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The Hackers Dictionary

The Hackers Dictionary

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Published by Radikll pro
This document is a collection of slang terms used by various subcultures of computer hackers. Though some
technical material is included for background and flavor, it is not a technical dictionary; what we describe here
is the language hackers use among themselves for fun, social communication, and technical debate.
The `hacker culture' is actually a loosely networked collection of subcultures that is nevertheless conscious of
some important shared experiences, shared roots, and shared values. It has its own myths, heroes, villains, folk
epics, in-jokes, taboos, and dreams. Because hackers as a group are particularly creative people who define
themselves partly by rejection of `normal' values and working habits, it has unusually rich and conscious
traditions for an intentional culture less than 35 years old.
As usual with slang, the special vocabulary of hackers helps hold their culture together --- it helps hackers
recognize each other's places in the community and expresses shared values and experiences. Also as usual,
*not* knowing the slang (or using it inappropriately) defines one as an outsider, a mundane, or (worst of all in
hackish vocabulary) possibly even a {suit}. All human cultures use slang in this threefold way --- as a tool of
communication, and of inclusion, and of exclusion.
Among hackers, though, slang has a subtler aspect, paralleled perhaps in the slang of jazz musicians and some
kinds of fine artists but hard to detect in most technical or scientific cultures; parts of it are code for shared
states of *consciousness*. There is a whole range of altered states and problem-solving mental stances basic
to high-level hacking which don't fit into conventional linguistic reality any better than a Coltrane solo or one
of Maurits Escher's `trompe l'oeil' compositions (Escher is a favorite of hackers), and hacker slang encodes
these subtleties in many unobvious ways. As a simple example, take the distinction between a {kluge} and an
{elegant} solution, and the differing connotations attached to each. The distinction is not only of engineering
significance; it reaches right back into the nature of the generative processes in program design and asserts
something important about two different kinds of relationship between the hacker and the hack. Hacker slang
is unusually rich in implications of this kind, of overtones and undertones that illuminate the hackish psyche.
But there is more. Hackers, as a rule, love wordplay and are very conscious and inventive in their use of
language. These traits seem to be common in young children, but the conformity-enforcing machine we are
pleased to call an educational system bludgeons them out of most of us before adolescence. Thus, linguistic
invention in most subcultures of the modern West is a halting and largely unconscious process. Hackers, by
contrast, regard slang formation and use as a game to be played for conscious pleasure. Their inventions thus
display an almost unique combination of the neotenous enjoyment of language-play with the discrimination of
educated and powerful intelligence. Further, the electronic media which knit them together are fluid, `hot'
connections, well adapted to both the dissemination of new slang and the ruthless culling of weak and
superannuated specimens. The results of this process give us perhaps a uniquely intense and accelerated view
of linguistic evolution in action.
This document is a collection of slang terms used by various subcultures of computer hackers. Though some
technical material is included for background and flavor, it is not a technical dictionary; what we describe here
is the language hackers use among themselves for fun, social communication, and technical debate.
The `hacker culture' is actually a loosely networked collection of subcultures that is nevertheless conscious of
some important shared experiences, shared roots, and shared values. It has its own myths, heroes, villains, folk
epics, in-jokes, taboos, and dreams. Because hackers as a group are particularly creative people who define
themselves partly by rejection of `normal' values and working habits, it has unusually rich and conscious
traditions for an intentional culture less than 35 years old.
As usual with slang, the special vocabulary of hackers helps hold their culture together --- it helps hackers
recognize each other's places in the community and expresses shared values and experiences. Also as usual,
*not* knowing the slang (or using it inappropriately) defines one as an outsider, a mundane, or (worst of all in
hackish vocabulary) possibly even a {suit}. All human cultures use slang in this threefold way --- as a tool of
communication, and of inclusion, and of exclusion.
Among hackers, though, slang has a subtler aspect, paralleled perhaps in the slang of jazz musicians and some
kinds of fine artists but hard to detect in most technical or scientific cultures; parts of it are code for shared
states of *consciousness*. There is a whole range of altered states and problem-solving mental stances basic
to high-level hacking which don't fit into conventional linguistic reality any better than a Coltrane solo or one
of Maurits Escher's `trompe l'oeil' compositions (Escher is a favorite of hackers), and hacker slang encodes
these subtleties in many unobvious ways. As a simple example, take the distinction between a {kluge} and an
{elegant} solution, and the differing connotations attached to each. The distinction is not only of engineering
significance; it reaches right back into the nature of the generative processes in program design and asserts
something important about two different kinds of relationship between the hacker and the hack. Hacker slang
is unusually rich in implications of this kind, of overtones and undertones that illuminate the hackish psyche.
But there is more. Hackers, as a rule, love wordplay and are very conscious and inventive in their use of
language. These traits seem to be common in young children, but the conformity-enforcing machine we are
pleased to call an educational system bludgeons them out of most of us before adolescence. Thus, linguistic
invention in most subcultures of the modern West is a halting and largely unconscious process. Hackers, by
contrast, regard slang formation and use as a game to be played for conscious pleasure. Their inventions thus
display an almost unique combination of the neotenous enjoyment of language-play with the discrimination of
educated and powerful intelligence. Further, the electronic media which knit them together are fluid, `hot'
connections, well adapted to both the dissemination of new slang and the ruthless culling of weak and
superannuated specimens. The results of this process give us perhaps a uniquely intense and accelerated view
of linguistic evolution in action.

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Published by: Radikll pro on Nov 24, 2008
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