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1936-Foster-Organizing Methods in Steel

1936-Foster-Organizing Methods in Steel

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Published by Sam Calvin

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Published by: Sam Calvin on Feb 27, 2012
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JUUU
IJIJilJ
5917
3000934143
*k
THE
UBRAKH
THE
UMVERSITB
OF
TEXAS
AT
'AUSTIN
WM.
Z.
FOSTER
ORGANIZING
METHODS
IN
THE
STEEL
INDUSTRY
5c
I
f>h
 
'Organizing
Methods
in
the
Steel
Industry'''
is
written
with
theobject
of
aiding
the
most
active
workers
in
the
steel
industry
and
steel
workers
generally
in
organizing
the
industry
inthe
present
campaign.
There
can
be
no
doubt
that
amastery
of
the
principles
developed
in
this
pamphlet,
principles
based
on
practical
experiences,
would
result
ina
greater
efficiency
on
thepart
of
all
those
now
engaged
in
organising
theindustry.
It
is
really
a
manual
of
organisation
methods
in
the
organisationof
the
unorganised
in
the
mass
Production
industries.
The
organisational
principles
andmethods
here
developedcan
be
easily
adapted
to
problems
oforganising
other
mass
production
and
large-scale
industries
such
as
auto,
rubber,
chemical,
textile,
etc.
There
is
a
great
poverty
in
the
labor
movement
of
such
literature.
This
poverty
is
felt
alsoin
labor
schools.
This
manual
should
prove
very
popular
for
trade
union
courses
in
the
various
workers'
labor
schools.
Letus
hope
that
this
is
a
beginningof
the
development
of
such
literature
to
fill
the
need
inthe
present
growth
of
the
trade
union
movement.
JackStachel
Organizing
Methods
in
the
Steel
Industry
BY
WILLIAM
Z.
FOSTER
National
Chairman
of
the
Communist
Party
and
Leader
of
the
1919
Steel
Strike
WORKERS
LIBRARY
PUBLISHERS
NEW
YORK,I936
 
CONTENTS
Introduction
3
I.
General
6
II.
Organizational
Formsand
Functions
7
1.
STRUCTURE
OF
ORGANIZING
FORCES
7
2.
STRUCTURE
OF
THE
UNION
,
8
3-
FUNCTIONS
AND
TASKS
8
III.
Mass
Agitation
9
1.
slogans
10
2.
pubicity
and
printed
matter
io
3.
RADIO
II
4.
MASS
MEETINGS,
DEMONSTRATIONS,
ETC
12
IV.
Mass
Organization
13
1.
INDIVIDUAL
RECRUITMENT
13
2.
OPEN
RECRUITING
'.
14
3.
RECRUITMENT
IN
STRUGGLE
15
V.
Special
Group
Work
17
1.
AMERICAN
WHITES
17
2.
NEGROES
17
3.
FOREIGN-BORN
\J
4.
YOUTH
l8
5.
WOMEN
18
VI.
Company
Unions
19
VII.
Special
Organizational
Work
22
I.
UNEMPLOYED
W.P.A
22
2.
FRATERNAL
ORGANIZATIONS
22
3.
CHURCHES
23
4.
OTHER
ORGANIZATIONS
23
PUBLISHEDBY
WORKERS
LIBRARY
PUBLISHERS,
INC.
P.
O.
BOX
1+8,
STA,
D,
NEW
YORK,OCTOBER,
1936.
Introduction
npHE
METHODS
outlined
below
of
doing
organization
*
work
in
the
steel
industry
are
based
upon
thegeneral
principles
of
organization
strategy
and
tactics
developed
in
my
pamphlet
entitled:
Unionizing
Steel.
Theyembody
the
lessons
ofthe191
9
strike
and
ofother
steel
struggles,
and
they
are
suggested
to
the
Steel
Workers
Organizing
Com-
mittee
for
its
consideration.
The
general
principles
in
my
pamphlet
may
bevery
briefly
summarized
as
follows:
1.
The
organization
work
must
be
done
by
a
working
combination
ofthe
progressive
and
Left-wing
forces
in
the
labor
movement.
It
is
only
these
elements
that
have
the
necessary
vision,
flexibility
and
courage
to
goforward
withsuch
an
important
project
as
the
organization
of
the
500,000
steel
workers
in
the
faceof
the
powerful
oppositionof
the
Steel
Trust
and
its
capitalist
allies.
As
far
asthe
Right-wing
reactionaries(crystallized
in
the
Executive
Council
of
the
American
Federation
of
Labor)
are
concerned,
they
will
not
and
cannot
organize
the
steel
workers.
In
1936,
even
as
in
1
919,
theirattitude
is
one
of
sabotage
and
obstruction.
2.
The
organization
campaignmust
bebased
upon
the
principles
of
trade
union
democracy.
That
is,
every
effort
must
be
made
to
draw
the
widest
possible
ranks
ofthe
work-
ersinto
the
activities
of
the
leading,
decisive
committees,
and
alsointo
the
work
ofthe
organizers
and
the
union
generally.
Only
with
such
democracy,
or
systematic
mass
participation,
can
the
greattask
of
buildingthe
union
be
successfully
ac-
complished.
3.
The
organization
movement
must
be
industrial
and
na-
tional
in
character.
That
is,
(a)
it
must
include
every
cate-
gory
of
workers
in
the
steel
industrynot
merely
a
thin
stra-
tum
of
skilled
workers
at
the
top;
and
(b)
the
drive
must
be

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