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The State of Social Media 2011: Social is the new normal

The State of Social Media 2011: Social is the new normal

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Published by Brian Solis
Part 6 in a series introducing my new book, The End of Business as Usual…this is not content from the book, this series serves as its prequel.
For the last several years, simply adding the word “social” in front of anything and everything from media and gaming to commerce and CRM to business and consumerism, it’s clear that we are finally approaching the end of the hype curve to start making sense of what it all means and just how far it applies to the future of business and media.
Part 6 in a series introducing my new book, The End of Business as Usual…this is not content from the book, this series serves as its prequel.
For the last several years, simply adding the word “social” in front of anything and everything from media and gaming to commerce and CRM to business and consumerism, it’s clear that we are finally approaching the end of the hype curve to start making sense of what it all means and just how far it applies to the future of business and media.

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Published by: Brian Solis on Mar 01, 2012
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08/03/2012

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By Brian Solis, industry-leading blogger at BrianSolis.comand principal of research firm Altimeter Group, Author of the highly acclaimed books on social businessThe End of Businessas Usual and 
Part 6 in a series introducing my new book,The End of Business as Usual …this is not content fromthe book, this series serves as its prequel.
The state of social media is no insignificant affair. Nor is it a conversation relegated to a nichecontingent of experts and gurus. Social media is pervasiveand it is transforming how people find and share information and how they connect and collaborate with one another. I say that as if I’mremoved from the media and cultural (r)evolution that is digital socioeconomics. But in reality, I’mpart of it just like everyone else. You and I both know however, that’ I’m not saying anything youdon’t already know.Social media is clearly becoming the new normal. For the last several years, simply adding the word“social” in front of anything and everything from media and gaming to commerce and CRM tobusiness and consumerism, it’s clear that we are finally approaching the end of thehype curvetostart making sense of what it all means and just how far it applies to the future of business andmedia.But as social media becomes part of our cultural fabricand even as we witness businesses,governments, sports teams, and almost every organization socialize communication efforts today, much of what we see is merely the beginning of something that will one day become something far moreimportantthan the medium itself. Indeed, social media is affecting behavior and nothing ismore important than the ability to influence decisions and ultimately behavior. The state of socialmedia is not necessarily as much about which network is #winning as much as it is about how
(cc) Brian Solis,www.briansolis.com- Twitter, @briansolis
 
people are spending their time, interacting and connecting with one another, and what happens as aresult.To demonstrate this point, let’s review the profound findings from the recently releasedNielsenSocial Media Report.1) Skeptics will now be recognized as laggards as they now officially stand in the way of progress.According to Nielsen, and well, reality, social media isn’t a fad. The report opens with a key findingthat social networks and blogs dominate how Americans spend their time online, which accounts for nearly 25% of their total time spent on the Internet.2) Four out of five active internet users aka everyday people visit social networks.3) Looking beyond the U.S., in 10 major global markets, social networks and blogs reach over 75%of active Internet users.4) 60 percent of people who use three or more digital means of research for product purchaseslearned about a specific brand or retailer from a social networking site. And, 48% of theseconsumers responded to a retailer’s offer posted on Facebook or Twitter.
(cc) Brian Solis,www.briansolis.com- Twitter, @briansolis
 
5) 70 percent of active online adult social networkers shop online.6) 53 percent of active adult social networkers follow a brand.7) Tumblr nearly tripled its audience from just one year ago.As a brand, Nielsen’s report gives us both validation and insight into the importance of social mediain the business mix. But just who’s driving the growth? Understanding the demographics and alsopsychographics of social media users will help us more effectively connect our brand story to theneeds and behavior of thesocial consumer .Nielsen reminds us thatwomenmake up the majority of  visitors to social networks and blogs. The 18-34 segment boasts the highest concentration of activevisitors among all age groups. Americans aged 35-49 are avid visitors as well as they are 4% morelikely than average consumers to visit social networks and blogs than they do any other site. We’vealso learned in previousreportsthat Boomers are also flocking to social networks, with the adoptionof social networks such as Facebook by the over 50 contingent growing by over 88%.
(cc) Brian Solis,www.briansolis.com- Twitter, @briansolis

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