entities” at the 17 campuses.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
This report summarizes the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries’ work on thestatewide seismic needs assessment of Oregon education and emergency services buildings, as directed bythe 73rd Legislative Assembly (Senate Bill 2, 2005).This assessment is but one step in the multi-decade process aimed at improving the life safety of Oregonians from the risks associated with earthquakes. The awareness of earthquake hazards in Oregonincreased significantly as geologic evidence of “Great Earthquakes” along the Cascadia Subduction Zonewas uncovered beginning in 1986. DOGAMI began mapping earthquake hazards in the Portland area in1987.Today, the statewide building code and engineering design take into account the significant lateralforces generated by the
ground motions
associated with earthquakes. Most damage during an earthquake iscaused by ground motion. However, buildings constructed in Oregon prior to the 1990s were built to lowerseismic standards and are especially at risk of collapse and other forms of structural failure during anearthquake.An integral piece of this assessment makes use of a federal technique known as FEMA 154, the rapidvisual screening (RVS) of buildings for potential seismic hazards, to identify, inventory, and rank buildingsthat are potentially seismically hazardous.The inventoryand estimatedreplacement cost of the building stock that form the basisof this assessmentincludes 3,352buildings. Thepublic schoolsassessed represent97% of the totalenrollment for the2005-06 academicyear. Excludinghospitals, theestimatedreplacement valueof this building stock totals approximately $11.5 billion, led by the K-12 schools at 85%, communitycolleges 8%, fire 5%, and police 2%.After developing the building inventory spatial database, including mapping the physical locations of every site and their seismicity regions, DOGAMI contracted with experienced parties at the three majorOregon universities to collect the FEMA 154 field data. The key field data relate to the structural types andcharacteristics of each building. To ensure consistent data collection, DOGAMI developed a portable digitaldata entry system and rules for making key determinations in the field; the system included an integrateddigital photo camera to record the visual evidence. All relevant Geographic Information System (GIS) datawill be available for interested parties in various formats on CD-ROM and via the Agency’s web page byJune 30, 2007. An interactive website containing the complete report, building scores, and backgroundinformation is now online at
http://www.oregongeology.com
.
The five key parameters that determine the relative seismic risk of a building are the:1.
 
Seismic Zone
(how hard the ground is expected to shake in a given area),2.
 
Building Structural Type
(wood frame, reinforced masonry, steel frame, etc.),3.
 
Building Irregularities
(the shape of the building),4.
 
Original Construction Date
, and5.
 
Soil Type
(softer soils amplify the severity of ground motion).

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