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Occupational Therapy For Young Children Birth Through 5 Years of Age

Occupational Therapy For Young Children Birth Through 5 Years of Age

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Occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants support and promote the
development and engagement of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers, and their families or other
caregivers, in everyday routines. These routines include play, rest and sleep, activities of daily living,
education, and social participation. Occupational therapy practitioners, as part of the multidisciplinar
team, provide services to young children and their families in a variety of settings, including hospital
early intervention programs, private clinics, child care, Head Start and Early Head Start programs,
preschool and pre-kindergarten programs, and at home.
Occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants support and promote the
development and engagement of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers, and their families or other
caregivers, in everyday routines. These routines include play, rest and sleep, activities of daily living,
education, and social participation. Occupational therapy practitioners, as part of the multidisciplinar
team, provide services to young children and their families in a variety of settings, including hospital
early intervention programs, private clinics, child care, Head Start and Early Head Start programs,
preschool and pre-kindergarten programs, and at home.

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01/10/2013

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Occupational Therapy
For Young Children
Birth Through 5 Years of Age
www.aota.org4720 Montgomery Lane, PO Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20842-1220Phone: 301-652-2682 TDD: 800-377-8555 FAx: 301-652-7711
Occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants
support and promote thedevelopment and engagement o inants, toddlers, and preschoolers, and their amilies or othercaregivers, in everyday routines. These routines include play, rest and sleep, activities o daily living,education, and social participation. Occupational therapy practitioners, as part o the multidisciplinaryteam, provide services to young children and their amilies in a variety o settings, including hospitals,early intervention programs, private clinics, child care, Head Start and Early Head Start programs,preschool and pre-kindergarten programs, and at home.
Occupational therapy is concerned with
 a child’s ability to participate in daily lieactivities or “occupations.” Occupationaltherapists and occupational therapy assistantsuse their unique expertise to help childrenwith and without social–emotional, physical,cognitive, communication, and adaptivebehavior challenges prepare or and perormimportant learning and developmentalactivities. Through an understanding o theimpact o disability, illness, and impairmenton a child’s development, play, ability tolearn new skills, and overall occupationalperormance, occupational therapists designinterventions that promote healthy development, establish needed skills, and modiy environments toprevent urther disability, all in support o participation in daily activities.Occupational therapy practitioners also play a key role in educating parents, caregivers, and programsta about disability and the development o children with diverse health and learning needs.
Occupational therapy practitioners
bring specifc knowledge and expertise to the team toappropriately address children’s needs and
collaborate with parents and other members of theteam to
•
provide strategies to acilitate ull participation o all children in daily routines;
•
assess children’s developmental and learning needs;
•
plan and implement relevant intervention strategies and developmentally appropriate activities;
•
reduce environmental barriers that limit a child’s participation in amily, learning, andcommunity-based activities;
•
identiy needed assistive technology devices and supports; and
•
prepare children and their amilies or transition to preschool, school, and othercommunity-based programs.

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